Review | Alejandro Zambra | Not to Read

Lending books to friends. Reading photocopies of novels while smoking a cigarette. Finding the previous owner's angry scribbles in a second-hand paperback. What comes...

Interview | Ben Aleshire

Ben Aleshire makes his living as a travelling poet, writing poems on his typewriter for whatever his readers can spare as a donation, a...

Confessions of an English Opium Eater: An Essay by David Punter

Before its controversial and ground-breaking publication as a book in 1822, Thomas De Quincey's autobiographical account of opiate addiction Confessions of an English Opium...

Essay | I Go Away To Talk To Myself by Sinead...

Sinead O'BrienI Go Away To Talk To Myself A trip has the same quality a Friday has. Everything ahead. It’s like having your back against...

Smoothly from Harrow, but a Bit Late by Chris Moss

Chris Moss traces the literary journey of the commuter and celebrates his arrival as a 21st century Everyman“Man is born free, and is everywhere...

Review | This is Memorial Device by David Keenan

Scottish music in 1983 This is Memorial Device, David Keenan, Faber and Faber, February 2017, pp.304, £14.99, (paperback) News of the death, back in June, of Bogdan...

Essay | W. W. Jacobs’ The Monkey’s Paw, Revisited by Vidhi...

A cold, rainy night in February was apt for revisiting W. W. Jacobs’ 1902 short story, ‘The Monkey’s Paw’, first published in the collection The Lady of the Barge. Set in imperial Britain, the story endures as a spine-chilling classic of genre fiction; one which explores the folly of dabbling with the supernatural, darkness in its many forms, and the threat of the outsider.A non-commissioned officer, on leave from India, visits an elderly couple and their son. That evening he reveals [...]

Spotlight V: Journals Edition | LE GUN / Hotel

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Essay | Diary of a Pembridge Poet: June 1976 – March...

On 17th June 1976, Robert Greacen, Northern Irish poet and colleague of Chris Rice at a private language school in Holland Park, hosted the first of his poetry workshops from his flat in Pembridge Crescent, Notting Hill Gate. As the junior member at that first meeting, Chris kept a diary of the group’s comings and goings, and continued to do so for the next six years. The extracts below trace a ten-month period from the first meeting in a small flat in Notting Hill Gate to the group’s first public reading in Sloane Square [...]

Essay | Heaney At Home by Simon Tait

Simon TaitHeaney At Home Seamus Heaney’s brother Hugh sums him up better than anyone. “Seamus’s feet never left the ground”, he says, “and you could...

Essay | Fighting Against Productivity by Anna Aguilar

I recently spent a week in an unremarkable town in South West England. Throughout the day, which I spent alone, I found myself feeling trapped and anxious.

Essay | The Bazooka Girl — A Note On Anna Kavan...

If it is possible to concentrate the nature of a person's life into a brief sketch, then that of Anna Kavan is conveyed perfectly in her story Julia and the Bazooka, which seems to me a most symmetrical example of the art by which this obdurately subjective writer chose elements of her life and transformed them into something rich and strange and basically true. Written a year or so before her death in 1968, in a sense she even foresaw her end in this story [...]

Essay | Meg Wolitzer’s #MeToo Moment by Sophie Perryer

Meg Wolitzer must be psychic. Well before the explosive allegations against Harvey Weinstein were revealed and the #MeToo movement gathered pace, she penned The...

News | Caoilinn Hughes, on winning the Collyer Bristow Prize 2019

Caoilinn HughesOn winning the Collyer Bristow PrizeFirst thanks go to my peers—Sophie Mackintosh, Danny Denton, Samuel Fisher and Katherine Kilalea—for writing such good books...

Essay| Shetland Norn by Simon Tait

Shetland is a quiet, self-possessed nation of 22,000 whose population still considers itself to be more Norse than British. They like celebrations, foys they...

Essay | Living in London: Highgate by Jonathan Raban

Jonathan Raban is an award-winning writer, author of among many others, 1974's Soft City, an early classic of psychogeographical urban writing. In February 1970...

Essay | Am fit. Always thinking of you. Love. by Sam...

Before he settled on The Plague for his title, Camus considered The Separated and The Exiles. Exile comes suddenly to the inhabitants of Oran, a ‘clean-cut deprivation’ of contact with their lives beyond the city. The roads are sealed overnight. Not even letters can escape for fear of infection. Phone calls are restricted to ‘urgent cases.’ Lovers parted by quarantine must ‘hunt for tokens of their past communion within the compass of a ten-word telegram’ [...]
The Nowhere Man cover

Essay | Introduction to Kamala Markandaya’s The Nowhere Man

The following essay is the introduction to the latest edition of The Nowhere Man, a novel by Kamala Markandaya, first published in 1972, now...

Internet Poetry by Paul Gittins

In the seventh of his twelve lectures as Oxford Professor of Poetry, the late Geoffrey Hill took issue with the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann...

Essay | Reflections on Orwell’s Coming Up for Air by Patrick...

"Call it peace, if you like. But when I say peace I don’t mean absence of war, I mean peace, a feeling in your guts. And it’s gone for ever if the rubber-truncheon boys get hold of us." What moves us about this passage? It is not particularly difficult to know which literary world we are in, which part of history we are being exposed to, and even which author is speaking [...]

Essay | A Dream of Maps: Notes from a Book Launch...

Chris Rice first met Matthew Sweeney at a poetry workshop in London in 1976, and they remained friends for forty-two years until Matthew's death in 2018. Chris Rice's elegy to Matthew and their long friendship [...]

Archive | Why I Write — Joan Didion

First published in the June/July 1977 of The London Magazine (Vol. 17, No. 2)  Of course I stole the title from George Orwell. One reason...

Easter Island by Fiona Brenninkmaker

Charting the evolution of Easter Island wooden carvings from spiritual receptacle to auction treasure.Allow me to take you on a small journey to Easter...

Donald Trump – America’s First Oligarch-in-Chief

By Mohammad ZahoorOn 20th January this year Donald Trump was sworn in as President of the United States. In the eyes of millions both...

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