Review | Salvador Dali At Home

Salvador Dali At Home, Jackie De Burca, Quarto, 2018, pp. 176, Hardcover, £25 Salvador Dali at Home is a book that seeks to unveil the places...

Review | Exposure by Olivia Sudjic

Exposure, Olivia Sudjic, Pensinsula Press, 2018, pp. 127, £6 Exposure, the new book by Olivia Sudjic, elegantly dissects the multi-layered web of anxieties particular to the...

Interview | 2018 Short Story Prize Judges!

With only a few weeks remaining for our Short Story Prize for this year, we thought we would catch up with our judges to...

The London Magazine Podcast | Episode 4 | A Discovery of...

We were recently contacted by Reverend Christian Mitchell of the church of Heathfield in rural Sussex, who had made a remarkable discovery. In one...

Review | Oceania at the Royal Academy of Arts

Oceania is the first ever major survey of Oceanic art to be held in the UK and is pioneering in its scope and understanding of...

Review | Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms: Art, Word, War at the British Library

Anglo-Saxon England, which lasted from the 5th to the 11th centuries, a span two-hundred years longer than the Roman occupation, nevertheless occupies a much...

Archive | Philip Larkin | Two Poems: To The Sea, Annus...

Two Poems, Philip Larkin London Magazine / January 1970 / Vol.9 No.10     Philip Larkin, (1922-1985) a prolific poet and writer of essays,...

Review | Theatre | The Unreturning at the Everyman Theatre

Frantic Assembly’s latest project “The Unreturning” arrives at Theatre Royal Stratford East in January 2019. This time, their celebrated physicality explores the lives of...

Review | Green Noise by Jean Sprackland

Green Noise, Jean Sprackland, Jonathan Cape, 2018, 64pp, £10.00 With Green Noise, the fifth collection from Jean Sprackland, she attunes us to a planetary resonance. Many of...

Essay | Shakespeare’s London and the Emergence of the Playhouse

Today, the idea of the theatre can evoke tradition and history, having perhaps one of the longest histories of all the arts. But when...

Staff Picks | The Best of Gothic Fiction

As it's Halloween today, The London Magazine office have been discussing the nature of horror in fiction, and why we as readers are so...

Archive | Essay | Some Recollections of Brâncuși by Eugène Ionesco

The following essay, originally published in the April 1961 edition of The London Magazine, recounts the time by spent by Eugene Ionesco, one of...

Preview | The Turning of The Leaves at Union Chapel

Following last year's immersive multi-screen audio-visual installation for Remembrance Day, artist and poet Jack Miguel, filmmaker Taz Tron Delix and electronic musician Josh Grey-Jung...

Review | A Very Very Very Dark Matter at the Bridge...

Fairy tales are not really for children. Bluebeard beheads his wives; Little Red Riding Hood’s beloved grandma is eaten alive and impersonated by a...

Poetry | Woman by Manash Bhattacharjee

Woman “It’s easy, impossible, hard, worth trying.” ~ Wislawa Szymborska, “Portrait of a Woman” (1976) She is intimately attached To night and day. Only...

Review | Medusa at Sadler’s Wells Theatre by Briony Willis

Through beautifully poetic movements and engaging drama, Jasmin Vardimon has created a unique choreographic voice that enables her to explore deeply controversial social and...

Review | Christian Marclay — The Clock at Tate Modern

Christian Marclay Blavatnik Building, level 2 Tate Modern Until 20th January 2019 “Time present and time past”, as T.S. Eliot famously claimed in Burnt Norton, are “both perhaps...

Review | Limbo by Dan Fox

Following on from his brilliant attack on intellectual conservatism in 2016's Pretentiousness: Why It Matters, Dan Fox's new long-form essay Limbo finds the frieze editor all...

Review | The Book of Joan by Lidia Yukavitch | H(a)ppy...

H(a)ppy, Nicola Barker, William Heinemann, 2017 The Book of Joan, Lidia Yuknavitch, Canongate, 2018 In Nicola Barker’s H(a)ppy and Lidia Yuknavitch’s The Book of Joan, we have two novels...

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Review | Normal People by Sally Rooney

Sally Rooney’s long-awaited second novel “Normal People” burst onto the scene last month, and has been making waves in the literary world since its...

Preview | Phoebe Dickinson: Journey Through Landscape at Tessa Packard Showroom

British painter From the 12th of November, BP Portrait Award 2018 nominee Phoebe Dickinson will unveil her new exhibition "Journey Through Landscape", a new...

Essay | ‘Time to Murder and Create’: When Fiction Bleeds into...

If I were to open by describing my setting  as a desk piled high with old issues of The London Magazine, the wine red May 1960 issue face down on top, rust-brown rimmed teacup marking the narrow No Man’s Land between the pile and my laptop, you would assume I were telling the truth. If I were to add that the red reminded me of blood spilled last week in rage and the brown rimmed cup of the plughole down which that blood spiraled, you would assume I was either lying or mad.

Review | Drive Your Plow Over the Bones of the Dead...

'It's Animals taking revenge on people.' Big Foot has died. Our narrator introduces us to an alarming situation in an almost mechanical tone. The newly...

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