Review | Exposure by Olivia Sudjic

Exposure, Olivia Sudjic, Pensinsula Press, 2018, pp. 127, £6 Exposure, the new book by Olivia Sudjic, elegantly dissects the multi-layered web of anxieties particular to...

Castles in the Air | Stephen Chambers : The Court of...

Princes, prefects, urchins and poets; these are just a few in a court of luminaries setting sail to Venice. But all is not as...

News | Caoilinn Hughes, on winning the Collyer Bristow Prize 2019

Caoilinn Hughes On winning the Collyer Bristow Prize First thanks go to my peers—Sophie Mackintosh, Danny Denton, Samuel Fisher and Katherine Kilalea—for writing such good books...

Essay | On Writing Ethnic Stories by Haleh Agar

I was told to use my maiden name – Hassan-Yari, a name that usually meant extra questions at the customs queue but now would...

Essay | Fighting Against Productivity by Anna Aguilar

I recently spent a week in an unremarkable town in South West England. Throughout the day, which I spent alone, I found myself feeling trapped and anxious.

Confessions of an English Opium Eater: An Essay by David Punter

Before its controversial and ground-breaking publication as a book in 1822, Thomas De Quincey's autobiographical account of opiate addiction Confessions of an English Opium...

Archive | Notes on Raymond Chandler by Ian Fleming

With the protagonists of their respective novels being so similar, it is perhaps little surprise that the writers Ian Fleming and Raymond Chandler struck...

Essay| Shetland Norn by Simon Tait

Shetland is a quiet, self-possessed nation of 22,000 whose population still considers itself to be more Norse than British. They like celebrations, foys they...

Donald Trump – America’s First Oligarch-in-Chief

By Mohammad Zahoor On 20th January this year Donald Trump was sworn in as President of the United States. In the eyes of millions both...

Essay | On the Benefits of Dancing Naked in Public

In the pub, Jemima raises both her arms above her, then swings one back, turning her head to follow the arc it makes in the air. “Something like that,” she says, sitting back down and taking a chip from the plate between us. We are attempting a reconstruction. What we are attempting to reconstruct is a theatre show called Trilogy, made by an artist called [...]

Internet Poetry by Paul Gittins

In the seventh of his twelve lectures as Oxford Professor of Poetry, the late Geoffrey Hill took issue with the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann...

Essay | Marion Coutts: ‘Aiming or Hitting’ by Annie Carpenter

These are busy times for the writer and artist Marion Coutts. Her first novel, The Iceberg, which was published in 2014, has proved a...

Essay Competition 2018 — Winners Announced!

First of all, a huge, huge thank you to everybody who shared and entered this year's essay prize! Though it was only the second...

Archive | Why I Write — Joan Didion

First published in the June/July 1977 of The London Magazine (Vol. 17, No. 2)  Of course I stole the title from George Orwell. One reason...

Poems on the Underground

If for some reason you ever find yourself playing 'Tube Bingo' there a few things that you are guaranteed to be able to cross...

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Essay | Living in London: Highgate by Jonathan Raban

Jonathan Raban is an award-winning writer, author of among many others, 1974's Soft City, an early classic of psychogeographical urban writing. In February 1970...

Essay | The Bazooka Girl — A Note On Anna Kavan...

If it is possible to concentrate the nature of a person's life into a brief sketch, then that of Anna Kavan is conveyed perfectly in her story Julia and the Bazooka, which seems to me a most symmetrical example of the art by which this obdurately subjective writer chose elements of her life and transformed them into something rich and strange and basically true. Written a year or so before her death in 1968, in a sense she even foresaw her end in this story [...]

Five years on – why Natasha Walter’s ‘Living Dolls: The Return...

So there’s a glamour model contest. All women can enter. To decide on a winner, the women must strip, pose sexually and suggestively on...
The Nowhere Man cover

Essay | Introduction to Kamala Markandaya’s The Nowhere Man

The following essay is the introduction to the latest edition of The Nowhere Man, a novel by Kamala Markandaya, first published in 1972, now...

Writing Courses, London Style by Mark Isherwood

London has a disproportionate number of writers compared to the rest of the nation. Or so we are told. Why is this? Is it...

Poetry and the Public by Paul Gittins

The prestigious T.S. Eliot Award in January that kicked off the poetry establishment’s crowded calendar of poetry competitions served to highlight the ever widening...

My London | Tyne O’Connell

O’Connell lives and works in Mayfair, which serves as a backdrop for much of her contemporary women’s fiction, including ‘Making The A-List’. This is...

Essay | Shakespeare’s London and the Emergence of the Playhouse

Today, the idea of the theatre can evoke tradition and history, having perhaps one of the longest histories of all the arts. But when...

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