Review | Green Noise by Jean Sprackland

Green Noise, Jean Sprackland, Jonathan Cape, 2018, 64pp, £10.00 With Green Noise, the fifth collection from Jean Sprackland, she attunes us to a planetary resonance. Many of...

Defining the Unfinished – Works from The Courtauld Gallery

Unfinished…Works from The Courtauld Gallery Summer Showcase Special Display 18th June-20th September 2015 Unfinished masterpieces tend only to come to light upon the artist’s death,...

The Museum of Innocence

The Museum of Innocence at Somerset House, 27 January – 3 April 2016 The Museum of Innocence offers the visitor a little corner of 1970s Istanbul, hidden...

Review | Nan Goldin & Jenny Holzer at Tate Modern

In two exhibitions by Jenny Holzer and Nan Goldin currently on display at the Tate Modern we are presented by two collections of socially...

Bram Bogart at the Saatchi Gallery

SALON, Saatchi Gallery’s commercial exhibition space, launched earlier this year with a fascinating show by the post-war Japanese artist, Tsuyoshi Maekawa, and in keeping...
The Artist – Stephen B Whatley with Amanda C.Dickie, publicist at Westminster Cathedral Preview

Paintings From Prayer

Stephen B Whatley’s work is featured on our August/September front cover and on Thursday I went to his private preview entitled ‘Paintings From Prayer’...

The Red and Yellow Nothing by Jay Bernard

It is difficult to put a finger on the immediate aftermath of reading The Red and Yellow Nothing: there is puzzlement, rage, and wonder,...

The Trials of Oscar Wilde, Trafalgar Studios II

The Trials of Oscar Wilde is currently showing for its last week at Trafalgar Studios, formerly Whitehall Theatre. It is co-written by John O’Connor...

Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins

The American West has always been home to grifters and thieves, dreamers and doers. It has been a destination for the misfits, for the...

Iain Sinclair and Will Self on Walking London

I’ve got a new eternal certainty to file alongside death and taxes: if you walk around London enough, and you know what he looks...

Review | Exhilarating Magus: Myth and Poetics in Stephen Yenser’s Stone...

Stone Fruit, Stephen Yenser’s highly anticipated third collection published by Waywiser, dazzles, delights, and enchants with its wordplay, predilection for sound effects, and linguistic...

La Bohème at The Cutty Sark

Puccini’s La Boheme has long elicited a powerful emotional response from its audiences, but rarely have the cast been close enough to see its...

Aeneid Book VI by Seamus Heaney

Faber’s publication of Heaney’s translation of Book VI of the Aeneid pays testament to the enduring poetic prowess of its translator. His posthumous connection...

Review | The King and the Catholics: The Fight for Rights...

In an age which has sidelined the Christian faith, the long, bitterly contested campaign to remove the serious discrimination suffered by Roman Catholics in...

No Map Could Show Them by Helen Mort

No Map Could Show Them, Mort’s second collection, explores the narratives of Victorian and modern women –mountaineers, campaigners, runners – and considers, more broadly,...

Review | Counterpoint at the Stanley Spencer Gallery

Considered one of Britain’s most significant artists Stanley Spencer is famous for his singular vision, but Counterpoint sets out to demonstrate that he was part...

Review | The Pleasures of Queuing by Erik Martiny

Erik Martiny The Pleasures of Queueing Mastodon Publishing 2018 ISBN 978-1-7320091-1-0 In chapter 13 of his very funny and entirely absorbing novel, Erik Martiny has his narrator and...

The Bonniest Companie by Kathleen Jamie

Walking and climbing in a landscape of clifftops, glens, summits and strands, the speaker in Kathleen Jamie’s subtle and assured seventh collection journeys through...

white – a project by Edmund de Waal

white - a project by Edmund de Waal at The Royal Academy of Arts until 3 January 2016 White has obsessed Edmund de Waal since he made his...

Review | The Essence of Things at 48 Albemarle Street

Arriving at 48 Albemarle Street you immediately enter a stripped-back environment; surrounded by exposed brick, wood and metal. This industrial interior makes a refreshing...

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood

In 2009, Ursula K. Le Guin caused something of a stir in the science-fiction community by contradicting Atwood’s claim that her novels belonged to...

Review | Bindlestiff by Wayne Holloway

2036. In a ramshackle, backwater United States, Marine Corps vet Frank Dubois journeys from L.A. to Detroit, seeking redemption for a life lived off...

Review | Group Hat and How Chicago! Imagists 1960s & 70s...

The waves come and go, breaking on the shore at their own singular pace. Grains of sand become whole under their release, imagination finding...

Review | Limbo by Dan Fox

Following on from his brilliant attack on intellectual conservatism in 2016's Pretentiousness: Why It Matters, Dan Fox's new long-form essay Limbo finds the frieze editor all...

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