Review | Ten Years of Towner Art Gallery

The building itself is an intricate dance of angles, edges and corners; the colours and lines are a call to life, an open invitation...

Review | Nan Goldin & Jenny Holzer at Tate Modern

In two exhibitions by Jenny Holzer and Nan Goldin currently on display at the Tate Modern we are presented by two collections of socially...

Review | Orange World and Other Stories by Karen Russell

Orange World and Other Stories, Karen Russell, Penguin, pp. 288, £14.99 (hardcover) Karen Russell’s third short story collection Orange World is every bit as inventive...

Review | Frank Bowling at Tate Britain

Born in 1934 in what was then British Guiana (now Guyana), Frank Bowling studied at the Royal College of Art alongside David Hockney and...

Review | Fabulosa! The Story of Britain’s Secret Gay Language by...

Fabulosa! The Story of Britain's Secret Gay Language, Paul Baker, Reaktion Books, 2019, pp. 320, £15.99 (Hardcover) Polari is a language that was used mainly...

Review | Edvard Munch: Love and Angst at the British Museum

Known for the haunting anguish of The Scream, Norwegian painter and printmaker Edvard Munch produced less notorious pieces with a similar apocalyptic gloom. The...

Review | Four Quartets at the Barbican

T. S. Eliot was famously wary about artistic interpretations of his poems. In a letter in 1947 to Dale E. Fern, he wrote that...

Review | Max Beaverbrook: Not Quite a Gentleman by Charles Williams

Max Beaverbrook: Not Quite a Gentleman By Charles Williams Biteback Publishing, £25 In the age of the internet it is easy to forget the immense influence that...

Review | Stanley Kubrick at The Design Museum

Bringing iconic films to the main screen, from Clockwork Orange to The Shining, Stanley Kubrick has contributed significantly to 20th century popular culture.  The...

Review | Vivian by Christina Hesselholdt

Vivian, Christina Hesselholdt, Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2019, pp.192, £12.99 (paperback) “What I produce is so good that if I start showing it to professionals, I’ll never...

Review | Tales of Two Londons: Stories From A Fractured City

Tales of Two Londons: Stories From A Fractured City, edited by Claire Armitstead, Arcadia Books, 2019, £9.99 It’s Saturday morning in Hornsey and I make...

Review | Salt Slow by Julia Armfield

Salt Slow, Julia Armfield, Pan Macmillan, 2019, pp.208, £12.99 (hardback) This electric, enthralling collection of short stories from Julia Armfield owns its influences upfront. In...

Review | A Map Towards Fluency & A Few Interiors

A Map Towards Fluency, Lisa Kelly, Carcanet Press, 2019, pp.112, £8.99 A Few Interiors, Rowland Bagnell, Carcanet Press, 2019, pp.64, £8.99 ------Carcanet’s latest publications include the...

Review | Days in the Caucasus by Banine & Crossing by...

Days in the Caucasus, Banine (translated by  Anne Thompson-Ahmadova), Pushkin Press, 2019, pp. 288 (hardback) Crossing, Pajtim Statovci (translated by David Hackston), Pushkin Press, 2019,...

Review | Lee Krasner at the Barbican

Lee Krasner’s work was central in the proliferation of abstract expressionism in the United States. A new show at the Barbican, Lee Krasner: Living...

Review | My Enemy’s Cherry Tree by Wang Ting-Kuo

We don’t have to start if you’re not ready.'The epigraph on the first page of Wang Ting-Huo’s award-winning novel invites pause. It may seem...

Review | Mnemic Symbols by Andrew Hodgson

It’s a familiar, yet uncanny feeling we all know; like waking up in a hotel you’re sure you’ve never stayed in before, and yet,...

Review | The Governesses by Anne Serre, tr. by Mark Hutchinson

In a large country house enclosed by a gold-gated garden, three young governesses are responsible for the education and general well-being of a group...
We'll Never Have Paris, ed. Andrew Gallix, Repeater Books, May 2019

Review | We’ll Never Have Paris ed. Andrew Gallix

“The failure of the English revolution… is all around us: in the Westminster constitution, in Ireland, and poisoning English attitudes to Europe”. — London, Patrick...

Review | Twenty Theatres to See Before You Die by Amber...

“You can take an empty space and call it a bare stage”, Amber Massie-Blomfield opens her book with this evocative statement and thus begins...

Review | Billy Budd at Royal Opera House

For the first time in almost twenty years, Benjamin Britten’s Billy Budd returns home to the Royal Opera House in this co-production with Rome...

Review | Henry Moore: Influences and Influenced at Connaught Brown

Henry Moore has had an insurmountable influence on contemporary art. A new exhibition at Mayfair gallery Connaught Brown — Henry Moore: Influences and Influenced...

Review | Fresh Complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides & Days of Awe...

Jeffrey Eugenides’s latest short story collection is packed full of literary treats in case you haven’t read them when they originally appeared in The...

Review | Out of the Woods by Luke Turner

Out of the Woods, the first book by Luke Turner, begins with the breakdown of a five year relationship with his girlfriend, caused by...

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