Joel Shapiro at Pace London

Walking into the Joel Shapiro exhibition at the Pace gallery is like entering a painting, as a friend of mine said when she first...

Review | The King and the Catholics: The Fight for Rights...

In an age which has sidelined the Christian faith, the long, bitterly contested campaign to remove the serious discrimination suffered by Roman Catholics in...

Review | Underland by Robert Macfarlane

How should writers respond to the ecological crisis? Both 'crisis' and the much-contested term ‘Anthropocene’ appear to bring us to the brink: there is, they tell us, no return to a state of innocence. If the possibility of an alternative future ever existed (and some claim it never did), then now it must be foregone [...]

Kamal Boullata – And There Was Light

This autumn the Berloni gallery presents the first London exhibition of Palestinian artist Kamal Boullata’s work since 1978.  The acclaimed artist who is known...

No Map Could Show Them by Helen Mort

No Map Could Show Them, Mort’s second collection, explores the narratives of Victorian and modern women –mountaineers, campaigners, runners – and considers, more broadly,...

Review of ‘The Trial’ at The Young Vic

Rory Kinnear embodied the frantic Josef K masterfully. In this adaptation by Nick Gill, Kinnear speaks in fragmented sentences, revealing his troubled subconscious in...

Dark Fairytale – Review of McQueen at the Theatre Royal Haymarket

McQueen Theatre Royal Haymarket Limited run from 19th AugustReviewed by Lauren HepburnIt's been five years since Lee McQueen took his life. The exquisite dress worn by...

Review | Bindlestiff by Wayne Holloway

2036. In a ramshackle, backwater United States, Marine Corps vet Frank Dubois journeys from L.A. to Detroit, seeking redemption for a life lived off...

Review | Patience by Toby Litt

In every first-person narrative readers are ultimately trapped in the mind of the protagonist, doomed only to know what they know. In Patience, author Toby Litt takes this concept further by sharing the story of Elliott, who is himself trapped in his mind, as his disability inhibits most of his physical movement [...]

Review | Richard III: Brother, Protector, King by Chris Skidmore

Dick the Bad: History's Most Famous Murder Suspect Richard III: Brother, Protector, King - by Chris Skidmore Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20‘Edwards Four, Five, Dick the Bad/...

Unity in Variety VI at Gabriel Fine Arts

In the sixth edition of their most recent collaboration with Barikee, Gabriel Fine Arts showcased an expansive array of work, from the interpretive calligraphy...

Review | The Only Story by Julian Barnes

The Only Story by Julian BarnesReaders who were a little disappointed by Barnes’s last political fiction The Noise of Time will be glad to...

Review | The Built Environment by Emily Hasler

Poetry is not a mass market – perhaps thanks to its reputation for being stylistically obscure and frequently focused on nebulous and intangible subjects...

The Blind Roadmaker by Ian Duhig

In his latest eclectic collection of poems, Ian Duhig sings (and dances) for those marginalised in poetry and forgotten by history. The Blind Roadmaker...

America after the Fall at Royal Academy of Arts

Organised by the Art Institute of Chicago, the Musée de l’Orangerie in Paris and the London Royal Academy of Arts, 'America After the Fall:...

Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler

The latest novelistic offering in Hogarth Shakespeare’s project to refashion the bard’s tales into contemporary retellings, Vinegar Girl compellingly revitalises one of Shakespeare’s most...

Feature | 7 Alternative London Novels

London. Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln’s Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets as if...

Dog Run Moon by Callan Wink

Callan Wink’s debut collection of stories stands as a promising start to a fine literary career. Some of the stories included here have deservedly...

Review | DRAG: Self-portraits and Body Politics at the Hayward Gallery

DRAG: Self-portraits and Body Politics 22 August - 14 October 2018 HENI Project Space, Southbank Centre's Hayward Gallery In what may be the first major institutional...

Review | Circa at Old Red Lion Theatre

Circa, written by Tom Ratcliffe and directed by Andy Twyman is meant to be a story about modern gay life. I say meant to,...

Review | Glad I Did It — Christina Reihill at Bermondsey...

Made up of three L-shaped levels, Christina Reihill's Glad I did it is an invitation into the mind and last days of Ruth Ellis,...

Review | Seen by your fingertips: Queen Mob’s Tea House and...

Anyone who thinks fiction and poetry are dying art forms needs to stay at home and get online more. As Russell Bennetts wrote in The Digital Critic ‘the revolution might not be televised, but will almost certainly be seen by your fingertips.’ Bennetts’s two literary websites [...]

Review | Fabulosa! The Story of Britain’s Secret Gay Language by...

Fabulosa! The Story of Britain's Secret Gay Language, Paul Baker, Reaktion Books, 2019, pp. 320, £15.99 (Hardcover)Polari is a language that was used mainly...

Pearls Exhibition, V&A

 I’ve never really given it a thought – how a pearl is made, at least not until I went to the extensive Pearls exhibition...

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