Physical by Andrew McMillan

Andrew McMillan’s debut collection Physical opens with an epitaph taken from one of the often overlooked novels of Hilda Doolittle, better known as H.D.,...

Review | Grace Under Pressure: David Foster Wallace on Tennis

Many writers have played tennis: Nabokov, Frost, Pound, Hemingway, Theodore Roethke, Randall Jarrell, even Solzhenitsyn in Vermont and Martin Amis today. Like poetry, tennis has strict rules and requires technical skill. It is individual yet social, aesthetically pleasing, intellectual, at times erotic. Despite its formal rituals [...]

Review | Nan Goldin & Jenny Holzer at Tate Modern

In two exhibitions by Jenny Holzer and Nan Goldin currently on display at the Tate Modern we are presented by two collections of socially...

Review | Mothlight by Adam Scovell

Adam Scovell’s debut novel is narrated by Thomas, a young man who hallucinates the memories of his deceased mentor, Phyllis Ewans. Phyllis is a...

Wife by Tiphanie Yanique

Intimacy and infidelity, warmth and vacuousness, possessed and free. These are all the paradoxes that are found, lost, and found again in Tiphanie Yanique’s...

Review | Alvin Ailey Dance Theater Company at Sadler’s Wells

I first saw the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater Company during a visit to New York between Christmas and New Year in the mid-90s. I was entranced by the troupe and have never since missed a chance [...]

Review | Mnemic Symbols by Andrew Hodgson

It’s a familiar, yet uncanny feeling we all know; like waking up in a hotel you’re sure you’ve never stayed in before, and yet,...

Review | Patience by Toby Litt

In every first-person narrative readers are ultimately trapped in the mind of the protagonist, doomed only to know what they know. In Patience, author Toby Litt takes this concept further by sharing the story of Elliott, who is himself trapped in his mind, as his disability inhibits most of his physical movement [...]

Review | WITCH by Rebecca Tamás

Briony Willis WITCH WITCH, by Rebecca Tamás, Penned in the Margins, pp. 119, £9.99. (paperback) In her latest collection, WITCH, Rebecca Tamás explores the triumphs and oppression, the...

40 Sonnets by Don Paterson

  Paterson is at his best when writing about heartbreak. “The Six,” this reviewer’s favourite piece in 40 Sonnets, speaks of a guitar picked up...

Back to Painting – Danny Fox

It’s a strange time in the history of the visual arts avant-garde right now. So strange that the vast majority of those who think...

Woolf Works at the Royal Opera House

On the night of its seventeenth performance, Woolf Works opens with sounds of London; Big Ben, the distant rumbling of cars, all of which...

The Vintage Poetry Showcase: Ocean Vuong and Kayo Chingonyi

Ocean Vuong and Kayo Chingonyi’s recent reading is one of the most spectacular that I have attended. R. A. Villanueva introduced the event by...

Review | Space Shifters at the Hayward Gallery

An unmitigated treat if you love conceptual art installations and sculptures, SPACE SHIFTERS features twenty artists exploring our perception of space and 'optical' minimalism. Spanning...

Review | Not Like Their Mothers: Ambai & Uhart

This autumn, Archipelago Books published two short story collections in translation: A. Ambai’s A Kitchen in the Corner of the House, translated by the late Lakshmi Holmström, and Hebe Uhart’s The Scent of Buenos Aires, translated by Maureen Shaughnessy. Ambai’s and Uhart’s collections reveal each author’s range as a storyteller [...]

Ibsen’s Ghosts

Ghosts, currently playing at Rose Theatre Kingston brings Stephen Unwin’s (who is also the creative director of this play) translation of Henrik Ibsen’s 1800s...

Auerbach’s Intimitable Magic

When Frank Auerbach first came to public notice – emerged rather than burst – in the 1950s he was noted as a “British Expressionist”...

Review | Twenty Theatres to See Before You Die by Amber...

“You can take an empty space and call it a bare stage”, Amber Massie-Blomfield opens her book with this evocative statement and thus begins...

Björk Digital at Somerset House

Over her three-decade long career, Icelandic artist Björk has always blurred limits; genre limits between experimental and pop music, verbal limits between language and...

9 of Europe’s Best Bookshops

A good bookshop can be many different things - a haven from the world, a counter-cultural space, and a meeting point for friends, as...

Princess Ida

Princess Ida, Finborough Theatre, Until 18th April 2015 One’s first experience of seeing a play at Finborough theatre is really rather charming. Located above the Finborough Arms...

Review | Charlotte Prodger and Forensic Architecture — The Turner Prize...

In The War of Desire and Technology at the Close of the Mechanical Age, Allucquére  Roseanne Stone discusses how our consciousness is altered by...

Chan by Hannah Lowe

Hannah Lowe’s latest collection of poetry Chan (Bloodaxe, 2016) revisits the characters and stories from her first collection, Chick (Bloodaxe, 2013), which won the...

Review | Machines Like Me and The Cockroach by Ian McEwan

For fans of Ian McEwan’s writing, 2019 presented two rough-cut diamonds: Machines Like Me and The Cockroach. Not without their flaws, as some critics noted, they are nonetheless highly enjoyable and sure to leave even the ultra-demanding and fastidious reader hankering for more. The novels differ in more ways than one. Firstly, there’s size: Machines Like Me clocks in at a reasonable 306 pages, while The Cockroach, a much slimmer work [...]

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