Kamal Boullata – And There Was Light

This autumn the Berloni gallery presents the first London exhibition of Palestinian artist Kamal Boullata’s work since 1978.  The acclaimed artist who is known...

Review | WITCH by Rebecca Tamás

In her latest collection, WITCH, Rebecca Tamás explores the triumphs and oppression, the strengths and weaknesses, the power and the fears that generations of...

Review | Tracey Emin: A Fortnight of Tears at White Cube

A Fortnight of Tears is a major new exhibition of works by acclaimed British artist Tracey Emin. The show features features a large selection...

Macbeth

Scotland herself is the main character in this blood-soaked reimagining of Shakespeare's shortest tragedy. So enamoured is director Justin Kurzel of his Highland landscape...

Forward Prizes for Poetry 2016: Felix Dennis Prize for Best First...

This year's contenders for the Felix Dennis Prize represent an exciting new generation of poets emerging beyond the bounds of well-trodden publication routes like...

The Red Barn at The National Theatre

In a recent interview with The Times, acclaimed theatre director Robin Icke said that he walks out of shows at the interval ‘all the...

Review | Letters To A First Love From The Future by...

Andy Armitage's pamphlet is among a number of new releases from the poetry press Half-Moon Books, which is based in Otley, West Yorkshire, where...

Review | Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life, Death, Rebirth at Royal...

In a contemporary art world dominated by video art (as shown by the 2018 Turner Prize) Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life, Death, Rebirth presents a...

Shakespeare in Love

Shakespeare in Love, Noel Coward Theatre It is so rare to find a play that has perfected the balance between comedy, romance and tragedy – but...

The Human Factor v Matisse by Richard Warburton

The Southbank Centre is currently hosting the emetic Festival of Love under whose banner falls a twenty five year retrospective, The Human Factor. On...

Quotidian Queerness

The great strength of this exhibition is its demonstration of the ubiquitous nature of queer art and culture. Timed to remind us that it...

Review | The Chameleon by Samuel Fisher

The Chameleon is a book narrated by the soul of a book, which can shape shift between any book that it pleases. Stretching across a time frame that goes from the Black Death of the 13th century to the aftermath of the Cold War in the late twentieth century, it is one of the most unusual love stories that you are likely to read.

Chan by Hannah Lowe

Hannah Lowe’s latest collection of poetry Chan (Bloodaxe, 2016) revisits the characters and stories from her first collection, Chick (Bloodaxe, 2013), which won the...

Review | Mothlight by Adam Scovell

Adam Scovell’s debut novel is narrated by Thomas, a young man who hallucinates the memories of his deceased mentor, Phyllis Ewans. Phyllis is a...

Review | The Monstrous Child at The Royal Opera House

The newly refurbished Linbury Theatre in the Royal Opera House is having its first opera performances with the world premiere of The Monstrous Child,...

Review | DRAG: Self-portraits and Body Politics at the Hayward Gallery

DRAG: Self-portraits and Body Politics 22 August - 14 October 2018 HENI Project Space, Southbank Centre's Hayward Gallery In what may be the first major institutional...

The Soane Museum

London is full of nice places spoilt by too many people. Covent Garden, Richmond and Tate Modern would be delightful if you could halve...

William Eggleston: Portraits

William Eggleston wrote far better than most writers write. He wrote without words through his portraits as fleeting and resonant as a Carver story....

Review | The Governesses by Anne Serre, tr. by Mark Hutchinson

In a large country house enclosed by a gold-gated garden, three young governesses are responsible for the education and general well-being of a group...

Review | Normal People by Sally Rooney

Sally Rooney’s long-awaited second novel “Normal People” burst onto the scene last month, and has been making waves in the literary world since its...

Review | Ghislaine Leung at the Chisenhale Gallery

Ghislaine Leung’s Constitution opened at the Chisenhale Gallery on the 25th January 2019. The work explores the notion of withdrawal and dependency, utilising noise-cancelling...

Review | My Enemy’s Cherry Tree by Wang Ting-Kuo

We don’t have to start if you’re not ready.'The epigraph on the first page of Wang Ting-Huo’s award-winning novel invites pause. It may seem...

Matisse in the Studio at Royal Academy of Arts

‘My life is between the walls of my studio’, Matisse once declared. Matisse in the Studio, currently showing at the Royal Academy of Arts,...

Review | The Ink Trade by Anthony Burgess, Edited by Will...

  Even though Burgess was an ‘enormously prolific journalist’, he is dominantly known for his controversial, cult classic A Clockwork Orange (1962). But you will...

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