TLM Issue

Fiction from Steven O'Brien. Poetry from James Simpson, Matthew Francis, Angela Leighton, Peter Ainsworth, Róisin Kelly, Fred Melnyczuk, Tony Roberts, Holly Howitt, Sarah Westcott, Michael Henry, Peter Robinson, Yang Lian. Essays by Daisy Dunn, Jeffrey Meyers, Judith Segal, Suzi Feay, Andrew Lambirth, Maggie Butt, Stuart Walton, Frank Armstrong, John Gimlette, Konrad Muller, Tom Sutcliffe, Houman Barekat, Will Stone.

Articles

My London

I was born, brought up and have lived most of my life in London, and it fits me like a pair of comfortable slippers. I wasn’t born within the sound of Bow bells like my grandmother, or the Hoxton terraces where my dad grew up; I don’t live somewhere wealthy or literary, arty or gentrified, but in the un-cool yet happy compromise of suburbia. I am a north-Londoner, to my bones, and to me i…

By The London Magazine

Kleist Single Malt

Riding He tried to be a soldier. Seven years he spent in the Guards, seven years he described as irredeemably lost. Then, one afternoon, this young lieutenant from a family that had already given Prussia at least eighteen generals, and who would rather study mathematics and logic, rode all the way from Potsdam to Frankfurt, the other Frankfurt, the one on the River Oder, which is now the Pol…

By The London Magazine

A Gamble with People and Money

  Summer Opera, 2017 (Glyndebourne Festival, The Grange Festival, Grange Park Festival at West Horsley, Garsington Opera at Wormsley, Opera Holland Park) 2017 was not a usual season of opera in our expanding list of British country-house theatres, which Opera magazine deplores. Take the weird choice offered by the Glyndebourne repertoire. No less than two of the three works getting ne…

By The London Magazine

The Ribbleway

  Wild horses wouldn’t get me to central Lancashire for a bank holiday–or so I thought. In fact, all it took was some old friends from Ribchester. ‘Great walking,’ they’d insisted, and before I could say ‘Hey Preston,’ my wife had a copy of Walking the Ribble Way, and we were on the train. What better place to start than Ribchester? Everything about it was slightly outlandish: it was …

By The London Magazine

Panic

  A helicopter quarters the night sky, sets off alarms in my mind. Downstairs, doors forget to lock and there’s an iron-filing taste of blood and spit in my mouth. A sudden sweat drenches my back. I pull the bedclothes over my face, the alarm bells turn up the volume and I hear the tolling of a cathedral voice: ‘Declutter or die. Declutter or die.’ I go down into the dark, t…

By The London Magazine

Walking Through London with Sherlock Holmes

  If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and peep in at the queer things which are going on […] it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable. The concept of stale and unprofitable fiction must have been an unfamiliar one to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle when Sherlock Holmes…

By The London Magazine

The Sandman

  Quiet: the poet is taking the stage. (Well, it’s not a stage, but a circle of bookshop carpet: Shush, we won’t quibble.) She (As we said, we’ll go with it, And anyway, female seems likely - Can you see her now, Her red lipstick, dangly earrings and brocade pumps?) - Stands, sways, Says all her poems are about things that Really happened, That the abstract smudge of the soft-…

By The London Magazine

Emotions Run Cool

  First Love, Gwendoline Riley, Granta, February 2017, £12.99, 176 pp. (hardcover) ‘How many boyfriends are treated like the father figure?’ This question, posed by the American author Chris Kraus on a recent segment on BBC Woman’s Hour discussing the work of Cathy Acker, was rhetorical: the answer is a great many. The cult success of Kraus’s re-issued I Love Dick (1997), an autobiogr…

By The London Magazine

White Building

  For Paul and Maya Between still life and low relief, the squared off, plain, distempered walls of Japanese size, I’m up before there’s need and, tentatively, slide your bathroom door … Here, in this machine for living with its rectilinear forms and functions, its ocean-liner curves, practically on tiptoe, I grasp a D-shaped handle and pull in search of tea: and I glance …

