TLM Issue

Poetry by Angela Kirby, Sandra Kolankiewicz, Patricia McCarthy, Satyajit Sarna, George Tardios and Jan Wiezorek Short Fiction by Hugh Dunkerley and Mohammed Keshavjee Featuring: Philip Hall on The Camino de Santiago Michael Karwowski on Edward Thomas Julian Mash on My London Jeffrey Meyers on Ernest Hemingway Tony Roberts on Ford Madox Ford Reviews by Houman Barekat, Claire Crowther, Sue Hubbard, Andrew Lambirth, Grevel Lindop, Simon Tait, Stuart Walton and Paul Williamson

Articles

Murkund and the Upholding of a Bureaucratic Machine

  Mukund breathed a sigh of relief as he left the immigration office in Dembe, capital of Babanya Letu. He had found his passport, which the immigration department had not even known they had lost. A less charitable individual would have viewed that as monumental incompetence, the inevitable collateral damage left by the wind of change that was blowing with such relentless force across t…

By Mohammed Keshavjee

Edward Ardizzone Wins his Place

  The occasion of both a major exhibition in a public museum and the publication of a monograph devoted to him is cause enough for a re- assessment of the career and achievements of Edward Ardizzone (1900- 79). The exhibition, at the House of Illustration in London’s booming King’s Cross quarter, ran from September to January, and was the first major retrospective in forty years. Why suc…

By Andrew Lambirth

Ford Madox Ford: ‘An Incurable and Dedicated Work of Fiction’

  ‘He sensed the virgin sucker at once. So we had the stories about Ruskin, and my Uncle Gabriel and my Aunt Christina [Ford claimed to be related to the Rossettis]; the Conrad and James stories; the story of the abbé Liszt’s concert and how Queen Alexandra took the beautiful infant Ford on her knees and kissed him; the ‘old Browning’ stories, and the Swinburne stories; gradually working b…

By Tony Roberts

In The Split Screen of the Heart

  What do you say when both here and two hundred ---------and twenty latitude degrees away no one lines up on the bottom of the sea ---------to rescue coral reefs, the coasts full of people driving, windows up and music on. ---------Once you ran to the waves the moment you arrived, squealing with pure delight below the ---------sharp cries of excited gulls, the tide out. …

By Sandra Kolankiewicz

Animated Machines

  Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany, Norman Ohler trans. Shaun Whiteside, Allen Lane, £8.99 (paperback) When the Nazi Wehrmacht finally bowed to the inevitable and surrendered to Allied forces in Europe on 8 May 1945, hostilities did not all immediately cease. Beneath the waters of the north Atlantic, pilots of the cramped submersibles that were all that was left of the Reich Navy went o…

By Stuart Walton

New England

  From neon-lit cheap motels you hear the plainsong of the highway – the dogs and wolves of the hills, a low hum of insects, the wails and violins of the night; shrieking axles of trucks turned south. In those screams is whalesong, the loneliness unbounded, all your sons driving through the dark, codfish, lobsters, crabs and clams, a thousand eyes staring into chipped ice, m…

By Satyajit Sarna

A Mosaic of Memories

  War and Turpentine, Stefan Hertmans trans. David McKay, Harvill Secker, 2016, £8.99 (paperback) ‘People from the age of Europe’s great catastrophes – how much sense can we make of them today?’This is the rhetorical question posed by the Flemish Belgian writer Stefan Hertmans in War and Turpentine, an affectionate and distinctly Sebaldian biography of his grandfather, Urbain Joseph E…

By Houman Barekat

My London

  Julian Mash is the author of Portobello Road: Lives of a Neighbourhood, published by Frances Lincoln. He is the literary programmer for End of the Road Festival and works in publishing. He was a recipient of a Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Award for Non-Fiction in 2013 and is currently working on his second book. This is the twentieth article in our regular series of “My London”.…

