Flowers by Mark Godfrey

She communicates through flowers. Daffodils are for happiness, carnations for sadness, snowdrops mean hope and tulips stand for strength. She saves dahlias for saints’...

Fiction | The Sinners’ Corner by Mark Sadler

I returned to work on a dismal Tuesday morning, emerging from the main entrance of London, Fenchurch Street, railway station under opaque grey skies....

Fiction | Sylvia Plath Watches Us Sleep, But We Don’t Mind...

Sylvia Plath Watched Us Sleep, But We Don't Mind was the third prize winner in our Short Story Competition 2017. We’ve been married three years...

Fiction | Mr. Cahill by William Roberts

  The little party wandered slowly along the rows of the hillside garden, pausing in the warm afternoon Northern California sun to examine one vegetable...

Extract | Mnemic Symbols by Andrew Hodgson

  The following is an extract from Andrew Hodgson's novel Mnemic Symbols (Dostoyevsky Wannabe, 2019). For more information, visit Dostoyevsky Wannabe. Andrew Hodgson Mnemic Symbols Two, ‘As I’ve told...

Archive | Fiction | Let Them Call it Jazz by Jean...

One bright Sunday morning in July I have trouble with my Notting Hill landlord because he ask for a month’s rent in advance. He...

Fiction | We Walk to Dissect by Laura Davis

There are bulls everywhere, a mass of black parading around the fence. The grass is yellower where their feet trample, the farmland is a...

Fiction | Asma by Dur e Aziz Amna

Dur e Aziz Amna received second prize in our Short Story Competition 2017.  The year Asma moved in with us, we were living in a two-family...

Fiction | The Bone Mole by Ed Cottrell

Ed Cottrell The Bone Mole ———There was a little bone mole for sale, a carving of a mole made of bone. It caught my eye sitting...

Fiction | Are There More People Alive Than Dead? by Laurane...

Laurane Marchive Are There More People Alive Than Dead? The phone rings. 5am. It’s your boyfriend. He is in New York so with the time difference,...

Interview | Amy Sackville

Back in March at the London Book Fair earlier this year, Vanessa Wheeler sat down with the author Amy Sackville to ask her about...

Fascicle 41 by Anna McGrail

Winner of The London Magazine Short Story Competition 2015. Sometime between 1858 and 1864, Emily Dickinson embarked upon her self-publishing career. She copied out in...

Fiction | Quiet Mountain by Sally Jubb

They got on at Vico Equense. The carriage was almost full, but the two of them managed to squeeze into a seat diagonally opposite,...

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Fiction | The Mercedes by Anna Kavan

Anna Kavan (name at birth Helen Woods) is most famous for the psychological, otherworldly fiction of Asylum Piece (1940) and Ice (1967), and was...

Blessed Is the Road On Which You Are Travelling Today by...

You had never heard of the word until an hour ago, but already your designers are as familiar with the concept as they are...

Fiction | The Prisoner by Tammye Huf

Tammye Huf The Prisoner I set my alarm clock for midnight, because at one in the morning we wanted to slaughter.  It rang muffled, under my...

The Golden Hour by Frances Gapper

That afternoon was a particularly trying one for Mary. Having changed her mother’s incontinence pad and left her on the sofa watching ‘Homes under...

Into the Blue by Alison Lock

A bee is trapped behind the curtains––its silhouette circles the head of a printed flower. Edith pulls her arm free of the tightly tucked...

Spotlight V: Journals Edition | LE GUN / Hotel

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Archive | Leaving School—XI by Ann Quin

The following piece by the post-war experimental writer Ann Quin (1936-1973) was originally published in the July 1966 issue of The London Magazine, but...

Fiction | We Can Be Friends by Lauren Sarazen

There was a cluster of coats and hats careening over the railing, and when I got closer I could see what they were looking at. The basin, which had been full of water the last time I’d passed, was drained to the dregs and men in coveralls and tall rubber boots were crawling around in the sludge [...]

Interview | David Keenan | For The Good Times

After a career as a music writer spanning more than 20 years, David Keenan released his first novel This Is Memorial Device in 2017,...

Fiction | Just for Five Minutes by Alla Melenteva

It was an early May day. The war was considered over, though it had not yet been officially declared. A Russian junior lieutenant went...

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