The Rain Horse by Ted Hughes

Ted Hughes The Rain Horse As the young man came over the hill the first thin blowing of rain met him. He turned his coat-collar up...

Interview | Amy Sackville

Back in March at the London Book Fair earlier this year, Vanessa Wheeler sat down with the author Amy Sackville to ask her about...

Fiction | On His Own Ground by Vis Nathan

  First published in the December 1976/January 1977 of The London Magazine (Volume 16, No.5) Gopal entered his cubby-hole surrounded by huge racks bulging with musty...

Archive | Fiction | Silvio by Arturo Vivante

  First published in the June 1970 edition of The London Magazine (Vol. 10, No. 3) Like a statue too finely carved, too finished and perfected,...

Fiction | The Word Necklace by Suzannah V. Evans

The word necklace was intricate, beautiful. When she put it on it felt light, beautiful, as if she were wearing coral, or air. The word...

Blessed Is the Road On Which You Are Travelling Today by...

You had never heard of the word until an hour ago, but already your designers are as familiar with the concept as they are...

Fiction | We Walk to Dissect by Laura Davis

There are bulls everywhere, a mass of black parading around the fence. The grass is yellower where their feet trample, the farmland is a...

Fiction | We Can Be Friends by Lauren Sarazen

There was a cluster of coats and hats careening over the railing, and when I got closer I could see what they were looking at. The basin, which had been full of water the last time I’d passed, was drained to the dregs and men in coveralls and tall rubber boots were crawling around in the sludge [...]

Next Boat from Douala by William Boyd

From The London Magazine Stories 11, 1979 Then the brothel was raided. Christ, he’d only gone down to Spinoza’s to confront Patience with her handiwork. She hadn’t...

Into the Blue by Alison Lock

A bee is trapped behind the curtains––its silhouette circles the head of a printed flower. Edith pulls her arm free of the tightly tucked...

Fiction | The Arrangement by Jennifer Johnson

There’s someone in the kitchen. I hear the kettle being filled. I look at the clock, it’s not yet seven, he’s up early. He...

Fiction | The Sinners’ Corner by Mark Sadler

I returned to work on a dismal Tuesday morning, emerging from the main entrance of London, Fenchurch Street, railway station under opaque grey skies....

A Glamorous Life by Karl Manders

IN THE SUMMER, while their shells are still a pale colour, you may eat the white kernels of unripe hazel nuts. You extract their...

Fiction | Jane Campbell — Schopenhauer and I

Robots could help solve social care crisis, say academics In the UK alone, 15,000 people are over 100 years of age and this figure will only increase. The robots will offer support with everyday tasks, like taking tablets, as well as offering companionship. — BBC News, 30th January 2017

The Golden Hour by Frances Gapper

That afternoon was a particularly trying one for Mary. Having changed her mother’s incontinence pad and left her on the sofa watching ‘Homes under...

Fiction | In Search of Scott by Will Kitson

Will Kitson In Search of Scott I remember the first time I read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s work. I was 20 years old, in the second year...

A Discrete Disclosure by Desmond King

Frank’s Englishness was all about him for he dressed in country wear:  tweed sports jackets, check shirts, Burberry rain macs, and a perpetual woollen...

Fascicle 41 by Anna McGrail

Winner of The London Magazine Short Story Competition 2015. Sometime between 1858 and 1864, Emily Dickinson embarked upon her self-publishing career. She copied out in...

Archive | Fiction | Let Them Call it Jazz by Jean...

One bright Sunday morning in July I have trouble with my Notting Hill landlord because he ask for a month’s rent in advance. He...

Fiction | Are There More People Alive Than Dead? by Laurane...

Laurane Marchive Are There More People Alive Than Dead? The phone rings. 5am. It’s your boyfriend. He is in New York so with the time difference,...

Fiction | The Mercedes by Anna Kavan

Anna Kavan (name at birth Helen Woods) is most famous for the psychological, otherworldly fiction of Asylum Piece (1940) and Ice (1967), and was...

Fiction | The Interpreter of Dreams and Maladies by Mark Budman

Mark Budman The Interpreter of Dreams and Maladies I. Stick Figures in Paradise The interpreter of dreams and maladies draws a stick figure with an orange crayon....

Fiction | Beloved by Roger Raynal

  That morning, when Ryoji woke up, fired from sleep by a strident, but usual sound, he refrained from opening his eyes. He wanted to...

Fiction | The Bone Mole by Ed Cottrell

Ed Cottrell The Bone Mole ———There was a little bone mole for sale, a carving of a mole made of bone. It caught my eye sitting...

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