Poetry | Two Poems by Andrew Wells

Andrew WellsTwo Poemsgoldfish poemeach corner laid bare like – see all corners laid before me – of what/ of the great big blue / what kind of I am readjusting to an interface of tidesif I compared satellites to peonies, would you still –all corners laid or left ajar like bright devices – I am sorry to mull notions of irregular lungs, surprisingly shallow images in all corners of the...

Non-fiction | The Pembridge Poets by Chris Rice

Chris RiceThe Pembridge Poets   On 17th June 1976, Robert Greacen (56, Northern Irish poet), hosted the first of his poetry workshops from his flat in Pembridge Crescent, Notting Hill Gate. Also present at the first meeting were: Peter Rodda (39, South African writer and activist), Tim Dooley (25, poet and English teacher), Matthew Sweeney (24, poet from Donegal), Gerald Clarke...

Poetry | Two Poems by Jasmine Gray

Jasmine GrayTwo Poems  decorativeyour vulnerability is that you are a joke you know you are a bruised peach you can pinpoint the date and time it all began you fear anyone who meets you now will know you want to slip inside cool water you will let him destroy you then wake up the next day and do his dishes you say okay and fine after saying...

Essay | William Blake at Calvary’s Foot and Sinai’s Cave by Niall McDevitt

Niall McDevittWilliam Blake at Calvary’s Foot and Sinai’s CaveWilliam Blake never travelled to Jerusalem. Instead, two of his masterpieces twin Britain with Jerusalem. The preface to Milton, ‘Jerusalem’ the lyric, imagines Christ visiting England. His final epic Jerusalem the Emanation of the Giant Albion imagines a mystical relationship between a male Albion and female Jerusalem. Both long poems were...

Interview | Pierre Demarty

Erik MartinyPierre Demarty  Pierre Demarty is a French publisher, writer and translator. His first book was longlisted for the prestigious Médicis and Flore prizes. Erik Martiny speaks to him about his latest provocative novel Death to Giraffes. Your latest novel, Mort aux girafes (Death to Giraffes), is composed of one two-hundred-page sentence. What motivated you to embark on such a risk-laden...

Fiction | Play by Martha Sprackland

Martha SpracklandPlay   It was the third time he’d been into the school. Again he felt uncomfortable, vulnerable. Why, if not about power, were the parents met here, in the middle area, and gestured to sit in these tiny, blue plastic chairs, rather than in the Head’s office? Or at least the staff room. The intended effect, he supposed, might be...

Podcast | Jessie Greengrass

PodcastJessie Greengrass   We spoke to author Jessie Greengrass about her new story in our June/July 2022 issue, 'A Lone Astronaut Watches the World End', as well as her 2021 novel 'The High House'. We discuss the role of the writer in the climate crisis, the power of the monologue and Jessie gives one of our listeners some great writing advice in...

Archive | The Fox by Adrian Mitchell

Adrian MitchellThe Fox A prolific poet whose verse tackled social injustice, nuclear disarmament, racism and violence, and was often declaimed at political demonstrations, Adrian Mitchell's 'The Fox' was published in the June 1954 issue of The London Magazine, edited by John Lehmann. A fox among the shadows of the town Should I surrender to the arms of man? .......On the blank icehills...

Review | Keith Ridgway’s A Shock and Leon Craig’s Parallel Hells by Hallam Bullock

Hallam BullockKeith Ridgway’s A Shock and Leon Craig’s Parallel Hells  In his seventh book, A Shock, Keith Ridgway is like a croupier, shuffling together southeast London lives and doling them out to the reader.The novel opens with an evening in the lonely life of an elderly widow. Whilst a party next door throbs through the walls, she drifts through her...

Essay | The ‘Borderland’ – Ukrainian Identity, Past and Present by Yva Alexandrova 

Yva AlexandrovaThe 'Borderland' - Ukrainian Identity, Past and Present It is Day 53 of the war in Ukraine and just this week I was thinking to myself, fearing, I was becoming used to or numb to the stories, the images, the horrors coming out of Ukraine. And then I saw a picture of a boy, Danylo, holding on to his cat...

Poetry | Two Poems from Limbic by Peter Scalpello

Peter ScalpelloTwo Poems from Limbic The following poems are from Peter Scalpello's collection Limbic, published by Cipher Press. The collection explores masculinity, queer joy, chemsex, the stigma around HIV, shame, and much more besides. To order a copy, visit Cipher Press.I Need A Breaknewsflash—i was three years old—so it wasn’t my fault—you don’t get over—something like that—effortlessly—it follows—you everywhere—makes you—a lovely low-life—all...

Interview | Ben Turnbull

Eric BlockBen Turnbull  On the eve of a major presentation of his sculptures in Bristol, ‘angry Pop Artist’ Ben Turnbull talks about the inspirations behind his work.Can you tell us why you have used church pews and hymn books to create these artworks?I'm always looking for a material or medium that can represent many layers which is why I've...

