Auerbach’s Intimitable Magic

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When Frank Auerbach first came to public notice – emerged rather than burst – in the 1950s he was noted as a “British Expressionist”...

Review | Nocilla Lab | Agustín Fernández Mallo

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Nocilla Lab, Agustín Fernández Mallo (Translated by Thomas Bunstead), Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2019, pp. 192, £12.99 "The fascination of humankind with beaches goes to the heart...

Castles in the Air | Stephen Chambers : The Court of...

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Princes, prefects, urchins and poets; these are just a few in a court of luminaries setting sail to Venice. But all is not as...

Poetry | Letter to Bez by Chris McCabe

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Bez, post-Victorian Boz, Viz incarnate / and Viceroy of the sinew, what is the name / for light that detracts from the stars? / Urban pollutants de-lux distant galaxies / as we walk after / parties through school fields, / via car parks, past vacant vats & waste lots [...]

Donald Trump – America’s First Oligarch-in-Chief

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By Mohammad Zahoor On 20th January this year Donald Trump was sworn in as President of the United States. In the eyes of millions both...

Essay | Dostoevsky and Poor Folk by Patrick Maxwell

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Wilfred Owen captured the national spirit best when he talked of the ‘drawing-down of blinds’, surely the most succinct depiction of English melancholia. The English spirit – distinct from of Britishness, though also a part of it – is one of deep decline under the shadow of former empire. It is the spirit of T. S. Eliot’s line ‘winter’s afternoon | In a secluded chapel’ in ‘Little Gidding’; of the quiet introit sung by an evensong choir, backing away into the cathedrals’ dingy corners [...]

Review | Known Unknowns at The Saatchi Gallery

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In the current exhibit at the Saatchi Gallery, Known Unknowns, you are not meant to know of the artists. If you do, you’re missing...

Review | Mothlight by Adam Scovell

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Adam Scovell’s debut novel is narrated by Thomas, a young man who hallucinates the memories of his deceased mentor, Phyllis Ewans. Phyllis is a...

Fiction | Asma by Dur e Aziz Amna

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Dur e Aziz Amna received second prize in our Short Story Competition 2017.  The year Asma moved in with us, we were living in a two-family...

Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler

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The latest novelistic offering in Hogarth Shakespeare’s project to refashion the bard’s tales into contemporary retellings, Vinegar Girl compellingly revitalises one of Shakespeare’s most...

Ophelia Among The Flowers by Redon

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Odilon Redon’s Ophelia Among The Flowers is one of the many pastels that take Shakespeare’s tragedy Hamlet as their subject. But this early twentieth-century piece,...

Coriolanus at the Donmar

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Shakespeare’s Coriolanus, performed at the Donmar Warehouse, Directed by Josie Rourke, Wednesday 18th December 2013   Loyal to Shakespeare’s ‘noisiest play’, the Donmar Warehouse brings us...

Review | Green Noise by Jean Sprackland

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Green Noise, Jean Sprackland, Jonathan Cape, 2018, 64pp, £10.00 With Green Noise, the fifth collection from Jean Sprackland, she attunes us to a planetary resonance. Many of...

Essay | Residents in a World of Ideas: Thoughts on Cafés...

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Before a trip to Vienna a few weeks ago I asked a friend where I should go. ‘It’s all cafés and art. There’s nothing...

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood

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In 2009, Ursula K. Le Guin caused something of a stir in the science-fiction community by contradicting Atwood’s claim that her novels belonged to...

Review | ‘My Generation’ – The 1960s Through the Eyes of...

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My Generation Presented by Michael Caine On cinematic release from 14th March 2018 As the sun rises with a vivid pop art palette over the River Thames,...

Essay | Becket back in the cathedral

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Great drama has a way of always being relevant whenever it is performed, even if, like T. S. Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral, it isn’t performed very often. The play is, of course, about the assassination of Thomas Becket, but with undertones of the shadow of Fascism over Europe. Next year sees the 850th anniversary of the event [...]

No Map Could Show Them by Helen Mort

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No Map Could Show Them, Mort’s second collection, explores the narratives of Victorian and modern women –mountaineers, campaigners, runners – and considers, more broadly,...
Rebecca-the-play

Rebecca the play

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We caught up with Emma Rice, Director of Kneehigh Productions on her latest piece: Rebecca the play. Adapting one of Britain’s most loved novels...

Review | Love, Rage – and Laughter by Alex Diggins

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It is hard to smile at the apocalypse. Extinction Rebellion, the global climate crisis movement occupying cities and social media feeds from Cairo to Melbourne, signs its newsletters: ‘In love and rage’. The climate-induced societal breakdown is, this sign off implies, no laughing matter. Higher ideals and deeper, more searching emotions [...]

Defining the Unfinished – Works from The Courtauld Gallery

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Unfinished…Works from The Courtauld Gallery Summer Showcase Special Display 18th June-20th September 2015 Unfinished masterpieces tend only to come to light upon the artist’s death,...

Hot Milk by Deborah Levy

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What do we think of when we think of myths? For children, myths are something unquestionable and magical. They present a world removed from...

Review | Black Book by Gideon Rubin at The Freud Museum

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The Freud Museum, in Freud’s old house, is a five-minute walk from Finchley Road tube station, away from the main road on a residential...

Painting with Light

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There is a scene in Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited in which the odious Boy Mulcaster interrogates Charles Ryder, painter and protagonist, as to why...

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