Archive | Coming to London IX by Christopher Isherwood

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The following piece was first published in The London Magazine August 1956 Volume 3 No. 8 as "Coming to London — IX", part of...

Essay | W. W. Jacobs’ The Monkey’s Paw, Revisited by Vidhi...

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A cold, rainy night in February was apt for revisiting W. W. Jacobs’ 1902 short story, ‘The Monkey’s Paw’, first published in the collection The Lady of the Barge. Set in imperial Britain, the story endures as a spine-chilling classic of genre fiction; one which explores the folly of dabbling with the supernatural, darkness in its many forms, and the threat of the outsider.A non-commissioned officer, on leave from India, visits an elderly couple and their son. That evening he reveals [...]

Poetry and the Public by Paul Gittins

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The prestigious T.S. Eliot Award in January that kicked off the poetry establishment’s crowded calendar of poetry competitions served to highlight the ever widening...

Writing Courses, London Style by Mark Isherwood

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London has a disproportionate number of writers compared to the rest of the nation. Or so we are told. Why is this? Is it...

Essay | I’ll Always Have London by Leonard Quart

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I’m off to London for the first time in a couple of years. There are friends to visit, art exhibitions and plays to see,...

The Sun Shines on Opera by Tom Sutcliffe

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I will always remember my first visit to Glyndebourne. It was a Sunday and I was the countertenor in Westminster Cathedral choir, so I...

Essay | On Writing Ethnic Stories by Haleh Agar

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I was told to use my maiden name – Hassan-Yari, a name that usually meant extra questions at the customs queue but now would...

Essay | Gentrifying New York by Leonard Quart

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Leonard Quart Gentrifying New York The New York one walks through these days is unrecognizable from the city that existed a decade ago. New developments are...

Archive | Apollinaire 1880-1918 by Simon Watson Taylor

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The following essay was first published in The London Magazine, November 1968, Volume 8, No. 8, with accompanying illustrations, and edited by Alan Ross...

Essay | I Go Away To Talk To Myself by Sinead...

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Sinead O'Brien I Go Away To Talk To Myself A trip has the same quality a Friday has. Everything ahead. It’s like having your back against...

Essay | Kafka & Camus by Jeffrey Meyers

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It is odd that the two book-length studies of Albert Camus’ The Stranger (1942), by English Showalter and Alice Kaplan, do not discuss the profound influence of Franz Kafka’s The Trial (1925). Other critics have emphasized, denied or deplored this influence. Herbert Lottman notes that while writing his novel Camus 'had read and reread Kafka, whose work seemed to him prophetic, one of the most significant of our time.' The critic Jean Paulhan - thinking of Hemingway’s simple sentences [...]

Essay | The Commune of the City by Ian Stone

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On 28 October 1272 King Henry III (1216-72) lay dying at Westminster Palace. His eldest son, Edward, returning from crusade, was about to land...

Feature | 7 Alternative London Novels

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London. Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln’s Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets as if...

Essay | Becket back in the cathedral

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Great drama has a way of always being relevant whenever it is performed, even if, like T. S. Eliot’s Murder in the Cathedral, it isn’t performed very often. The play is, of course, about the assassination of Thomas Becket, but with undertones of the shadow of Fascism over Europe. Next year sees the 850th anniversary of the event [...]

Review | Fur Coats in Tahiti by Jeremy Over

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“The best way to live in the present is less carefully”: for better or worse, Jeremy Over’s winningly preposterous fourth collection, Fur Coats in Tahiti, follows its own advice to the letter. On the whole, I think, the better wins out, but let’s start by getting some of the worse [...]

Archive | Notes on Raymond Chandler by Ian Fleming

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With the protagonists of their respective novels being so similar, it is perhaps little surprise that the writers Ian Fleming and Raymond Chandler struck...

Archive | Coming to London II by Leonard Woolf

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The following piece was first published in The London Magazine October 1955 Volume 2 No. 10 as “Coming to London — II”, part of...

Essay | Personal Feeling is the Main Thing by Sue Hubbard

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By Sue Hubbard I have long been interested in the work of Chantal Joffe and have written about her on several occasions. Her figurative paintings...

The Easter Rising by Frank Armstrong

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The one hundredth anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising will hardly register in most London Magazine readers’ minds, but for Irish people the anniversary...

Kiss-Kiss-Kissuni by Frances Park

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Memories. Some lie dormant for decades then suddenly spring awake, fresh as yesterday. I like to think the writer in me brought Kissuni back...

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

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The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Review | This is Memorial Device by David Keenan

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Scottish music in 1983 This is Memorial Device, David Keenan, Faber and Faber, February 2017, pp.304, £14.99, (paperback) News of the death, back in June, of Bogdan...

Ritual Landscapes by Francis Pryor

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Many academic phrases, like much academic writing, are too awkward, verbose and cumbersome to find their way into common usage. Indeed, the jargon of...

Essay | Brighton Offshore by Shaun Traynor

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Nine miles out from land but clearly visible, Brighton now has its own extensive windfarm. No matter where you live or work, in a strange way, it is always in front of you. Working at full capacity it can serve up enough electricity to light 350,000 homes and has become an established feature of the landscape. [...]

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