Madonna and Child by Hugh Dunkerley

Don’t believe the lies: Joseph was a randy little sod. That’s why we had to leave, go back to Bethlehem where he told his family I was pregnant with the son of God. Even they didn’t believe him and chucked us out, telling us we could bunk down in the stable, knowing what an animal he was. And there were no wise men, that was just more wishful thinking. But the...

Smoothly from Harrow, but a Bit Late by Chris Moss

Chris Moss traces the literary journey of the commuter and celebrates his arrival as a 21st century Everyman “Man is born free, and is everywhere in trains,” wrote Roger Green in his 1984 book Notes from Overground. Green, who used the pen name Tiresias (the blind prophet) for his rambling, ranting, insightful collection of carriage-seat-observations, was asking his fellow commuters on...

Interview | Elizabeth Eade at HIX ART

HIX ART is currently presenting I know you are but what am I, the first major solo exhibition by acclaimed British artist Elizabeth Eade. In this new series of installations, Eade playfully and powerfully continues her exploration of a range of social and political issues. In 2018, Eade won the celebrated HIX Award, judged by the likes of Tracey Emin and Gavin Turk, with her piece Die Liste — a ten-metre-long handwritten list documenting the deaths [...]

Kenneth Womack | The Making of Penny Lane

The following is an extract from Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin (The Later Years: 1966-2016) by Kenneth Womack, published by Orphans Publishing, 2018.  Republished in The London Magazine with permission.  ...By January 1967, record-company brass on both sides of the Atlantic were clamoring for new Beatles product posthaste. And their concerns naturally cascaded around manager Brian...

The London Magazine sponsors the Joze Art Fair

From the 8th - 11th March the Joze Art Fair will be exhibiting a diverse range of artists in the unique surroundings of The Library Space, an Edwardian former school library. For further information, please go to: www.jozeartfair.com

One Thousand Things Worth Knowing by Paul Muldoon and Sentenced to Life by Clive James

These are two very contrastive books both making a clear announcement through their titles. The first is brash, claiming something unbelievable, just as the German author Karl May, author of Winnetou, claimed to speak more than 1000 languages. Perhaps something about Paul Muldoon’s meeting with America has also made him feel entitled to be just as bold and brash as...

Collyer Bristow Prize Shortlist Announcement

The London Magazine is very pleased to announce the shortlist for a brand new literary award in partnership with Collyer Bristow: The London Magazine and Collyer Bristow Prize for a Debut Work of Fiction 2018 This is Memorial Device - David Keenan (Faber & Faber) Darker with the Lights On - David Hayden (Little Island Press)  Safe Mode - Sam Riviere (Test Centre)  Sympathy...

TLM Young Poets Competition 2013

Please note. This competition is now closed. Thank you to everyone who entered. UPDATE: Due to the volume of submissions, it has taken us a little while longer to judge. The winners will now be in the October/November issue. Please stay tuned for more details. The London Magazine is delighted to announce our first Young Poets Competition, open to anyone aged between 16-30...

Review | La Forza Del Destino at the Royal Opera House

The Royal Opera House has brought together the best cast in the world right now for their new production of Verdi’s La Forza Del Destino. La Forza Del Destino is about Don Alvaro accidentally killing the father of his love, Leonora, with both of them escaping separately from the murderous wroth of Leonora’s brother Don Carlo Di Vargas, it...

Review | Young Rembrandt & Nicolaes Maes: Dutch Master of the Golden Age

The similarities between the life paths of the 17th century Dutch painters Nicolaes Maes (1634-1693) and Rembrandt (1606-1669) are intriguing. Both grew up in small town Holland, both were apprenticed to local painters at an early age, both moved to Amsterdam to work with a master, both returned to their home towns to perfect their own style, both ended their lives in Amsterdam to which each had returned as their careers began to burgeon [...]

Interview with Reif Larsen

American novelist Reif Larsen is the author of New York Times bestseller The Selected Works of T. S. Spivet. The book, tracing the great trajectory of twelve year old genius cartographer T.S. was also adapted into a film by director Jean-Pierre Jeunet (Amélie) last year. Now Larsen has produced his second work, I Am Radar, which was published in...

‘These Shining Lives’ at Park Theatre: A Review

The little red card which revealed my seat number beneath the ‘Park Theatre’ logo, led me into the intimate space which was the crux of the £2.5 million project, the ‘brainchild’ of Artistic Director Jez Bond. As I waited in the square and darkly lit room, the floor of the stage gleamed, still glossy, reflecting the light which was...