Essay | ‘Force, hatred, history’: James Joyce’s Ulysses at 100 by Daniel Mulhall

Daniel Mulhall‘Force, hatred, history’: James Joyce’s Ulysses at 100  James Joyce’s Ulysses was published in Paris on 2 February 1922, its author’s fortieth birthday. An American prosecution for obscenity against the editors of the avant-garde magazine, The Little Review, meant no British or American publisher was willing to bring out an edition of Joyce’s now-notorious novel. It was left to...

Interview | Isabelle Dangy

Erik MartinyAn Interview with Isabelle Dangy   Isabelle Dangy is an academic and novelist. Her main area of research is the nouveau roman and Georges Perec. In 2019, she was a finalist for the Goncourt Prize for debut novels. Her first two novels were published by les Editions du Passage, a long-established Parisian publisher partly specialized in art history.Your latest novel,...

Review | Words Fail Me by Christiana Spens

  Christiana SpensWords Fail Me: Violence, instability, and the limits of language in Aftermath by Preti Taneja (And Other Stories) and Commuters by Toby Christian (Koenig Books / Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther und Franz König)  In a recent essay for The New Yorker, The Case Against the Trauma Plot, Parul Sehgal wrote about the ways in which trauma has become a...

Interview | Psychogeography and Delivery Riding: Max Wilkinson on his new play ‘Rainer’

Max Wilkinson Psychogeography and Delivery RidingMax Wilkinson on his new play Rainer Rainer is playing at the Arcola Theatre's New Outside Space from the 1-18th of June, 2022 Max Wilkinson, a playwright from London, has always been fascinated by cities. Growing up in London, he spent most of his twenties cycling or walking across it between jobs to save on bus-fare, developing...

Interview | On the Pleasures of Observing the City: A London walk with Ana Kinsella by Madeleine Feeny

Madeleine FeenyOn the Pleasures of Observing the City: A London walk with Ana KinsellaLook Here, Ana Kinsella Daunt Books Publishing, Paperback, 26th May 2022, £9.99When, in March 2020, our freedom of movement was abruptly curtailed, our concept of the everyday was thrown abruptly off kilter. In lockdown, the unremarkable – working in an office, drinking in a pub, human touch – became...

Archive | Song of Sixpence by Samuel Selvon

Samuel SelvonSong of Sixpence   'Song of Sixpence' by Samuel Selvon was published in the August 1960 edition of The London Magazine edited by John Lehmann. A Trinidadian-born writer who moved to London in the 1950s, Selvon's work captured post-war London with a focus on the daily experiences of Caribbean and African settlers in the capital. He is perhaps best known...

Poetry | All Fools Day & Mischief by Frank Dullaghan

Frank DullaghanAll Fools Day & Mischief  All Fools DayIt’s an old joke – send a fool on a fruitless errand – a dozen cock eggs, a pound of elbow grease.In the Public Advertiser, April 13th, 1769, it is suggested that the idea of sending a person on such an errandwas based on the dove that Noah kept sending out to search for land. Of course, one...

Fiction | The Killer Moves Among Us by Anna Walsh

Anna WalshThe Killer Moves Among Us  Paula took a cold beer from the fridge and looked out the window. The rain pissed down mutinous as spit, the wintry sky and wet cobblestones dissolving into a single dark smudge. It was only four o’clock, and she had already done something wrong. .......It wasn’t a huge deal. This new agent, the one she’d...

Interview | Josselin Bordat

Erik MartinyAn Interview with Josselin Bordat   Josselin Bordat is a novelist, short story writer and television host and screenwriter whose work focuses on foregrounding the theme of sexuality in a humorous way. I decided to interview him about his latest collection 2069, a series of sci-fi short stories.Among other things, you direct a TV show on the major private channel...

Poetry | Natural Tuning Green Dusk for Dreams by Aaron Fagan

Aaron Fagan Natural Tuning Green Dusk for Dreams  Nothing exciting ever happens here because I fear I’m dead when I close my closed eyes As one who may have acquired a new way Of dying, yet—as my eyes are finally pried Open for others to see what the matter is— I am alone dreaming of you unable to wake Up, and the parts of the lost life...

Fiction | Still Life by Zoë Wicomb [EXTRACT]

Zoë WicombStill Life  A novel that looks at colonial legacy and issues of contemporary authorship, Zoë Wicomb's novel Still Life concerns the attempt of an author to write a biography of 19th century poet and abolitionist Thomas Pringle, sometimes known as the father of South African poetry. In her efforts to resurrect Pringle however, the writer summons the spectre of the former...

Interview | Malcolm Gaskill on witchcraft, gender-politics and being shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2022

 Malcolm Gaskill on witchcraft, gender-politics and being shortlisted for the Wolfson History Prize 2022  The Wolfson History Prize revealed its shortlist for 2022 in April, showcasing the best historical non-fiction titles from the previous year including Malcom Gaskill’s The Ruin of All Witches, a dark, fascinating, real-life tale of witch-hunting in colonial New England. A leading expert in the history...

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