My London by Tristram Fane Saunders

Home is a box on Coppermill Lane, caught in the crosshairs of Walthamstow High Street and Blackhorse Road. It’s a one-bed flat on two floors, too small to live alone in. Two people generate less clutter than one: with someone else about, we have a reason to live neatly. We supervise each other. My current supervisor is Henry, a playwright tending...

Talking Dead by Neil Rollinson

There is a danger when a poet sets out to record the ‘numinous in the everyday’, as Neil Rollinson’s most recent collection Talking Dead attempts, that they may limit themselves to merely documenting tedium and banality. The line between elevating the mundane and descending into the quotidian is a fine one, particularly in a form that allows for such...

The New World by Chris Adrian & Eli Horowitz

The New World Chris Adrian & Eli Horowitz Granta, £12.99 (paperback) The New World opens grippingly by immersing the reader in the consciousness of Jane, a surgeon who has just been informed that her husband has died. The onomastic similarities in the names Jim and Jane indicate from the outset that they are as close as it’s possible to be. The...

Art and Poetry by Byron Beynon

The relationship between painting and poetry, how poets and painters turn to one another for inspiration, has continued to be of interest for sometime. There are many examples of how art can inspire the writing of poetry, and the responses can take many forms. The historian Plutarch (c.46–120 A.D.) in his essay on the Glory of Athens quoted Simonides, a...

The London Magazine short story competition 2013 is now closed

We at The London Magazine want to say thank you to everyone who has entered the competition. We have had an overwhelming amount of submissions, which we are busy processing with at this time. You should receive your receipt of entry soon so we thank you for your patience. The calibre of entries this year has been outstanding and we are continually thankful for your support and...

Poetry | Michael O’Neill | A Tribute

Michael O’Neill (1953-2018) was a very gifted poet and a brilliant literary critic, who was Professor of English at the University of Durham, where he taught for nearly forty years. He published in the London Magazine during much of this time and was a friend of Alan Ross, who did much to encourage his poetic career. He published four...

The BFI London Film Festival

  The BFI London Film Festival is the UK’s largest and most star-studded film event. This year’s line-up includes 240 films from over 70 countries. Exhibiting both independent and mainstream films, the BFI truly has something for everybody, from historical romance to martial arts madness. While not everyone can swing tickets to galas and previews of the festival proper, here are our...

Art News | Zurab Tsereteli: Larger Than Life at the Saatchi Gallery

This month sees the first major UK retrospective of Georgian-Russian artist Zurab Tsereteli’s work, whose work will be on display at the Saatchi Gallery. Born in 1934 in Tbilisi, Georgia, the 85 year old Tsereteli will be displaying sculpture, paintings and enamel works from his early career until the present day, augmented with video archive footage that documents his life and...

A Response: Nicholas Royle, the Quaint and Sherbet Wit by Steven O’Brien

I am incredibly tickled to feature so prominently in Nicholas Royle’s introductory essay for Salt’s Best British Stories 2016. I have never met Nicholas, nor read his work and don’t know much about him, but his prissy comments about my role as editor of The London Magazine are a sheer delight. A public attack of such sherbet vehemence seems...

No Map Could Show Them by Helen Mort

No Map Could Show Them, Mort’s second collection, explores the narratives of Victorian and modern women –mountaineers, campaigners, runners – and considers, more broadly, the marks, narratives and pathways we leave, or don’t leave, behind us. The opening poem, ‘Mountain’, serves as an introduction in which geology meets female body: ‘Your stomach is a boulder. /To hold you up,...

Enter to win tickets to ‘MEOW MEOW’ at the West End

With thanks to boom ents, The London Magazine is excited to give you a chance to win a pair of theatre tickets to see MEOW MEOW this summer!   Making her Wonderground debut, International Singing Sensation and post-post-modern showgirl MEOW MEOW is back in London for three weeks only.   Following her trail-blazing shows in the West End, concerts with the London Philharmonic...

'A Message' from T. S. Eliot

In 1954, editor Alan Ross introduced a new incarnation of The London Magazine. To mark the re-launch of the Magazine, T.S Eliot wrote “A Message”, published in Volume 1 Issue 1 in February 1954. The article, addressed, “...primarily to those English readers, at home and overseas, who profess to take an interest in literature,” captures something of the enduring spirit...