By Julian Mash

Many Realities

  Picasso Portraits, National Portrait Gallery, London, 6 October 2016 – 5 February 2017; Museu Picasso, Barcelona, 17 March – 25 June 2017. Curated by Elizabeth Cowling. How do you solve a problem like Picasso, with his legendary energy, his tremendous, seemingly immeasurable body of work, and phenomenal longevity? Examples of his industry, even in his very late years, are not hard t…

By Paul Williamson

October Wood

  Some niche: rested in planks with its own electric fingers hovering light to become our hands, caressing a mahogany thigh and making death through elemental cuts and saws. Here in the mist jays strain among wooden feeders and lichen stains like palms wrestling with backbone and clavicle. We are so strong until the cardinal shares seeds with mate. Then, we have …

By Jan Wiezorek

A Different Kind of Prison & Philomel

  They were always there at the window when I awoke, nostrils squashed against the pane, gnarled fingers tap-tap-tapping: macaques, threatening entry. As if they were the gaolers, myself in the cage of a foreign zoo. ‘Never look a rhesus monkey in the eye’, it was said. But I caught a stare that the Brahmin priests and sadhus warned was a dervish’s glare. Though a mosqu…

By Patricia McCarthy

Turmoil and Stillness

  Paul Nash, Tate Britain, London, until 5 March. When, in his 1943 book British Romantic Artists, John Piper included a painting by Paul Nash, Nash objected. ‘Romantic art, what is that?’ he responded. ‘Constable, Steer, Sickert Romantic painters?... when all is said I do not like the word Romantic applied to that which in its best and truest expression in England should be called Po…

By Simon Tait

Still

  Sometimes I feel you at my breast, warm against my skin, breathe in that familiar milkiness as I kiss the back of your neck. Or maybe we are standing at the side of a street, your hand in mine as I say look right, look left, right again, then wait until the green man walks before we cross. Now there you go, flat out on your first bike, yelling look at me, look at me and we’…

By Angela Kirby

Hemingway and the Gangsters

  Hemingway believed that insults could be crushed and arguments settled, gangland fashion, with menacing threats or physical violence. His friends agreed that he could be violent when crossed and angered. His sidekick Toby Bruce said he ‘could be as mean as a striped-assed ape’; the photographer Robert Capa stated, ‘Papa can be more severe than God on a rough day when the whole human ra…

By Jeffrey Meyers

How's your eldest? asked Andrew the barber.

  Daily unwanted meetings On the underground train His black brush of a moustache glistening (Obviously dyed). He’d told me Was usually confined in a room On his feet all day Trimming and sculpting hair like clay. Busy complaining, not listening His conversation always the same: “How’s your eldest?” I’d already told him I had no children. How many times? Then he disappeared.…

By George Tardios

Eduardo Paolozzi and the Borrowing of Art

  Walking from his Dovehouse Street studio on to the King’s Road to catch the number 19 bus to the Royal Academy of Arts on Piccadilly was very slow going indeed. True, my minotaur companion was not light on his feet, nor was he the spryest of septuagenarian escorts, but those facts alone did not make what should have been a five-minute journey stretch out to half an hour and beyond. He …

By Teresa Monachino

Talkin' 'bout my Generation

  Feminist Avant-Garde of the 1970s, from the Verbund Collection at The Photographers’ Gallery, 7 October to 15 January 2017 The day after the American election that put Donald J. Trump in the White House and the morning I heard of Leonard Cohen’s death, I went to the exhibition of 1970s feminist avant-garde photography at the Photographers’ Gallery. What a difference forty-odd years …

By Sue Hubbard

The Man who was Marked for Death

  The Rack: The Restored Edition, A.E Ellis, Ashgrove Publishing, 2010, £14.99 (paperback)   The Rack is a fugitive classic: a book that periodically reappears to great acclaim, only to lapse again into apparent oblivion. On first publication in 1958 it was unanimously hailed as a masterpiece; Graham Greene placed it alongside Great Expectations and Ulysses; Cyril Connolly ran…

