Spotlight III: Influx Press

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Review | Kiss My Genders & Urban Impulses: Latin American Photography...

Art endows people with the power to take control of their self-expression, to create themselves and identify themselves in a manner unadulterated by social...

The Human Factor v Matisse by Richard Warburton

The Southbank Centre is currently hosting the emetic Festival of Love under whose banner falls a twenty five year retrospective, The Human Factor. On...

Book Launch at Enitharmon: Stephen Romer and Alan Jenkins

The light, bright space of Enitharmon bookshop in Bloomsbury was filled with jostlings and murmurings as more and more people tried to fit into...

Review | The Anointed by Michael Arditti

For contemporary fiction to stay pertinent in the twenty-first century, it must continue to do what great novelists have always striven to do: challenge, interpret, and risk offence. Michael Arditti’s new novel The Anointed challenges the ultimate orthodoxy, the Bible – in particular, the ancient tales of the Old Testament, which have endured for thousands of years, despite their capriciousness and morals archaic to the modern reader [...]

Review | Seen by your fingertips: Queen Mob’s Tea House and...

Anyone who thinks fiction and poetry are dying art forms needs to stay at home and get online more. As Russell Bennetts wrote in The Digital Critic ‘the revolution might not be televised, but will almost certainly be seen by your fingertips.’ Bennetts’s two literary websites [...]

Review | Women Talking by Miriam Toews

It seems ironic that a work so concerned with the female voice should be written from a man's perspective. But this is the contradiction...
The Fear of Breathing

The Fear of Breathing. By James Denselow

Over sixteen months into the unrest in Syria a true picture of events on the ground is still hard to ascertain. This is partly...

Review | In the Dream House by Carmen Maria Machado

People, generally speaking, do not want to read a memoir on abuse. It’s not that readers do not care for the subject; in fact, caring is what makes it hard. Carmen Maria Machado’s In the Dream House is noteworthy for many reasons, but for this most of all: Machado will keep you reading when you most want to turn away. Three hundred or so pages packed with emotional manipulation and physical terror is, unsurprisingly, a challenge for readers [...]

Purity by Jonathan Franzen

Jonathan Franzen likes big books. Each one of his critically acclaimed works are weighty door-stoppers but their tangible size in no way matches the...

Review | Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War at the British Library

Anglo-Saxon England, which lasted from the 5th to the 11th centuries, a span two-hundred years longer than the Roman occupation, nevertheless occupies a much...

Review | William Blake at Tate Britain

Thought to be mad by Wordsworth but considered a genius by Coleridge, William Blake (1757 - 1827) was an oddity during his lifetime — a genius engraver of images with a penchant for public nudity and political radicalism, a poet who would break off [...]

Review | The Sweet Indifference of the World by Peter Stamm

Christoph and Magdalena. Chris and Lena. Peter Stamm’s latest novel, The Sweet Indifference of the World, is a short, sophisticated tale for the post-truth era, in which four identities become irreparably intertwined. Our narrator, the middle-aged Christoph, invites a young woman named Lena to meet him in a Swedish cemetery: ‘I hadn’t left any number or address, only a time and a place and my first name: Please come to Skogskyrkogården tomorrow at two [...]

Kamal Boullata – And There Was Light

This autumn the Berloni gallery presents the first London exhibition of Palestinian artist Kamal Boullata’s work since 1978.  The acclaimed artist who is known...

Picasso Portraits: Humour is Key

The exhibition at London’s National Portrait Gallery differs from William Rubin’s one on Picasso’s portraits twenty years ago at MOMA by defining Picasso’s portraits...

America after the Fall at Royal Academy of Arts

Organised by the Art Institute of Chicago, the Musée de l’Orangerie in Paris and the London Royal Academy of Arts, 'America After the Fall:...

Picasso Sculptures at Musée National Picasso-Paris

Picasso Sculpture opened to great acclaim last September at New York’s Museum of Modern Art before moving to the Musée National Picasso-Paris and is...

Review | ArtCircle’s Focusing Space at 48 Albermarle Street

On entering the doorway of 48 Albemarle Street and walking up its makeshift staircase of simple wooden boards you are taken into a world...

The Modern Eye – Edvard Munch exhibition at Tate Modern

‘Without anxiety and sickness I would have been a rudderless ship…’– E. Munch At any given time of the year, somewhere on the continent, there...

Review | Red at Wyndham’s Theatre

Walking into the Wyndham, the stage takes you by surprise. Alfred Molina sits unmoving, back to the audience, staring fixedly at one of the...

Review | Burning Woman by Lucy H. Pearce

Briony WillisBurning Woman Burning Woman, by Lucy H. Pearce, Womancraft Publishing, pp. 240, £10.99 (paperback) Designed to teach, inspire and empower generations of women who suffer from a deep...

The Trials of Oscar Wilde, Trafalgar Studios II

The Trials of Oscar Wilde is currently showing for its last week at Trafalgar Studios, formerly Whitehall Theatre. It is co-written by John O’Connor...

Review | Phyllida Barlow at Royal Academy

I’ve collected driftwood from beaches for years. A particularly large piece hangs by the door to my house. Every time I enter, my fingertips...

Review | Emotive Brutes at Trate Studios

Far from the crowded and anxious streets of a city that has made insomnia the rule, sits the rare exception, Emotive Brutes, a solo...

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