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood

The Heart Goes Last Margaret Atwood Bloomsbury, £18.99 Reworked from an e-serial, Atwood’s latest novel is as captivating and humorous as her previous work. The America inhabited by her focal characters, Stan and Charmaine, is steeped in the twenty-first century equivalent of the Great Depression. The unemployment rate in the hardest hit East Coast area has soared up to 40%, almost twice...

Country Living Christmas Fair Giveaway

Enter a giveaway and win a pair of tickets for the Country Living Christmas Fair! All you need to do is sign in through Facebook and like The London Magazine page to enter! Free Country Living Fair Tickets //d12vno17mo87cx.cloudfront.net/embed/rafl/cptr.js

TLM Young Poets Competition 2013

Please note. This competition is now closed. Thank you to everyone who entered. UPDATE: Due to the volume of submissions, it has taken us a little while longer to judge. The winners will now be in the October/November issue. Please stay tuned for more details. The London Magazine is delighted to announce our first Young Poets Competition, open to anyone aged between 16-30...

Fiction | Virtual Self by Lydia Rachel Figes

Lydia Rachel Figes Virtual Self I'm always here. While you are asleep, the world I inhabit continues to revolve. Constantly refreshing like a never ending digital carousel. Why resist my electric impact? I'm omnipresent; I'll still be here tomorrow. My creation was inevitable, but my relationship with you, my subject, is far more complex. We know each other intimately. I'm wired into your...

Editor Steven O’Brien to judge national competition, “A Poem to Remember”, for DNRC

The Defence and National Rehabilitation Centre (DNRC) today launched an exciting new national poetry competition to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War and celebrate the creation of a world leading clinical rehabilitation facility for the Armed Forces. Called ‘A Poem to Remember’ and inspired by the Great War Poets of the First World War,...

The Heart Goes Last by Margaret Atwood

In 2009, Ursula K. Le Guin caused something of a stir in the science-fiction community by contradicting Atwood’s claim that her novels belonged to the ‘Speculative Fiction’ genre, as opposed to that of straight sci-fi (if such a thing exists). This generic disagreement between the two literary giants has since been resolved with a mutual agreement on the permeability...

The Lighthouse by Michael Shann

The Lighthouse Markhouse Road So far from the wine-dark sea, a displaced monument to faith and absurdity at the turn of a neat, Victorian street. Still, the treacherous rocks are everywhere: poverty, debt, addiction, the old lure of a luxurious life. So perhaps Captain King was right, calling the people to prayer, not with a bell, but with a light. The Lighthouse is a Methodist Church on Markhouse Road...

Interview | Richard Baker on winning the 2019 HIX Award

This year’s HIX Award attracted more than 600 entrants and, as founder Mark Hix admits, it was very tough trying to pick a winner from the final fifteen. After much deliberation, the judges of the 2019 HIX Award, Tate Director Maria Balshaw and Head of the Royal Academy Schools Eliza Bonham Carter, selected Richard Baker for his painting Hall...

Interview | Joo Yeon Park on Beckett, Failure and ‘the Unword’

'If you are to fail, you might as well, as Beckett put it, 'fail better'; you might as well volunteer to fail. And failure is, possibly, a necessity in art-making, and it's not necessarily a negative thing in art. It can prove to be a turning-point, to open up a space for discussion, for something that you haven’t expected to see or experience. So it can be a positive thing, so I think there's a double-edged sword in what Beckett means by failure.' […]

Fiction | Reward System by Jem Calder [EXTRACT]

Jem Calder Reward System   The following text is reproduced with permission from Jem Calder‘s debut collection of short stories, Reward System, examining office culture, pandemics and break-ups, and a young generation wondering 'what now?'. To order a copy, visit Faber. Six white males between the ages of twenty-seven and fifty-five are seated in a room. Their Friday late-morning conference call is over,...

Tickets to London History Festival

The 6th London History Festival will be taking place in Kensington on Nov 12 - 27th. Talks start at 7.00pm. Hear bestselling authors such as Charles Spencer, Adam Zamoyski, Helen Castor and David Reynolds - and join in the debates. Tickets are just £5 (and £3 concessions). For further details about the festival please see http://www.londonhistoryfestival.com/ The London Magazine has been given 10...

A Discrete Disclosure by Desmond King

Frank’s Englishness was all about him for he dressed in country wear:  tweed sports jackets, check shirts, Burberry rain macs, and a perpetual woollen flat cap.  One could spot him two hundred metres away in a Paris street.  In many ways his personality matched his dress style for he had firm conservative views on most things.  Once, although he...

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