Review | Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know by Colm Tóibín

Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know: The Fathers of Wilde, Yeats and Joyce, Colm Tóibín, Viking, 2018, pp.192, £14.99 Strolling through the Dublin where he once studied,...

What is Not Yours is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi

In a museful snippet-cum-travelogue published by Lenny Letter earlier this month, Helen Oyeyemi detailed the auto-didacticism that characterized her first visit to Prague, where...
University of Calcutta by wikimedia.org is licensed under CC BY 2.0

Calcutta by Amit Chaudhuri

Calcutta: Two Years in the City, Amit Chaudhuri, Union Books, 2013, 320pp, £16.99, (Hardback)   The modern megacity is characterised by head-aching enigmas and unbridgeable contradictions....

Review | Calder on Paper: 1960 – 1976 at the Saatchi...

  SALON, Saatchi Gallery’s commercial exhibition space, launched earlier this year aiming to present the work of leading international artists who have had limited exposure...

Review | Alvin Ailey Dance Theater Company at Sadler’s Wells

I first saw the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater Company during a visit to New York between Christmas and New Year in the mid-90s. I was entranced by the troupe and have never since missed a chance [...]

La Bohème at The Cutty Sark

Puccini’s La Boheme has long elicited a powerful emotional response from its audiences, but rarely have the cast been close enough to see its...

Mothering Sunday by Graham Swift

… And could she disentangle it, the stuff she’d seen in her mind’s eye, from the actual stuff of her own life? In 1935, fleeing...

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood

In 2009, Ursula K. Le Guin caused something of a stir in the science-fiction community by contradicting Atwood’s claim that her novels belonged to...

A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

Lauded as a subversive masterpiece, pegged as a favourite to win The Man Booker Prize and one of the best-selling novels of 2015, A Little...

The Bonniest Companie by Kathleen Jamie

Walking and climbing in a landscape of clifftops, glens, summits and strands, the speaker in Kathleen Jamie’s subtle and assured seventh collection journeys through...

Review | Exhilarating Magus: Myth and Poetics in Stephen Yenser’s Stone...

Stone Fruit, Stephen Yenser’s highly anticipated third collection published by Waywiser, dazzles, delights, and enchants with its wordplay, predilection for sound effects, and linguistic...

Review | Fatherland at the Lyric Hammersmith

The coats stand out in the exhilarating performance piece Fatherland now on at the Lyric, Hammersmith after its premiere in the Manchester International Festival...

The Modern Eye – Edvard Munch exhibition at Tate Modern

‘Without anxiety and sickness I would have been a rudderless ship…’ – E. Munch At any given time of the year, somewhere on the continent, there...

Review | The Fallen by Carlos Manuel Álvarez

The Fallen is only 136 pages long, but it bursts with resounding voices of unbridled pain. Carlos Manuel Álvarez’s polyphonic novel takes us across a Cuban family, each member with individual chapters — the son, the daughter, the mother, the father [...]

Resurrection by Jessica Albarn – Lawrence Alkin Gallery

If you were wondering where all the bees had gone, look no further than Jessica Albarn’s remarkable exhibition Resurrection, which is showing at the...

Picasso Portraits: Humour is Key

The exhibition at London’s National Portrait Gallery differs from William Rubin’s one on Picasso’s portraits twenty years ago at MOMA by defining Picasso’s portraits...

Review | Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard

Sue Hubbard’s Rainsongs has a unique and beautiful emotive quality that shines through its delicately constructed prose in a love-letter to Ireland, memory and parenthood,...

Review | Charlotte Prodger and Forensic Architecture — The Turner Prize...

In The War of Desire and Technology at the Close of the Mechanical Age, Allucquére  Roseanne Stone discusses how our consciousness is altered by...

Review | Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy at the Tate Modern

If you’ve ever doubted the sheer scale of Picasso’s productivity, a visit to the Tate Modern’s latest exhibition will convince you of the artist’s...

A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing | The Young Vic

Aoife Duffin reprises her one-woman performance for the production's London début. In Annie Ryan’s adaptation of Eimear McBride’s 2013 novel, A Girl is a Half-Formed...

Review | Out of the Woods by Luke Turner

Out of the Woods, the first book by Luke Turner, begins with the breakdown of a five year relationship with his girlfriend, caused by...

Review | Killed Negatives at Whitechapel Gallery

A woman slumps at a table, one eye guarded and watchful, the other replaced by a perfect circle of blackness. In the frame next...

Review | The Pleasures of Queuing by Erik Martiny

Erik Martiny The Pleasures of Queueing Mastodon Publishing 2018 ISBN 978-1-7320091-1-0 In chapter 13 of his very funny and entirely absorbing novel, Erik Martiny has his narrator and...

Review | Xeixa: Fourteen Catalan Poets

Xeixa: Fourteen Catalan Poets Tupelo Press, 2018, edited by Marlon L. Fick and Francisca Esteve The news in recent months has been splashed with images of...

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