Archive | Pier Paolo Pasolini — Divina Mimesis: Canto VII

Pier Paolo Pasolini was an Italian poet, novelist and film-maker, who died in mysterious circumstances in 1975 in an as-yet-unsolved murder case. Hailed by...

What Eliot Means to Me

To mark the fiftieth anniversary of T. S. Eliot's death, the great and the good of the literary world have rolled out tributes, readings,...

Essay | The King of Hay-on-Wye

A maverick anarchist, bookseller and entrepreneur, Richard Booth, who has died aged 80, transformed the small Powys town of Hay-on-Wye into a mecca for the second-hand book. His significant and colourful legacy in the book trade inspired a formula [...]

Five years on – why Natasha Walter’s ‘Living Dolls: The Return...

So there’s a glamour model contest. All women can enter. To decide on a winner, the women must strip, pose sexually and suggestively on...

Essay | Memories of the 60s by Leonard Quart

Leonard Quart Memories of the 60s I have been trying hard to emotionally survive the Trump era, while living with feelings of revulsion and hopelessness about...

Essay | Tony Harrison: Poetry & Class

Patrick Maxwell Tony Harrison: Poetry & Class The use of poetry as a form of class war has arguably never had particularly significant results in much of...

Essay | Residents in a World of Ideas: Thoughts on Cafés...

Before a trip to Vienna a few weeks ago I asked a friend where I should go. ‘It’s all cafés and art. There’s nothing...

Internet Poetry by Paul Gittins

In the seventh of his twelve lectures as Oxford Professor of Poetry, the late Geoffrey Hill took issue with the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann...

Essay | Low Fidelity: The Case for Shakespeare’s Reinvention by Katrina...

Katrina Bennett Low Fidelity: The Case for Shakespeare's Reinvention Perhaps more so than any other Elizabethan writer, William Shakespeare was well aware of the necessity to...

Extract | Rosalind by Arifa Akbar

"Rosalind" by Arifa Akbar, extract taken from Tales of Two Londons: Stories from a Fractured City, ed. Claire Armitstead, Arcadia Books, London, 2019. Copyright...

Essay | Fighting Against Productivity by Anna Aguilar

I recently spent a week in an unremarkable town in South West England. Throughout the day, which I spent alone, I found myself feeling trapped and anxious.

Essay | Meg Wolitzer’s #MeToo Moment by Sophie Perryer

Meg Wolitzer must be psychic. Well before the explosive allegations against Harvey Weinstein were revealed and the #MeToo movement gathered pace, she penned The...

Essay | Living in London: Highgate by Jonathan Raban

Jonathan Raban is an award-winning writer, author of among many others, 1974's Soft City, an early classic of psychogeographical urban writing. In February 1970...

Essay | The Commune of the City by Ian Stone

On 28 October 1272 King Henry III (1216-72) lay dying at Westminster Palace. His eldest son, Edward, returning from crusade, was about to land...

Poetry and the Public by Paul Gittins

The prestigious T.S. Eliot Award in January that kicked off the poetry establishment’s crowded calendar of poetry competitions served to highlight the ever widening...
Peas

Essay | Peas by Alice Dunn

One of the stand-out gardens at this year’s RHS Chelsea Flower Show appeared to replicate the pea in its structure. ‘The Seedlip Garden’ had...

Interview | Kevin Breathnach

I had intended my interview with Kevin Breathnach to go smoothly and at first it appeared to be doing so. We had arranged a...

Essay | Becket back in the cathedral

Great drama has a way of always being relevant whenever it is performed, even if, like T. S. Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral, it isn’t performed very often. The play is, of course, about the assassination of Thomas Becket [...]

Spotlight III: Influx Press

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

‘I the sculptor am the landscape’ – Barbara Hepworth’s Roots of...

This year London houses a major retrospective of the work of Barbara Hepworth alongside her friend and contemporary Henry Moore at Tate Britain. The...

Essay | Travel Writers as Citizens of Nowhere by Cecily Blench

At the Conservative Party Conference in 2016, shortly after the Brexit vote, the new Prime Minister Theresa May gave a speech in which she said these words: ‘If you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere’. She made this point while trying to address the concerns of those who voted for Brexit because of immigration [...]

Battle of Ideas by Francesca Baker

At this year's Battle of Ideas the opening debate concerning literature was entitled To Read or Not To Read - The Canon and the...

Essay | I Go Away To Talk To Myself by Sinead...

Sinead O'Brien I Go Away To Talk To Myself A trip has the same quality a Friday has. Everything ahead. It’s like having your back against...

The Easter Rising by Frank Armstrong

The one hundredth anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising will hardly register in most London Magazine readers’ minds, but for Irish people the anniversary...

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