Review | La Fille du régiment at the Royal Opera House

Donizetti’s familial, romantic French comedy has its fourth revival in Laurent Pelly’s fabulous production at the Royal Opera House. The opera is about Marie, who...

Review | 58th Venice Biennale

Venice, that city of dreams and the inspiration for artists and writers from Turner to Italo Calvino, sees its 58th art biennale. As thousands...

Review | Il Trovatore at Teatro Real

Verdi’s Il Trovatore is notoriously difficult for opera houses to produce. Caruso once said that all you needed for Il Trovatore to work was...

Review | Giovanna D’Arco at Teatro Real

Verdi’s seventh opera, Giovanna D’Arco premiered in 1845 and tells the story of Joan of Arc, an exceptionally popular subject at the time. Madrid’s...

Review | Kiss My Genders & Urban Impulses: Latin American Photography...

Art endows people with the power to take control of their self-expression, to create themselves and identify themselves in a manner unadulterated by social...

Review | Group Hat and How Chicago! Imagists 1960s & 70s...

The waves come and go, breaking on the shore at their own singular pace. Grains of sand become whole under their release, imagination finding...

Review | Jellyfish at the National Theatre

Ben Weatherhill wrote Jellyfish specifically for the actress Sarah Gordy, and after seeing her incredible performance at The National Theatre, you can see why....

Review | Ten Years of Towner Art Gallery

The building itself is an intricate dance of angles, edges and corners; the colours and lines are a call to life, an open invitation...

Review | Nan Goldin & Jenny Holzer at Tate Modern

In two exhibitions by Jenny Holzer and Nan Goldin currently on display at the Tate Modern we are presented by two collections of socially...

Review | Orange World and Other Stories by Karen Russell

Orange World and Other Stories, Karen Russell, Penguin, pp. 288, £14.99 (hardcover) Karen Russell’s third short story collection Orange World is every bit as inventive...

Review | Frank Bowling at Tate Britain

Born in 1934 in what was then British Guiana (now Guyana), Frank Bowling studied at the Royal College of Art alongside David Hockney and...

Review | Fabulosa! The Story of Britain’s Secret Gay Language by...

Fabulosa! The Story of Britain's Secret Gay Language, Paul Baker, Reaktion Books, 2019, pp. 320, £15.99 (Hardcover) Polari is a language that was used mainly...

Review | Edvard Munch: Love and Angst at the British Museum

Known for the haunting anguish of The Scream, Norwegian painter and printmaker Edvard Munch produced less notorious pieces with a similar apocalyptic gloom. The...

Review | Four Quartets at the Barbican

T. S. Eliot was famously wary about artistic interpretations of his poems. In a letter in 1947 to Dale E. Fern, he wrote that...

Review | Max Beaverbrook: Not Quite a Gentleman by Charles Williams

Max Beaverbrook: Not Quite a Gentleman By Charles Williams Biteback Publishing, £25 In the age of the internet it is easy to forget the immense influence that...

Review | Stanley Kubrick at The Design Museum

Bringing iconic films to the main screen, from Clockwork Orange to The Shining, Stanley Kubrick has contributed significantly to 20th century popular culture.  The...

Review | Vivian by Christina Hesselholdt

Vivian, Christina Hesselholdt, Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2019, pp.192, £12.99 (paperback) “What I produce is so good that if I start showing it to professionals, I’ll never...

Review | Tales of Two Londons: Stories From A Fractured City

Tales of Two Londons: Stories From A Fractured City, edited by Claire Armitstead, Arcadia Books, 2019, £9.99 It’s Saturday morning in Hornsey and I make...

Review | Salt Slow by Julia Armfield

Salt Slow, Julia Armfield, Pan Macmillan, 2019, pp.208, £12.99 (hardback) This electric, enthralling collection of short stories from Julia Armfield owns its influences upfront. In...

Review | A Map Towards Fluency & A Few Interiors

A Map Towards Fluency, Lisa Kelly, Carcanet Press, 2019, pp.112, £8.99 A Few Interiors, Rowland Bagnell, Carcanet Press, 2019, pp.64, £8.99 ------Carcanet’s latest publications include the...

Review | Days in the Caucasus by Banine & Crossing by...

Days in the Caucasus, Banine (translated by  Anne Thompson-Ahmadova), Pushkin Press, 2019, pp. 288 (hardback) Crossing, Pajtim Statovci (translated by David Hackston), Pushkin Press, 2019,...

Review | Lee Krasner at the Barbican

Lee Krasner’s work was central in the proliferation of abstract expressionism in the United States. A new show at the Barbican, Lee Krasner: Living...

Review | My Enemy’s Cherry Tree by Wang Ting-Kuo

We don’t have to start if you’re not ready.'The epigraph on the first page of Wang Ting-Huo’s award-winning novel invites pause. It may seem...

Review | Mnemic Symbols by Andrew Hodgson

It’s a familiar, yet uncanny feeling we all know; like waking up in a hotel you’re sure you’ve never stayed in before, and yet,...

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