Review | Big Love by Balla & The Night Circus and...

Though Balla, one of Slovakia’s most prominent contemporary novelists, has been compared to Kafka, he might more reasonably be called a nihilistic Etgar Keret (Israeli author of The Nimrod Flipout and multiple other collections of surreal short stories), given the thoroughly ironic [...]

Review | Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know by Colm Tóibín

Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know: The Fathers of Wilde, Yeats and Joyce, Colm Tóibín, Viking, 2018, pp.192, £14.99Strolling through the Dublin where he once studied,...

The Matter that Doesn’t Matter – Hill of Doors by Robin...

‘He’s back in the ghost house where he, himself, is the ghost.’ (‘Broken’) ‘sending her long arrows in flight through the standing pines as if threading nets in...

Review | The Ink Trade by Anthony Burgess, Edited by Will...

 Even though Burgess was an ‘enormously prolific journalist’, he is dominantly known for his controversial, cult classic A Clockwork Orange (1962). But you will...

Review| The Letters Page Vol.2 published by Book Ex Machina

To pick up a book, writes Ioanna Mavrou, is ‘as if stepping out of the world for a beat and taking a much needed...

V&A Korean Collection: Chun Kwang Young: Aggregation10-SE032RED: 2010

Chun Kwang Young’s work mixes the traditional, through the use of customary Korean mulberry paper known as hanji paper, with contemporary style, as the...

Hot Milk by Deborah Levy

What do we think of when we think of myths? For children, myths are something unquestionable and magical. They present a world removed from...

The Red Barn at The National Theatre

In a recent interview with The Times, acclaimed theatre director Robin Icke said that he walks out of shows at the interval ‘all the...

Review | Underland by Robert Macfarlane

How should writers respond to the ecological crisis? Both 'crisis' and the much-contested term ‘Anthropocene’ appear to bring us to the brink: there is, they tell us, no return to a state of innocence. If the possibility of an alternative future ever existed (and some claim it never did), then now it must be foregone [...]

Review | After the Formalities by Anthony Anaxagorou

In ‘Cause’, the second poem in Anthony Anaxagorou’s collection After the Formalities, the poet reclaims the phrase ‘flames lambent’ – an image taken from Enoch Powell’s ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech and quoted by historian David Starkey in a 2011 interview following the London riots – for poetry [...]

Review | The Book of Joan by Lidia Yukavitch | H(a)ppy...

H(a)ppy, Nicola Barker, William Heinemann, 2017The Book of Joan, Lidia Yuknavitch, Canongate, 2018 In Nicola Barker’s H(a)ppy and Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Book of Joan, we have two novels...

Review | The Lieutenant of Inishmore at Noël Coward Theatre

For his West End debut, Aiden Turner, star of BBC’s hit TV show Poldark, had huge expectations to fill. Written by Martin McDonagh, director...

New Voices from the Tower Hamlets Schools

SLAMbassadors Showcase, 14th July 2016Close your eyes, and try to remember the last time a thirteen-year-old implored you to 'rise up and change the...

Review | Edvard Munch: Love and Angst at the British Museum

Known for the haunting anguish of The Scream, Norwegian painter and printmaker Edvard Munch produced less notorious pieces with a similar apocalyptic gloom. The...

Review | Krzysztof Gil: Welcome to the Country Where the Gypsy...

On view at l’étrangère gallery in East London is the first ever UK solo exhibition by the Polish Roma artist Krzysztof Gil. Entitled Welcome...

The Human Factor v Matisse by Richard Warburton

The Southbank Centre is currently hosting the emetic Festival of Love under whose banner falls a twenty five year retrospective, The Human Factor. On...

Review | Abuse II, The Uncanny by Alessio Bolzoni

At first you see the bodies and ask yourself why – that is how the story begins, how the narrative unravels, how you are...

Measures of Expatriation by Vahni Capildeo

Vahni Capildeo said in a 2012 interview with Zannab Sheikh that ‘poetry is a form of concentration’. Her latest collection, Measures of Expatriation, puts...

Review | Fatherland at the Lyric Hammersmith

The coats stand out in the exhilarating performance piece Fatherland now on at the Lyric, Hammersmith after its premiere in the Manchester International Festival...

Review | Medusa at Sadler’s Wells Theatre

Briony WillisMedusa Through beautifully poetic movements and engaging drama, Jasmin Vardimon has created a unique choreographic voice that enables her to explore deeply controversial social...

Sargent: The Watercolours at the Dulwich Picture Gallery

John Singer Sargent is best known as a painter of portraits in oil. Since childhood, however, he was also a keen watercolorist, and a...

Review | The Built Environment by Emily Hasler

Poetry is not a mass market – perhaps thanks to its reputation for being stylistically obscure and frequently focused on nebulous and intangible subjects...

The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel

The High Mountains of Portugal is not a traditional novel but instead a set of three interconnected tales that take place over the course...

Book Launch at Enitharmon: Stephen Romer and Alan Jenkins

The light, bright space of Enitharmon bookshop in Bloomsbury was filled with jostlings and murmurings as more and more people tried to fit into...

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