Picasso Sculptures at Musée National Picasso-Paris

Picasso Sculpture opened to great acclaim last September at New York’s Museum of Modern Art before moving to the Musée National Picasso-Paris and is...

William Eggleston: Portraits

William Eggleston wrote far better than most writers write. He wrote without words through his portraits as fleeting and resonant as a Carver story....

Björk Digital at Somerset House

Over her three-decade long career, Icelandic artist Björk has always blurred limits; genre limits between experimental and pop music, verbal limits between language and...

Wife by Tiphanie Yanique

Intimacy and infidelity, warmth and vacuousness, possessed and free. These are all the paradoxes that are found, lost, and found again in Tiphanie Yanique’s...

The Red and Yellow Nothing by Jay Bernard

It is difficult to put a finger on the immediate aftermath of reading The Red and Yellow Nothing: there is puzzlement, rage, and wonder,...

Dead Women Poets Society

‘#JoinTheSeance!’ is Helen Bowell's excited exhortation to a low-lit room of poetry enthusiasts, surrounded by electric candles in the basement of The Poetry Café and awaiting...

Say Something Back by Denise Riley

In their most cliched form, attempts to describe the experience of bereavement tend to settle into a series of unanswerable questions: ‘why?’ being the...

The Sleepwalkers by Will Stone

Europe is a wasteland in Will Stone’s third collection The Sleepwalkers. The poet portrays the continent as ‘What’s left of burned out stars’ in...

Painters’ Paintings: from Freud to Van Dyck

The idea behind ‘Painters' Paintings: from Freud to Van Dyck’ is an exciting one, if a little difficult to communicate in a title. The exhibition...

Yerma at the Young Vic

Australian theatre’s “enfant terrible,” Simon Stone, rewrites and directs Lorca’s Yerma through a glass darkly. Opening night of Yerma at The Young Vic provided some...

The Blind Roadmaker by Ian Duhig

In his latest eclectic collection of poems, Ian Duhig sings (and dances) for those marginalised in poetry and forgotten by history. The Blind Roadmaker...

Two Collections from Copper Canyon Press

When Richard Siken's first collection, Crush, was awarded the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize in 2004, it won Louise Glück's praise for its...

New Voices from the Tower Hamlets Schools

SLAMbassadors Showcase, 14th July 2016 Close your eyes, and try to remember the last time a thirteen-year-old implored you to 'rise up and change the...

Falling Awake by Alice Oswald

'The whole challenge of poetry', Alice Oswald once wrote, 'is to keep language open, so that what we don't yet know can pass through...

Pearl by Simon Armitage

Simon Armitage’s new translation of the fourteenth-century poem Pearl follows his energetic 2008 translation of the same anonymous poet’s Sir Gawain and the Green...

Forward Prizes for Poetry 2016: Felix Dennis Prize for Best First...

This year's contenders for the Felix Dennis Prize represent an exciting new generation of poets emerging beyond the bounds of well-trodden publication routes like...

Faith Healer at Donmar Warehouse

Lyndsey Turner’s revival of Brian Friel’s 1979 play uses the wisdom of age to give this oft dubbed “modern masterpiece” a dark depth, comedy,...

No Map Could Show Them by Helen Mort

No Map Could Show Them, Mort’s second collection, explores the narratives of Victorian and modern women –mountaineers, campaigners, runners – and considers, more broadly,...

Through by David Herd

David Herd begins his new collection Through with the line: ------It is possible to be precise. The wording-- “it is possible”-- is telling. Not promised, not...

Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler

The latest novelistic offering in Hogarth Shakespeare’s project to refashion the bard’s tales into contemporary retellings, Vinegar Girl compellingly revitalises one of Shakespeare’s most...

The Spoils at Trafalgar Studios

Alongside a fruitful film career, it may come as a surprise that Jesse Eisenberg has time to publish a book of short stories, contribute...

George Shaw – My Back to Nature

In the perpetual twilight of the woodland world, trees loom like sinister monoliths out of the gloom. Leaf-mould partially obscures a discarded garment, or...

Five Rivers Met on a Wooded Plain by Barney Norris

What is ‘home’? A person? A place? A feeling of belonging? These are the questions that run through Barney Norris’s debut novel like a finely...

Painting with Light

There is a scene in Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited in which the odious Boy Mulcaster interrogates Charles Ryder, painter and protagonist, as to why...

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