The Catch by Fiona Sampson

The cover image of Fiona Sampson’s seventh collection is bright and strange. Taken from photographer Charles Frèger’s Wilder Mann series (2010-11), it depicts a...

The Power by Naomi Alderman

Some suggest that science fiction is a woman’s genre. In its purest form, sci-fi reimagines the structures of society and, in the process, creates...

The Blind Roadmaker by Ian Duhig

In his latest eclectic collection of poems, Ian Duhig sings (and dances) for those marginalised in poetry and forgotten by history. The Blind Roadmaker...

Princess Ida

Princess Ida, Finborough Theatre, Until 18th April 2015 One’s first experience of seeing a play at Finborough theatre is really rather charming. Located above the Finborough Arms...

Essay | Re-reading Frankenstein by Alice Dunn

It is tempting to read Frankenstein as a means of understanding Mary Shelley. 200 years after the novel was first published, Alice Dunn asks,...

Review | Letters To A First Love From The Future by...

Andy Armitage's pamphlet is among a number of new releases from the poetry press Half-Moon Books, which is based in Otley, West Yorkshire, where...
Image from film set of Il Divo

The Problem with Paolo Sorrentino by George Hull

The work of Neapolitan director Paolo Sorrentino combines a compelling visual style with a unique sensitivity for psychological subtleties. The five feature-length films he...

Fiction | Asma by Dur e Aziz Amna

Dur e Aziz Amna received second prize in our Short Story Competition 2017.  The year Asma moved in with us, we were living in a two-family...

Portraits of Artists and Friends – John Singer Sargent

John Singer Sargent – Portraits of Artists and Friends, National Portrait Gallery 12 February – 25 May 2015 If you did not know this was...

Review | A Very Very Very Dark Matter at the Bridge...

Fairy tales are not really for children. Bluebeard beheads his wives; Little Red Riding Hood’s beloved grandma is eaten alive and impersonated by a...

No’s Knife at The Old Vic

‘… no need of a story, a story is not compulsory, just a life, that’s the mistake I made, one of the mistakes, to...

Essay | Fighting Against Productivity by Anna Aguilar

I recently spent a week in an unremarkable town in South West England. Throughout the day, which I spent alone, I found myself feeling trapped and anxious.

Review | What Are We Doing Here? by Marilynne Robinson

The joy of an episodic form is it can be appreciated multiple ways. You do not need to agree with every constituent part to...

Review | The Flesh To The Frame at Opera Gallery London

  David Kim Whittaker’s current exhibition THE FLESH TO THE FRAME reveals a powerful vortex of chaos and harmony. Presented in two parts In the...

Review | The Chameleon by Samuel Fisher

The Chameleon is a book narrated by the soul of a book, which can shape shift between any book that it pleases. Stretching across a time frame that goes from the Black Death of the 13th century to the aftermath of the Cold War in the late twentieth century, it is one of the most unusual love stories that you are likely to read.

Poetry and the Public by Paul Gittins

The prestigious T.S. Eliot Award in January that kicked off the poetry establishment’s crowded calendar of poetry competitions served to highlight the ever widening...

The Bonniest Companie by Kathleen Jamie

Walking and climbing in a landscape of clifftops, glens, summits and strands, the speaker in Kathleen Jamie’s subtle and assured seventh collection journeys through...

Fiction | Quiet Mountain by Sally Jubb

They got on at Vico Equense. The carriage was almost full, but the two of them managed to squeeze into a seat diagonally opposite,...

Review | The Essence of Things at 48 Albemarle Street

Arriving at 48 Albemarle Street you immediately enter a stripped-back environment; surrounded by exposed brick, wood and metal. This industrial interior makes a refreshing...

In Other Words by Jhumpa Lahiri

Jhumpa Lahiri’s life has been marked by a sense of ‘suspension’. Born to Bengali immigrants but brought up in America, she feels ‘without a...

Review | A Walk Through Essex Road IV at Tintype

  When walking the streets of London, its minor and major roads, its arteries and veins, begin to enmesh themselves with the walker’s brain. Over...

Essay | Shakespeare’s London and the Emergence of the Playhouse

Today, the idea of the theatre can evoke tradition and history, having perhaps one of the longest histories of all the arts. But when...

Vanessa Bell at the Dulwich Picture Gallery

How much context do we need to appreciate a painting? Take, for example, Vanessa Bell’s Studland Beach, 1912. We might describe it in terms...

Review | Salvador Dali At Home

Salvador Dali At Home, Jackie De Burca, Quarto, 2018, pp. 176, Hardcover, £25 Salvador Dali at Home is a book that seeks to unveil the places...

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