Review | The Triumph of Cancer by Chris McCabe

The scientific language used by doctors to describe cancer—the uncontrollable growth of a single cell—is often mystifying and alienating. Can the experience of cancer better be expressed through poetry? McCabe’s latest poetry collection The Triumph of Cancer, a work searching for ways to articulate his father’s brain cancer, and in turn his own grief, attempts to deal with this...

News | The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year

Adam Weymouth was announced as the winner of The Sunday Times / Peters Fraser + Dunlop Young Writer of the Year award last night, at a reception at The London Library in St. James' Square. The annual prize seeks to reward the best work of fiction, non-fiction or poetry by British and Irish authors under the age of 35, and is...

Review | Summer and Smoke at The Duke of York’s Theatre

Briony WillisSummer & Smoke A poetic vision of human nature and our existential struggle to forge the middle ground between body and soul. After writing his (in)famous A Streetcar Named Desire, Tennessee Williams gave birth to Summer and Smoke in 1948, and The London Magazine had the pleasure of attending the latest adaptation by director Rebecca Frecknall held at the Duke of...

News | London’s BIG READ 2019 Shortlist

Last night saw the launch of London's BIG READ 2019, with the shortlisted authors announced last night at an event at LIBRARY on St Martin's Lane. The aim of London's BIG READ is to bring the city together through reading books that expand understanding of our community, and the initiative also raises money through a number of fundraising activities throughout the...

Review | Now, Now, Louison by Jean Frémon

Now, Now, Louison, Jean Frémon (translated by Cole Swensen), Les Fugitives, 2018, pp.115, £12.00 Now, Now, Louison, originally published in French as Calme-toi, Louison in 2016, is a strange and very beautiful book. An unusual but very touching tribute, it is a poetic meditation on the life of the artist Louise Bourgeois (1911 - 2010) written by her friend Jean Frémon (writer...

Review | Exposure by Olivia Sudjic

Exposure, Olivia Sudjic, Pensinsula Press, 2018, pp. 127, £6Exposure, the new book by Olivia Sudjic, elegantly dissects the multi-layered web of anxieties particular to the age in which we currently live. Exposure is the third of four impressive pocket essay books by the Peninsula Press, who launched earlier this with the publication David Wojnarowicz’s short fiction collection The Waterfront Journals....

Interview | 2018 Short Story Prize Judges!

With only a few weeks remaining for our Short Story Prize for this year, we thought we would catch up with our judges to ask them what they thought makes a good short story, and what they were looking for in the submissions. Read below for what their thoughts!About our judges:Samuel Fisher‘s debut novel, The Chameleon, was published by Salt...

Review | Theatre | The Unreturning at the Everyman Theatre

Frantic Assembly’s latest project “The Unreturning” arrives at Theatre Royal Stratford East in January 2019. This time, their celebrated physicality explores the lives of three Scarborough men returning from separate wars: a shell-shocked English serviceman returning from France in 1918, a dishonourably dismissed soldier returning from a military tour in Iraq in 2013, and finally, a refugee desperately trying...

Essay | Shakespeare’s London and the Emergence of the Playhouse

Today, the idea of the theatre can evoke tradition and history, having perhaps one of the longest histories of all the arts. But when the theatres first began springing up in London in the sixteenth and seventeenth century, they were places that transgressed and challenged social boundaries, and were considered dangerous by the well-to-do of the age.The Emergence of...

Staff Picks | The Best of Gothic Fiction

As it's Halloween, The London Magazine team have been discussing the nature of horror in fiction, and why we are so attracted to reading it. With it's desolate and wild settings, supernatural mysteries, and erotic fantasies, Gothic literature is a richly subversive genre which encapsulates the deeply-rooted fears of the human condition. Arising from a time of profound social change, Gothic...

Preview | The Turning of The Leaves at Union Chapel

Following last year's immersive multi-screen audio-visual installation for Remembrance Day, artist and poet Jack Miguel, filmmaker Taz Tron Delix and electronic musician Josh Grey-Jung return to Islington's Union Chapel on November 11th with The Turning of The Leaves, a continuation of their exploration of the effect of the First World War on contemporary masculinity. Drawing on research, interviews and participation...