Social Contract by Rachel Willems

The politeness, not leaving any butter in the jam, or jam in the butter, or shoes in the hall. Not leaving any residue of who did what. Not leaving, for that matter. One glass of wine while I make dinner, while I rub our cut of salmon with honey and salt, you read me the news—our division of labor. In the tundra, in the burrow...

Staff Picks | The Best of Gothic Fiction

As it's Halloween, The London Magazine team have been discussing the nature of horror in fiction, and why we are so attracted to reading it. With it's desolate and wild settings, supernatural mysteries, and erotic fantasies, Gothic literature is a richly subversive genre which encapsulates the deeply-rooted fears of the human condition. Arising from a time of profound social change, Gothic...

News | The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year

Adam Weymouth was announced as the winner of The Sunday Times / Peters Fraser + Dunlop Young Writer of the Year award last night, at a reception at The London Library in St. James' Square. The annual prize seeks to reward the best work of fiction, non-fiction or poetry by British and Irish authors under the age of 35, and is...

Replete by Maggie Butt

Replete by Maggie Butt
Replete Enough of beauty - I have devoured small boats curtseying at anchor, green palace-dotted hills swarming the spice-scented shore of Asia Minor. I couldn’t chew another mouthful of waves, scything and winnowing light with the wash of every passing craft, and each heave of the ocean’s breath. Well, maybe just one last taste, seasoned with a pinch of myrrh: the taxi driver says, ‘Today hot but slow, slow, winter comes…”         Degrees...

Macbeth

Scotland herself is the main character in this blood-soaked reimagining of Shakespeare's shortest tragedy. So enamoured is director Justin Kurzel of his Highland landscape that it becomes his focal point: a gaping maw of brutal heights and contours before the poor players. This is a cold pagan place, where the respite from war and rain is never very long. From...

Mary Wollstonecraft Open Weekend

In celebration of Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797), author, early feminist and human rights advocate, teacher, and mother of Mary Shelley, the artist and publisher Louisa Albani will be hosting an open weekend at St Pancras Old church in collaboration with Heritage Open Days. The event comes off the back of Albani's recent pamphlet Ghost Ship, which was inspired by Mary Wollstonecraft's Letters from...

DSC Prize Shortlist Revealed

The world’s literati gathered at the historic London School of Economics and Political Science on Thursday, 27th November, as the shortlist for the fifth annual DSC Prize for South Asian Literature 2015 was announced. Making the esteemed shortlist is a dynamic mix of new and established writers as well as a translated work. This year’s shortlist of five features two...

Review | Now, Now, Louison by Jean Frémon

Now, Now, Louison, Jean Frémon (translated by Cole Swensen), Les Fugitives, 2018, pp.115, £12.00 Now, Now, Louison, originally published in French as Calme-toi, Louison in 2016, is a strange and very beautiful book. An unusual but very touching tribute, it is a poetic meditation on the life of the artist Louise Bourgeois (1911 - 2010) written by her friend Jean Frémon (writer...

Men by Belinda Rule

I only like imaginary men, the ones who think my art is the most transporting thing they have ever seen, and I am exactly as hilarious as I actually, actually am. Even then, even then not really. Maybe I’d rather walk off into the dark, chew the trees, burrow, make a hat of yellow fireweed big as a child (that I won’t have). Perhaps in the end forget my own name, which might, actually, be for the...

Archive | Memories of Modigliani by Anna Akhmatova

First published in the August 1964 edition of the London Magazine (Vol. 4 No.5) (translated from the Italian text by Bernard Wall) I can well believe those other people who describe him differently from what he was as I knew him, and this is why. I only knew one aspect of his nature (the grandiose one); I was only an outsider,...

Poetry | Ants on City Walls by Manash Firaq Bhattacharjee

Manash Firaq Bhattacharjee Ants on City Walls Think Neither fear nor courage saves us. Unnatural vices Are fathered by our heroism. Virtues Are forced upon us by our impudent crimes. ~ T.S. Eliot, Gerontion Here we are, in the cruellest month, to choose Our future, marked on our finger. Will we survive the lie? The fate of truth hangs in balance. What we Choose for us, we choose for others. The...

Review | The Triumph of Cancer by Chris McCabe

The scientific language used by doctors to describe cancer—the uncontrollable growth of a single cell—is often mystifying and alienating. Can the experience of cancer better be expressed through poetry? McCabe’s latest poetry collection The Triumph of Cancer, a work searching for ways to articulate his father’s brain cancer, and in turn his own grief, attempts to deal with this...

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