Review | Florida by Lauren Groff

A recurring character binds the eleven stories in Lauren Groff’s Florida. Sometimes she is narrator and protagonist. Some of the stories never mention her—...

Review | Killed Negatives at Whitechapel Gallery

A woman slumps at a table, one eye guarded and watchful, the other replaced by a perfect circle of blackness. In the frame next...

Review | A Dark and Stormy Night by Tom Stacey

In this new novel by Tom Stacey, our narrator, the Anglican priest Simon Chance, is lost. Lost in his thoughts, yes, for this stream-of-consciousness...

Review | The New Generation of ‘Instagram Poets’ And Their Fierce,...

In November 2014, a courageous 21 year-old woman self-published her first collection of poetry. The arresting poems that filled the pages revealed her experience...

Review | The Map of Salt and Stars by Jennifer Zeynab...

In this beautifully nuanced debut novel from Syrian American author, Jennifer Zeynab Joukhadar, two parallel journeys alternate with and counter each other, highlighting the...

Review | The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh

The Water Cure, Sophie Mackintosh Hamish Hamilton, 2018 256 pp, £12.99 (hardback) False utopias, and their human cost, are at the core of Sophie Mackintosh’s uneasy, hypnotic...

Essay | Meg Wolitzer’s #MeToo Moment by Sophie Perryer

Meg Wolitzer must be psychic. Well before the explosive allegations against Harvey Weinstein were revealed and the #MeToo movement gathered pace, she penned The...

Review | Fragmented Dialogues – Art and Identity in 1980s Chile

Fragmented Dialogues: Mario Fonseca & Mauricio Valenzuela, Art & Identity in 1980s Chile is currently on display at the Austin Desmond Fine Art Gallery,...

Review | The Pleasures of Queuing by Erik Martiny

Erik Martiny The Pleasures of Queueing Mastodon Publishing 2018 ISBN 978-1-7320091-1-0 In chapter 13 of his very funny and entirely absorbing novel, Erik Martiny has his narrator and...

Review | Lee Bul: Crashing at the Hayward Gallery

Lee Bul does not make art that is designed to comfort you. Her latest collection at the Hayward Gallery on the South Bank is a...

Review | Fatherland at the Lyric Hammersmith

The coats stand out in the exhilarating performance piece Fatherland now on at the Lyric, Hammersmith after its premiere in the Manchester International Festival...

Review | Sex With Robots and Other Devices

In a world where Siri and Alexa can organise our lives without even touching a button, the question of consenting machines seems almost irrational;...

Review | Multiverse by Andrew Wynn Owen

The Multiverse ( or theermvsuitle as it says on the cover)  is the first poetry collection by Andrew Wynn Owen, a fellow of All...

Review | Red at Wyndham’s Theatre

Walking into the Wyndham, the stage takes you by surprise. Alfred Molina sits unmoving, back to the audience, staring fixedly at one of the...

Review | The Ink Trade by Anthony Burgess, Edited by Will...

  Even though Burgess was an ‘enormously prolific journalist’, he is dominantly known for his controversial, cult classic A Clockwork Orange (1962). But you will...

Review | Absolute Hell – Pissed In Purgatory

Rodney Ackland’s play ‘Absolute Hell’ (at the National Theatre until 16 June) is like spying on a drunken party through a club door. The...

Review | The Inheritance at The Young Vic

The Inheritance stands at almost seven hours long: Matthew Lopez’s two-part, self-aware epic on the legacy of gay men past-and present. Treating everything from...

Review | Three Women at The Trafalgar Studios

Katy Brand’s Three Women at the Trafalgar Studios offers a representation of the title across respective and somewhat stereotypical generations.  Suzanne, a crystal-loving 40-year old played by...

Review | Home by Amanda Berriman

Home is an overwhelming and important, gripping novel about a struggling family seen through the eyes of four-year old daughter, Jesika. Amanda Berriman has successfully taken...

Review | Carcanet New Poetries VII: Book Launch at the London...

The London Review Bookshop, Bloomsbury, 7pm. Wine glasses clatter as they are placed on the floor, animated conversation fills the air, friends are greeted,...

Review | Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy at the Tate Modern

If you’ve ever doubted the sheer scale of Picasso’s productivity, a visit to the Tate Modern’s latest exhibition will convince you of the artist’s...

Review | What Are We Doing Here? by Marilynne Robinson

The joy of an episodic form is it can be appreciated multiple ways. You do not need to agree with every constituent part to...

Review | Known Unknowns at The Saatchi Gallery

In the current exhibit at the Saatchi Gallery, Known Unknowns, you are not meant to know of the artists. If you do, you’re missing...

Review | Black Book by Gideon Rubin at The Freud Museum

The Freud Museum, in Freud’s old house, is a five-minute walk from Finchley Road tube station, away from the main road on a residential...

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