Review | Medusa at Sadler’s Wells Theatre

Briony WillisMedusa Through beautifully poetic movements and engaging drama, Jasmin Vardimon has created a unique choreographic voice that enables her to explore deeply controversial social and political discourse. I had the pleasure of attending the opening show for her latest creation Medusa, a highly conceptual performance enriched with deep symbolism and motifs which offer an acute observation of human behaviour....

Review | Christian Marclay — The Clock at Tate Modern

Christian MarclayBlavatnik Building, level 2Tate ModernUntil 20th January 2019 “Time present and time past”, as T.S. Eliot famously claimed in Burnt Norton, are “both perhaps present in time future, and time future contained in time past.” So, “If all time is eternally present”, he suggests “All time is irredeemable.” These celebrated lines from The Four Quartets might well describe The...

Review | Limbo by Dan Fox

Following on from his brilliant attack on intellectual conservatism in 2016's Pretentiousness: Why It Matters, Dan Fox's new long-form essay Limbo finds the frieze editor all at sea.  Beginning by way of an examination of his own writer's block (and how we are pressured to resist moments to take a breath by a society of relentless economy), Fox moves from discussing the nature of...

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers like Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes found a home in the pages of the then newly re-launched volumes of the magazine. We want this tradition to continue, and given the renaissance of new independent publishers, we...

Preview | Phoebe Dickinson: Journey Through Landscape at Tessa Packard Showroom

British painter From the 12th of November, BP Portrait Award 2018 nominee Phoebe Dickinson will unveil her new exhibition "Journey Through Landscape", a new collection of urban and pastoral works which will be on display at the Tessa Packard Showroom in Chelsea until the 14th of December. The works were created during and inspired by her year of global...

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2018 – Winners Announced!

A huge thanks to everyone who entered this year's poetry prize! We had so many high quality entries this year which resulted in a huge longlist, but eventually our judges managed to whittle it down to the following three entries. All submissions were read anonymously.Here are the winners of The London Magazine Poetry Prize for 2018!1st prize: The Lean...

Interview | Momtaza Mehri — Young People’s Laureate for London

Yesterday we spoke to artist and poet Momtaza Mehri, who has recently been announced as Young People’s Laureate for London, who will take over from poet and musician Caleb Femi in the role which was launched by Spread The Word Last Year.

Feature | 7 Alternative London Novels

London. Michaelmas term lately over, and the Lord Chancellor sitting in Lincoln’s Inn Hall. Implacable November weather. As much mud in the streets as if the waters had but newly retired from the face of the earth… In the opening to Bleak House, Dickens did much to immortalise the city which is a setting for all his work, and whose...

Event | New River Press vs The London Magazine at Burley Fisher Books

On Thursday at Burley Fisher Books in East London, The London Magazine will be collaborating on an evening of poetry and spoken word with the poetry publishers New River Press.

The London Magazine Short Story Prize 2018

Submissions are now open for The London Magazine Short Story Prize 2018!The London Magazine has published short stories by some of the most well-respected literary figures over the course of long history, from Jean Rhys to V. S. Pritchett. Our annual Short Story Competition seeks out new voices to join them. 

Interview | Roubi L’Roubi | Saatchi Gallery | Forests and Spirits: Figurative art from the Khartoum School

An interview with Roubi L’Roubi, co-curator of Forests and Spirits: Figurative art from the Khartoum School, a new exhibition at the Saatchi Gallery.

Review | Focus Kazakhstan: Postnomadic Mind

Stepping into Wapping Hydraulic Power Station, originally built in 1890 to power the machinery of industrial London, the similarities between the history of the space and the exhibition currently situated within it become immediately apparent. With its spaces of former industry now playing host to bars and art galleries, it seems apt that London — the former 'factory of the...

Review | This is Memorial Device by David Keenan

Scottish music in 1983 This is Memorial Device, David Keenan, Faber and Faber, February 2017, pp.304, £14.99, (paperback) News of the death, back in June, of Bogdan Dochev, the Bulgarian linesman who failed to flag up Diego Maradona's handball in Argentina's win over England at the 1986 World Cup, prompted me to revisit some stills of that infamous goal: the diminutive forward...

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