By Grevel Lindop

Modest Modernists

  Slakki: New & Neglected Poems, Roy Fisher, Bloodaxe, 2016, £9.95 (paperback) Float, Anne Carson, Jonathan Cape 2016, £16.99 (paperback)   Roy Fisher’s new collection, Slakki, (Old Norse for a shallow depression among hills) looks calmly over a lifetime of neglect. Not by publishers, who have loved his poetry from the early 1960s: ‘The neglect has been entirely mine,’ …

By Claire Crowther

The Dilemma of Edward Thomas

If a death can be good then the poet Edward Thomas probably had one of the best. A casualty of the First World War, he died, aged just 39 years old, a century ago on the 9  April 1917. The date of his death just happened    to be Easter Monday, a day associated with rebirth. And Thomas’s poetry has certainly gone through any number of reinterpretations since it was written in a burst of creativi…

By Michael Karwowski

Stories from the Camino

  Communing on the Way On an icy ridge during a storm, a faithless priest cancelled mass. When a devout young farmer fought his way through the snow and entered the church, shaking himself off in the entrance, the priest was angry; now he would have to go ahead with the charade. But then, as he performed the mass, he looked into the chalice and saw that the wine had indeed turned into…

By Philip Hall

Essays

Ford Madox Ford: ‘An Incurable and Dedicated Work of Fiction’

  ‘He sensed the virgin sucker at once. So we had the stories about Ruskin, and my Uncle Gabriel and my Aunt Christina [Ford claimed to be related to the Rossettis]; the Conrad and James stories; the story of the abbé Liszt’s concert and how Queen Alexandra took the beautiful infant Ford on her knees and kissed him; the ‘old Browning’ stories, and the Swinburne stories; gradually working b…

By Tony Roberts

My London

  Julian Mash is the author of Portobello Road: Lives of a Neighbourhood, published by Frances Lincoln. He is the literary programmer for End of the Road Festival and works in publishing. He was a recipient of a Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Award for Non-Fiction in 2013 and is currently working on his second book. This is the twentieth article in our regular series of “My London”.…

By Julian Mash

Hemingway and the Gangsters

  Hemingway believed that insults could be crushed and arguments settled, gangland fashion, with menacing threats or physical violence. His friends agreed that he could be violent when crossed and angered. His sidekick Toby Bruce said he ‘could be as mean as a striped-assed ape’; the photographer Robert Capa stated, ‘Papa can be more severe than God on a rough day when the whole human ra…

By Jeffrey Meyers

Eduardo Paolozzi and the Borrowing of Art

  Walking from his Dovehouse Street studio on to the King’s Road to catch the number 19 bus to the Royal Academy of Arts on Piccadilly was very slow going indeed. True, my minotaur companion was not light on his feet, nor was he the spryest of septuagenarian escorts, but those facts alone did not make what should have been a five-minute journey stretch out to half an hour and beyond. He …

By Teresa Monachino

The Dilemma of Edward Thomas

If a death can be good then the poet Edward Thomas probably had one of the best. A casualty of the First World War, he died, aged just 39 years old, a century ago on the 9  April 1917. The date of his death just happened    to be Easter Monday, a day associated with rebirth. And Thomas’s poetry has certainly gone through any number of reinterpretations since it was written in a burst of creativi…

By Michael Karwowski

Stories from the Camino

  Communing on the Way On an icy ridge during a storm, a faithless priest cancelled mass. When a devout young farmer fought his way through the snow and entered the church, shaking himself off in the entrance, the priest was angry; now he would have to go ahead with the charade. But then, as he performed the mass, he looked into the chalice and saw that the wine had indeed turned into…

By Philip Hall

Fiction

Murkund and the Upholding of a Bureaucratic Machine

  Mukund breathed a sigh of relief as he left the immigration office in Dembe, capital of Babanya Letu. He had found his passport, which the immigration department had not even known they had lost. A less charitable individual would have viewed that as monumental incompetence, the inevitable collateral damage left by the wind of change that was blowing with such relentless force across t…

By Mohammed Keshavjee

Poetry

In The Split Screen of the Heart

  What do you say when both here and two hundred ---------and twenty la…

By Sandra Kolankiewicz

New England

  From neon-lit cheap motels you hear the plainsong of the highway – t…

By Satyajit Sarna

October Wood

  Some niche: rested in planks with its own electric fingers hoverin…

By Jan Wiezorek

A Different Kind of Prison & Philomel

  They were always there at the window when I awoke, nostrils squashed …

By Patricia McCarthy

Still

  Sometimes I feel you at my breast, warm against my skin, breathe in …

By Angela Kirby

How's your eldest? asked Andrew the barber.

