Kiss-Kiss-Kissuni by Frances Park

Memories. Some lie dormant for decades then suddenly spring awake, fresh as yesterday. I like to think the writer in me brought Kissuni back...

Essay | Books That Changed My Life: ‘Tales from Ovid’

‘I don’t get poetry.’ It’s a miserable cliché, but generation after generation takes it to heart. In fact, as a teenager studying for my GCSEs, I believed it myself. Still sporting K-Swiss trainers and a swooping Justin Bieber fringe long after it was a good look (if it ever was), I was stuck in my old ways. I was a novels person, I thought — poems were too brief to affect me deeply or really sear themselves onto my psyche [...]

My London by Tristram Fane Saunders

Home is a box on Coppermill Lane, caught in the crosshairs of Walthamstow High Street and Blackhorse Road. It’s a one-bed flat on two floors,...

Essay | Rediscovering Violette Leduc by Isabelle Marie Flynn

Most bibliophiles will name Simone de Beauvoir, George Sand and Colette among the greats of French literature. Yet they represent the tip of a subversive, transgressive and deeply political iceberg of women writers who have changed the literary and social landscape. As women’s voices grow louder and more diverse in modern publishing, it is vital to recognise that their writing is not new, nor has it just now become important. The words of women are sadly more [...]

Essay | Memories of the 60s by Leonard Quart

Leonard Quart Memories of the 60s I have been trying hard to emotionally survive the Trump era, while living with feelings of revulsion and hopelessness about...

Internet Poetry by Paul Gittins

In the seventh of his twelve lectures as Oxford Professor of Poetry, the late Geoffrey Hill took issue with the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann...

Writing Courses, London Style by Mark Isherwood

London has a disproportionate number of writers compared to the rest of the nation. Or so we are told. Why is this? Is it...

Archive | Coming to London IX by Christopher Isherwood

The following piece was first published in The London Magazine August 1956 Volume 3 No. 8 as "Coming to London — IX", part of...

Essay | Fighting Against Productivity by Anna Aguilar

I recently spent a week in an unremarkable town in South West England. Throughout the day, which I spent alone, I found myself feeling trapped and anxious.

Essay | Travel Writers as Citizens of Nowhere by Cecily Blench

At the Conservative Party Conference in 2016, shortly after the Brexit vote, the new Prime Minister Theresa May gave a speech in which she said these words: ‘If you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere’. She made this point while trying to address the concerns of those who voted for Brexit because of immigration [...]
The Warlock of Love

Essay | The Warlock of Love: Revisiting Marc Bolan’s Forgotten Poetry...

Fifty years ago in March 1969, a rather odd book of verse hit Britain’s bookshelves. Its jacket contained no description of what lay inside...

Kenneth Womack | The Making of Penny Lane

The following is an extract from Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin (The Later Years: 1966-2016) by Kenneth Womack, published by...
We'll Never Have Paris, ed. Andrew Gallix, Repeater Books, May 2019

Extract | Flogging a Dead Clothes Horse by Thom Cuell

The following is an extract from We’ll Never Have Paris edited by Andrew Gallix (3:AM Magazine) — a new collection of fiction and essays...

Essay | Meg Wolitzer’s #MeToo Moment by Sophie Perryer

Meg Wolitzer must be psychic. Well before the explosive allegations against Harvey Weinstein were revealed and the #MeToo movement gathered pace, she penned The...

Review | Alejandro Zambra | Not to Read

Lending books to friends. Reading photocopies of novels while smoking a cigarette. Finding the previous owner's angry scribbles in a second-hand paperback. What comes...

Essay | Brighton Offshore by Shaun Traynor

Nine miles out from land but clearly visible, Brighton now has its own extensive windfarm. No matter where you live or work, in a strange way, it is always in front of you. Working at full capacity it can serve up enough electricity to light 350,000 homes and has become an established feature of the landscape. [...]

Essay | Shakespeare’s London and the Emergence of the Playhouse

Today, the idea of the theatre can evoke tradition and history, having perhaps one of the longest histories of all the arts. But when...

Essay | An argument for theatres by Amber Massie-Blomfield

The last show I saw before lockdown was Love Love Love at the Lyric Hammersmith. 500 of us were in that room; all gathered together to do what, in my pre-quarantine life, I used to do two or three times a week. I didn’t hug my friend when I met him at the start of the evening. It was the beginning of March and what constituted acceptable public behaviour seemed to shift on an hourly basis. We touched elbows. ‘This is probably the last theatre show we’ll ever see,’ [...]

Spotlight IV: Penned in the Margins

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Essay | Tomorrow is Too Late by Nasratullah Elham [Extract]

The following extract is an essay from the collection Tomorrow is Too Late ed. by Grace Maddrell. Grace has collected testimonies of activism and hope...

Ritual Landscapes by Francis Pryor

Many academic phrases, like much academic writing, are too awkward, verbose and cumbersome to find their way into common usage. Indeed, the jargon of...

Essay | The Year Without Atmosphere

It is two months into your new job when someone mentions, in passing, that your microphone fails to capture the first few words of every sentence you utter, so no one has heard almost anything you’ve said. Until that moment, you believed that you were uninsightful and off-topic and you actually cried, getting off one call, at the feeling that you were a kind of business ghost, haunting meetings without ever provoking a response. You felt that your disappearance might [...]

Essay| Shetland Norn by Simon Tait

Shetland is a quiet, self-possessed nation of 22,000 whose population still considers itself to be more Norse than British. They like celebrations, foys they...

Dido and Aeneas by Jeffrey Meyers

Autumn in Venice: Ernest Hemingway and His Last Muse, Andrea di Robilant, Atlantic Books, 348 pp. £17.99 (hardback). Andrea di Robilant has done extensive research, but...

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