Review | Xeixa: Fourteen Catalan Poets

Xeixa: Fourteen Catalan Poets Tupelo Press, 2018, edited by Marlon L. Fick and Francisca Esteve The news in recent months has been splashed with images of...

Review | Rough Trade Books | Series 3

The recently-launched Rough Trade Books imprint has been releasing pamphlets at a prolific rate since the summer of last year, bringing us highly collectable...

Review | The Snowman at The Peacock Theatre

This Christmas, join the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in their magical rendition of Raymond Brigg’s The Snowman. Christmas would not be the same without this enchanting...

Review | The Triumph of Cancer by Chris McCabe

The scientific language used by doctors to describe cancer—the uncontrollable growth of a single cell—is often mystifying and alienating. Can the experience of cancer...

Review | Space Shifters at the Hayward Gallery

An unmitigated treat if you love conceptual art installations and sculptures, SPACE SHIFTERS features twenty artists exploring our perception of space and 'optical' minimalism. Spanning...

Review | Hansel and Gretel at the Royal Opera House

The operatic Christmas mainstay Hansel and Gretel, by Humperdinck, makes a long awaited return to the Royal Opera House; it’s first time since January...

Review | Charlotte Prodger and Forensic Architecture — The Turner Prize...

In The War of Desire and Technology at the Close of the Mechanical Age, Allucquére  Roseanne Stone discusses how our consciousness is altered by...

Review | Gustav Klimt and Egon Schiele at the Royal Academy

In chapter 5 of Robert Musil’s The Man Without Qualities the protagonist Ulrich sets about restoring a house he has just bought:

Review | Krzysztof Gil: Welcome to the Country Where the Gypsy...

On view at l’étrangère gallery in East London is the first ever UK solo exhibition by the Polish Roma artist Krzysztof Gil. Entitled Welcome...

Review | Shitstorm by Fernando Sdrigotti

Shitstorm, Fernando Sdrigotti, Open Pen, 2018, £4.99 Among four equally alluring others, Open Pen’s new series of “novelettes” features Fernando Sdrigotti’s latest story Shitstorm, which...

Review | Summer and Smoke at The Duke of York’s Theatre

A poetic vision of human nature and our existential struggle to forge the middle ground between body and soul. After writing his (in)famous A...

Review | Now, Now, Louison by Jean Frémon

Now, Now, Louison, Jean Frémon (translated by Cole Swensen), Les Fugitives, 2018, pp.115, £12.00 Now, Now, Louison, originally published in French as Calme-toi, Louison in 2016, is...

Review | Virginia Woolf: An Exhibition Inspired By Her Writings —...

The first thing that you see as you enter the Virginia Woolf exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum is a photograph of Woolf’s writing desk....

Review | Death and Other Holidays by Marci Vogel

Death and Other Holidays, Marci Vogel, Melville House, November 2018 Award-winning writer, poet and translator Marci Vogel is the author of the poetry collection At...

Review | Glad I Did It — Christina Reihill at Bermondsey...

Made up of three L-shaped levels, Christina Reihill's Glad I did it is an invitation into the mind and last days of Ruth Ellis,...

Review | Salvador Dali At Home

Salvador Dali At Home, Jackie De Burca, Quarto, 2018, pp. 176, Hardcover, £25 Salvador Dali at Home is a book that seeks to unveil the places...

Review | Exposure by Olivia Sudjic

Exposure, Olivia Sudjic, Pensinsula Press, 2018, pp. 127, £6 Exposure, the new book by Olivia Sudjic, elegantly dissects the multi-layered web of anxieties particular to the...

Review | Oceania at the Royal Academy of Arts

Oceania is the first ever major survey of Oceanic art to be held in the UK and is pioneering in its scope and understanding of...

Review | Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War at the British Library

Anglo-Saxon England, which lasted from the 5th to the 11th centuries, a span two-hundred years longer than the Roman occupation, nevertheless occupies a much...

Review | Theatre | The Unreturning at the Everyman Theatre

Frantic Assembly’s latest project “The Unreturning” arrives at Theatre Royal Stratford East in January 2019. This time, their celebrated physicality explores the lives of...

Review | Green Noise by Jean Sprackland

Green Noise, Jean Sprackland, Jonathan Cape, 2018, 64pp, £10.00 With Green Noise, the fifth collection from Jean Sprackland, she attunes us to a planetary resonance. Many of...

Review | A Very Very Very Dark Matter at the Bridge...

Fairy tales are not really for children. Bluebeard beheads his wives; Little Red Riding Hood’s beloved grandma is eaten alive and impersonated by a...

Review | Medusa at Sadler’s Wells Theatre by Briony Willis

Through beautifully poetic movements and engaging drama, Jasmin Vardimon has created a unique choreographic voice that enables her to explore deeply controversial social and...

Review | Christian Marclay — The Clock at Tate Modern

Christian Marclay Blavatnik Building, level 2 Tate Modern Until 20th January 2019 “Time present and time past”, as T.S. Eliot famously claimed in Burnt Norton, are “both perhaps...

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