Review | Salvador Dali At Home

Salvador Dali At Home, Jackie De Burca, Quarto, 2018, pp. 176, Hardcover, £25 Salvador Dali at Home is a book that seeks to unveil the places...

Review | Exposure by Olivia Sudjic

Exposure, Olivia Sudjic, Pensinsula Press, 2018, pp. 127, £6 Exposure, the new book by Olivia Sudjic, elegantly dissects the multi-layered web of anxieties particular to the...

Review | Oceania at the Royal Academy of Arts

Oceania is the first ever major survey of Oceanic art to be held in the UK and is pioneering in its scope and understanding of...

Review | Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War at the British Library

Anglo-Saxon England, which lasted from the 5th to the 11th centuries, a span two-hundred years longer than the Roman occupation, nevertheless occupies a much...

Review | Theatre | The Unreturning at the Everyman Theatre

Frantic Assembly’s latest project “The Unreturning” arrives at Theatre Royal Stratford East in January 2019. This time, their celebrated physicality explores the lives of...

Review | Green Noise by Jean Sprackland

Green Noise, Jean Sprackland, Jonathan Cape, 2018, 64pp, £10.00 With Green Noise, the fifth collection from Jean Sprackland, she attunes us to a planetary resonance. Many of...

Review | A Very Very Very Dark Matter at the Bridge...

Fairy tales are not really for children. Bluebeard beheads his wives; Little Red Riding Hood’s beloved grandma is eaten alive and impersonated by a...

Review | Medusa at Sadler’s Wells Theatre by Briony Willis

Through beautifully poetic movements and engaging drama, Jasmin Vardimon has created a unique choreographic voice that enables her to explore deeply controversial social and...

Review | Christian Marclay — The Clock at Tate Modern

Christian Marclay Blavatnik Building, level 2 Tate Modern Until 20th January 2019 “Time present and time past”, as T.S. Eliot famously claimed in Burnt Norton, are “both perhaps...

Review | Limbo by Dan Fox

Following on from his brilliant attack on intellectual conservatism in 2016's Pretentiousness: Why It Matters, Dan Fox's new long-form essay Limbo finds the frieze editor all...

Review | The Book of Joan by Lidia Yukavitch | H(a)ppy...

H(a)ppy, Nicola Barker, William Heinemann, 2017 The Book of Joan, Lidia Yuknavitch, Canongate, 2018 In Nicola Barker’s H(a)ppy and Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Book of Joan, we have two novels...

Review | Normal People by Sally Rooney

Sally Rooney’s long-awaited second novel “Normal People” burst onto the scene last month, and has been making waves in the literary world since its...

Review | Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead...

'It's Animals taking revenge on people.' Big Foot has died. Our narrator introduces us to an alarming situation in an almost mechanical tone. The newly...

Review | The Chameleon by Samuel Fisher

The Chameleon is a book narrated by the soul of a book, which can shape shift between any book that it pleases. Stretching across a time frame that goes from the Black Death of the 13th century to the aftermath of the Cold War in the late twentieth century, it is one of the most unusual love stories that you are likely to read.

Review | Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde at The...

The centrifugal drive behind much of the work featured in the Barbican’s new exhibition Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde is enunciated by Rodin in the first gallery: ‘I express in a loud voice what all artists think. Desire! Desire! What a formidable stimulant.’

Feature | 7 Alternative London Novels

London. Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln’s Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets as if...

Review | Arkady by Patrick Langley

Patrick Langley’s Arkady is the story of two brothers, Jackson and Frank, who are drifting. They explore the city, a not-quite-London of abandoned offices, growing...

Interview | Roubi L’Roubi | Saatchi Gallery | Forests and Spirits:...

An interview with Roubi L’Roubi, co-curator of Forests and Spirits: Figurative art from the Khartoum School, a new exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery.

Review | Focus Kazakhstan: Postnomadic Mind

Stepping into Wapping Hydraulic Power Station, originally built in 1890 to power the machinery of industrial London, the similarities between the history of the...

Review | This is Memorial Device by David Keenan

Scottish music in 1983 This is Memorial Device, David Keenan, Faber and Faber, February 2017, pp.304, £14.99, (paperback) News of the death, back in June, of Bogdan...

Interview | Cradeaux Alexander

American video and performance artist Cradeaux Alexander presents a mid-career retrospective this month at Bow Arts, London. Jemima Walter met him to uncover how...

Review | Burning Woman by Lucy H. Pearce

Designed to teach, inspire and empower generations of women who suffer from a deep internal burning; Burning Woman is a non-fictional, controversial exploration into...

Review | Letters To A First Love From The Future by...

Andy Armitage's pamphlet is among a number of new releases from the poetry press Half-Moon Books, which is based in Otley, West Yorkshire, where...

Review | Promising Young Women by Caroline O’Donoghue

This year has truly brought to the fiction scene some of the most stunning and powerful female characters. From the extreme – such as My...

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