Fiction | On His Own Ground by Vis Nathan

  First published in the December 1976/January 1977 of The London Magazine (Volume 16, No.5) Gopal entered his cubby-hole surrounded by huge racks bulging with musty...

Fiction | Just for Five Minutes by Alla Melenteva

It was an early May day. The war was considered over, though it had not yet been officially declared. A Russian junior lieutenant went...

Fiction | The Word Necklace by Suzannah V. Evans

The word necklace was intricate, beautiful. When she put it on it felt light, beautiful, as if she were wearing coral, or air. The word...

Fiction | A Third Presence by Nadine Gordimer

When Rose and Naomi, daughters of poor Rasovsky the tailor, left school in the same year there was no discussion about what they should...

Fiction | Alone with the Tide by John Saul

At last. Dismissing all fiction, I come clean. The figure coming into focus, in that smart black and grey coat, unbuttoned, collar up, is...

Fiction | Quiet Mountain by Sally Jubb

They got on at Vico Equense. The carriage was almost full, but the two of them managed to squeeze into a seat diagonally opposite,...

Fiction | The Old Men Who Row Boats by David Joseph

In Madrid, not far from the great museums that line the streets, old men row boats in the morning hours at Retiro Park. These...

Fiction | About You by Marjorie Main

Early on a Saturday morning in October I met Vivian at Liverpool Street Station. Stevie had a painting in an exhibition opening that night,...

Fiction | Beloved by Roger Raynal

  That morning, when Ryoji woke up, fired from sleep by a strident, but usual sound, he refrained from opening his eyes. He wanted to...

Fiction | We Walk to Dissect by Laura Davis

There are bulls everywhere, a mass of black parading around the fence. The grass is yellower where their feet trample, the farmland is a...

Fiction | The Sinners’ Corner by Mark Sadler

I returned to work on a dismal Tuesday morning, emerging from the main entrance of London, Fenchurch Street, railway station under opaque grey skies....

Fiction | Sylvia Plath Watches Us Sleep, But We Don’t Mind...

Sylvia Plath Watched Us Sleep, But We Don't Mind was the third prize winner in our Short Story Competition 2017. We’ve been married three years...

Fiction | Mr. Cahill by William Roberts

  The little party wandered slowly along the rows of the hillside garden, pausing in the warm afternoon Northern California sun to examine one vegetable...

Fiction | Asma by Dur e Aziz Amna

Dur e Aziz Amna received second prize in our Short Story Competition 2017.  The year Asma moved in with us, we were living in a two-family...

Fiction | Crete by Cameron Stewart

‘So. What do we want today?’ I’m sitting in my local barbers chair, caped up like a clown - my head bulging through the top...

Fiction | The Arrangement by Jennifer Johnson

There’s someone in the kitchen. I hear the kettle being filled. I look at the clock, it’s not yet seven, he’s up early. He...

Fiction | The Golden Eel by Neil Burns

It had been twenty years since they last met. Thirty eight year old Eoghan O’Dullach was nervous inside; and in his brain he was...

Fiction | The Root of it All by Charlotte Newman

  Pavements slick from rain and a market at night, risen dripping from the oily roads like a brand new continent. Brunch alongside nails alongside...

Fiction | An Actor in the Wings: Notes (1980 – 2009)...

Charles I could see him from beside the door. He was surrounded by men in suits, pointing at the ceiling, looking at their drinks or...

Fiction | Diasporic Guilt by Mohamed Keshavjee

‘Shoeshine, sir?’ asked the young lad with a shoeshine box in his hand, as I peered into the window of a shop in New...

The e-Shadow by Rhys Timson

It was three weeks into Kurt’s big adventure that his digital self was stolen. Before that, everything had been going to plan. He’d been...

Fascicle 41 by Anna McGrail

Winner of The London Magazine Short Story Competition 2015. Sometime between 1858 and 1864, Emily Dickinson embarked upon her self-publishing career. She copied out in...

The Rain Horse by Ted Hughes

 As the young man came over the hill the first thin blowing of rain met him. He turned his coat-collar up and stood on...

The Rat by Hannah Lowe

The landlady watches herself in the living room mirror, phone held to her ear. In the blurred morning light her face looks young again,...

DON'T MISS OUT

The latest content, freebies, news and competition updates, right to your inbox.

You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us, or by contacting us at info@thelondonmagazine.org. Find our privacy policies and terms of use here, or at the bottom of all pages of the website.