By The London Magazine

Encountering the Unwelcome

Travelling back from Belgium this summer I was inadvertently caught up in the rush of returning holidaymakers, all making for the Eurotunnel at Calais. The signs on the motorway from Dunkirk were ominous. ‘Congestion’, ‘Bouchon’ at junction 27, the channel tunnel. On arrival I became ensnared in a build-up of vehicles which showed little sign of moving. I was in the outside lane of a three-lane …

By The London Magazine

The Hardship of the Voyage

  Night Sky with Exit Wounds, Ocean Vuong, Jonathan Cape, April 2017, £9.99, 96 pp. (paperback) Kumukanda, Kayo Chingonyi, Chatto & Windus, June 2017, £9.99, 64 pp. (paperback) Ocean Vuong’s Night Sky with Exit Wounds and Kayo Chingonyi’s Kumukanda explore journeys, family, and the bridges between cultures. Both poets left their countries of birth at a young age, travelling from …

By The London Magazine

Pagan Pleasures and Youthful Subjects

  On Pagham Beach, Photographs and Collages from the 1930s, Austin/Desmond Fine Art, London, 25 October - 8 December 2017 It is hard for those brought up in a world of gender fluidity, with debates about who has the right to use which bathroom, to imagine the veil of secrecy and repression that prevailed during the first half of the twentieth century around sexual encounters between m…

By The London Magazine

Essays

My London

I was born, brought up and have lived most of my life in London, and it fits me like a pair of comfortable slippers. I wasn’t born within the sound of Bow bells like my grandmother, or the Hoxton terraces where my dad grew up; I don’t live somewhere wealthy or literary, arty or gentrified, but in the un-cool yet happy compromise of suburbia. I am a north-Londoner, to my bones, and to me i…

By The London Magazine

Kleist Single Malt

Riding He tried to be a soldier. Seven years he spent in the Guards, seven years he described as irredeemably lost. Then, one afternoon, this young lieutenant from a family that had already given Prussia at least eighteen generals, and who would rather study mathematics and logic, rode all the way from Potsdam to Frankfurt, the other Frankfurt, the one on the River Oder, which is now the Pol…

By The London Magazine

The Ribbleway

  Wild horses wouldn’t get me to central Lancashire for a bank holiday–or so I thought. In fact, all it took was some old friends from Ribchester. ‘Great walking,’ they’d insisted, and before I could say ‘Hey Preston,’ my wife had a copy of Walking the Ribble Way, and we were on the train. What better place to start than Ribchester? Everything about it was slightly outlandish: it was …

By The London Magazine

Walking Through London with Sherlock Holmes

  If we could fly out of that window hand in hand, hover over this great city, gently remove the roofs, and peep in at the queer things which are going on […] it would make all fiction with its conventionalities and foreseen conclusions most stale and unprofitable. The concept of stale and unprofitable fiction must have been an unfamiliar one to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle when Sherlock Holmes…

By The London Magazine

Encountering the Unwelcome

Travelling back from Belgium this summer I was inadvertently caught up in the rush of returning holidaymakers, all making for the Eurotunnel at Calais. The signs on the motorway from Dunkirk were ominous. ‘Congestion’, ‘Bouchon’ at junction 27, the channel tunnel. On arrival I became ensnared in a build-up of vehicles which showed little sign of moving. I was in the outside lane of a three-lane …

By The London Magazine

Fiction

A Walk Through Rackham Land

  Ideally, if you go into Rackham Land you should go on your own. Take a deep breath and walk. Don’t look for Rackham. Let him come to you. Walk until the brambles snag your right sleeve and the relish of a cool October wind comes sneaking through the thickets. This will be Rackham’s discreet hailing. The marches of Rackham Land are hemmed on three sides by fast roads. The fourth side…

