Fiction | Sylvia Plath Watches Us Sleep, But We Don’t Mind...

'Sylvia Plath Watches Us Sleep, But We Don't Mind' was the third prize winner in our Short Story Competition 2017. We’ve been married three years...

Archive | Fiction | Let Them Call it Jazz by Jean...

One bright Sunday morning in July I have trouble with my Notting Hill landlord because he ask for a month’s rent in advance. He...

Fiction | The Root of it All by Charlotte Newman

  Pavements slick from rain and a market at night, risen dripping from the oily roads like a brand new continent. Brunch alongside nails alongside...

Fiction | The Golden Eel by Neil Burns

It had been twenty years since they last met. Thirty eight year old Eoghan O’Dullach was nervous inside; and in his brain he was...

Fiction | Diasporic Guilt by Mohamed Keshavjee

‘Shoeshine, sir?’ asked the young lad with a shoeshine box in his hand, as I peered into the window of a shop in New...

The Rat by Hannah Lowe

The landlady watches herself in the living room mirror, phone held to her ear. In the blurred morning light her face looks young again,...

Interview | David Keenan | For The Good Times

After a career as a music writer spanning more than 20 years, David Keenan released his first novel This Is Memorial Device in 2017,...

Fiction | The Sinners’ Corner by Mark Sadler

I returned to work on a dismal Tuesday morning, emerging from the main entrance of London, Fenchurch Street, railway station under opaque grey skies....

Fiction | The Mercedes by Anna Kavan

For some reason taxis are always scarce in my district. Late on a wet night, the few there were would certainly be engaged, if their drivers weren’t already sitting comfortably at home in the warm. So I was worried about getting one for M, who’d looked in earlier in the evening on his way to visit a patient. He’d seemed quite happy talking about the wonderful big Mercedes he was going to buy as soon as he had enough money, and the wonderful time we were going [...]

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Fiction | Crete by Cameron Stewart

‘So. What do we want today?’ I’m sitting in my local barbers chair, caped up like a clown - my head bulging through the top...

Flowers by Mark Godfrey

She communicates through flowers. Daffodils are for happiness, carnations for sadness, snowdrops mean hope and tulips stand for strength. She saves dahlias for saints’...

Fascicle 41 by Anna McGrail

Winner of The London Magazine Short Story Competition 2015. Sometime between 1858 and 1864, Emily Dickinson embarked upon her self-publishing career. She copied out in...

The e-Shadow by Rhys Timson

It was three weeks into Kurt’s big adventure that his digital self was stolen. Before that, everything had been going to plan. He’d been...

Fiction | Just for Five Minutes by Alla Melenteva

It was an early May day. The war was considered over, though it had not yet been officially declared. A Russian junior lieutenant went...

Fiction | An Actor in the Wings: Notes (1980 – 2009)...

Charles I could see him from beside the door. He was surrounded by men in suits, pointing at the ceiling, looking at their drinks or...

Interview | Amy Sackville

Back in March at the London Book Fair earlier this year, Vanessa Wheeler sat down with the author Amy Sackville to ask her about...

Fiction | The Old Men Who Row Boats by David Joseph

In Madrid, not far from the great museums that line the streets, old men row boats in the morning hours at Retiro Park. These...

Fiction | Mr. Cahill by William Roberts

  The little party wandered slowly along the rows of the hillside garden, pausing in the warm afternoon Northern California sun to examine one vegetable...

Next Boat from Douala by William Boyd

From The London Magazine Stories 11, 1979 Then the brothel was raided. Christ, he’d only gone down to Spinoza’s to confront Patience with her handiwork. She hadn’t...

Into the Blue by Alison Lock

A bee is trapped behind the curtains––its silhouette circles the head of a printed flower. Edith pulls her arm free of the tightly tucked...

News | The Republic of Consciousness Prize for Small Presses 2019

Last night the winners of The Republic of Consciousness Prize for Small Presses were announced, with this year’s announcement signalling a re-structuring of the...

The Soviet Prom by Neil Herrington

  Wednesday, 21 August 1968   The moment you and Slava enter the dining room, he throws himself on the first person he sees, kisses both of...

Fiction | The Interpreter of Dreams and Maladies by Mark Budman

Mark Budman The Interpreter of Dreams and Maladies I. Stick Figures in Paradise The interpreter of dreams and maladies draws a stick figure with an orange crayon....

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