  Daily unwanted meetings On the underground train His black brush of …

By George Tardios

Reviews

Edward Ardizzone Wins his Place

  The occasion of both a major exhibition in a public museum and the publication of a monograph devoted to him is cause enough for a re- assessment of the career and achievements of Edward Ardizzone (1900- 79). The exhibition, at the House of Illustration in London’s booming King’s Cross quarter, ran from September to January, and was the first major retrospective in forty years. Why suc…

By Andrew Lambirth

Animated Machines

  Blitzed: Drugs in Nazi Germany, Norman Ohler trans. Shaun Whiteside, Allen Lane, £8.99 (paperback) When the Nazi Wehrmacht finally bowed to the inevitable and surrendered to Allied forces in Europe on 8 May 1945, hostilities did not all immediately cease. Beneath the waters of the north Atlantic, pilots of the cramped submersibles that were all that was left of the Reich Navy went o…

By Stuart Walton

A Mosaic of Memories

  War and Turpentine, Stefan Hertmans trans. David McKay, Harvill Secker, 2016, £8.99 (paperback) ‘People from the age of Europe’s great catastrophes – how much sense can we make of them today?’This is the rhetorical question posed by the Flemish Belgian writer Stefan Hertmans in War and Turpentine, an affectionate and distinctly Sebaldian biography of his grandfather, Urbain Joseph E…

By Houman Barekat

Many Realities

  Picasso Portraits, National Portrait Gallery, London, 6 October 2016 – 5 February 2017; Museu Picasso, Barcelona, 17 March – 25 June 2017. Curated by Elizabeth Cowling. How do you solve a problem like Picasso, with his legendary energy, his tremendous, seemingly immeasurable body of work, and phenomenal longevity? Examples of his industry, even in his very late years, are not hard t…

By Paul Williamson

Turmoil and Stillness

  Paul Nash, Tate Britain, London, until 5 March. When, in his 1943 book British Romantic Artists, John Piper included a painting by Paul Nash, Nash objected. ‘Romantic art, what is that?’ he responded. ‘Constable, Steer, Sickert Romantic painters?... when all is said I do not like the word Romantic applied to that which in its best and truest expression in England should be called Po…

By Simon Tait

Talkin' 'bout my Generation

  Feminist Avant-Garde of the 1970s, from the Verbund Collection at The Photographers’ Gallery, 7 October to 15 January 2017 The day after the American election that put Donald J. Trump in the White House and the morning I heard of Leonard Cohen’s death, I went to the exhibition of 1970s feminist avant-garde photography at the Photographers’ Gallery. What a difference forty-odd years …

By Sue Hubbard

The Man who was Marked for Death

  The Rack: The Restored Edition, A.E Ellis, Ashgrove Publishing, 2010, £14.99 (paperback)   The Rack is a fugitive classic: a book that periodically reappears to great acclaim, only to lapse again into apparent oblivion. On first publication in 1958 it was unanimously hailed as a masterpiece; Graham Greene placed it alongside Great Expectations and Ulysses; Cyril Connolly ran…

By Grevel Lindop

Modest Modernists

  Slakki: New & Neglected Poems, Roy Fisher, Bloodaxe, 2016, £9.95 (paperback) Float, Anne Carson, Jonathan Cape 2016, £16.99 (paperback)   Roy Fisher’s new collection, Slakki, (Old Norse for a shallow depression among hills) looks calmly over a lifetime of neglect. Not by publishers, who have loved his poetry from the early 1960s: ‘The neglect has been entirely mine,’ …

By Claire Crowther