By The London Magazine

Fiction

A Walk Through Rackham Land

  Ideally, if you go into Rackham Land you should go on your own. Take a deep breath and walk. Don’t look for Rackham. Let him come to you. Walk until the brambles snag your right sleeve and the relish of a cool October wind comes sneaking through the thickets. This will be Rackham’s discreet hailing. The marches of Rackham Land are hemmed on three sides by fast roads. The fourth side…

By The London Magazine

Poetry

Old mother moor

  is bitter – peat is the thinnest of comforts the bedrock is recalcitrant as teeth moor like to throw up what she thinks are startling images hanks of hair, scout’s woggle is that the boys’ voices in the tor-wind? she is deemed map-stuff, trespassed, plucked off oak, surly – one moor will out-do the others with beauty also: child murders, eagles, stubbed villages, ambi…

By The London Magazine

Poetry

Old mother moor

  is bitter – peat is the thinnest of comforts the bedrock is recalcit…

By The London Magazine

Panic

  A helicopter quarters the night sky, sets off alarms in my mind. Dow…

By The London Magazine

The Sandman

  Quiet: the poet is taking the stage. (Well, it’s not a stage, but a c…

By The London Magazine

White Building

  For Paul and Maya Between still life and low relief, the squared o…

By The London Magazine

Reviews

A Gamble with People and Money

  Summer Opera, 2017 (Glyndebourne Festival, The Grange Festival, Grange Park Festival at West Horsley, Garsington Opera at Wormsley, Opera Holland Park) 2017 was not a usual season of opera in our expanding list of British country-house theatres, which Opera magazine deplores. Take the weird choice offered by the Glyndebourne repertoire. No less than two of the three works getting ne…

By The London Magazine

Emotions Run Cool

  First Love, Gwendoline Riley, Granta, February 2017, £12.99, 176 pp. (hardcover) ‘How many boyfriends are treated like the father figure?’ This question, posed by the American author Chris Kraus on a recent segment on BBC Woman’s Hour discussing the work of Cathy Acker, was rhetorical: the answer is a great many. The cult success of Kraus’s re-issued I Love Dick (1997), an autobiogr…

By The London Magazine

The Hardship of the Voyage

  Night Sky with Exit Wounds, Ocean Vuong, Jonathan Cape, April 2017, £9.99, 96 pp. (paperback) Kumukanda, Kayo Chingonyi, Chatto & Windus, June 2017, £9.99, 64 pp. (paperback) Ocean Vuong’s Night Sky with Exit Wounds and Kayo Chingonyi’s Kumukanda explore journeys, family, and the bridges between cultures. Both poets left their countries of birth at a young age, travelling from …

By The London Magazine

Pagan Pleasures and Youthful Subjects

  On Pagham Beach, Photographs and Collages from the 1930s, Austin/Desmond Fine Art, London, 25 October - 8 December 2017 It is hard for those brought up in a world of gender fluidity, with debates about who has the right to use which bathroom, to imagine the veil of secrecy and repression that prevailed during the first half of the twentieth century around sexual encounters between m…

By The London Magazine

Writing

Old mother moor

  is bitter – peat is the thinnest of comforts the bedrock is recalcitrant as teeth moor like to throw up what she thinks are startling images hanks of hair, scout’s woggle is that the boys’ voices in the tor-wind? she is deemed map-stuff, trespassed, plucked off oak, surly – one moor will out-do the others with beauty also: child murders, eagles, stubbed villages, ambi…

By The London Magazine

A Walk Through Rackham Land

  Ideally, if you go into Rackham Land you should go on your own. Take a deep breath and walk. Don’t look for Rackham. Let him come to you. Walk until the brambles snag your right sleeve and the relish of a cool October wind comes sneaking through the thickets. This will be Rackham’s discreet hailing. The marches of Rackham Land are hemmed on three sides by fast roads. The fourth side…

By The London Magazine