Interview | Bahia Shehab: At the Corner of a Dream at the Aga Khan Centre Gallery

Eric Block Bahia Shehab: At the Corner of a Dream at the Aga Khan Centre Gallery The acclaimed Egyptian-Lebanese artist, designer, educator and street art activist Bahia Shehab’s work first came to global attention when she played an active role in the Arab Spring in 2011. Shehab used calligraffiti stencil works which she sourced from words written on mosques, plates, textiles, pottery and books from various countries, and spray...

Interview | Richard Baker on winning the 2019 HIX Award

This year’s HIX Award attracted more than 600 entrants and, as founder Mark Hix admits, it was very tough trying to pick a winner from the final fifteen. After much deliberation, the judges of the 2019 HIX Award, Tate Director Maria Balshaw and Head of the Royal Academy Schools Eliza Bonham Carter, selected Richard Baker for his painting Hall...

Fiction | Sell Your Past and Buy Yourself a Future! by Maurizio Ascari

This story is an extract from My Europe, edited by Anna Johnson and Anna Vaught, Manningtree, Patrician Press, 2018, pp. 13-22. Maurizio Ascari Sell Your Past and Buy Yourself a Future! I had been thinking of selling my house for a while. Since I retired I had cherished the idea of relocating and starting a new life. Far from the northern city...

Review | Robyn Denny: Works on Paper

Charlie Dixon Robyn Denny: Works on Paper Robyn Denny’s work soared with the post-war momentum of 60’s London, helping to define the visual culture of a generation. Whilst Denny is perhaps better known for large scale murals, including public installations, Robyn Denny: Works on Paper sheds new light on a previously overlooked element of his practice. Spanning the length of the artist’s...

News | Collyer Bristow Prize: Caoilinn Hughes wins for Orchid & the Wasp

The Collyer Bristow Prize for Debut Fiction 2019, now in its second year, has been awarded to Caoilinn Hughes for her novel Orchid & the Wasp, a Bildungsroman about Gael Foess, a young woman navigating Dublin, London and New York, as she strives to build a life raft for her loved-ones amidst economic and familial collapse [...]

News | Caoilinn Hughes, on winning the Collyer Bristow Prize 2019

Caoilinn Hughes On winning the Collyer Bristow Prize First thanks go to my peers—Sophie Mackintosh, Danny Denton, Samuel Fisher and Katherine Kilalea—for writing such good books that it was an intimidation and an honour to be on this shortlist with them. Thank you to the judges of this prize because, to me at least, books don’t exist without readers, and it...

Interview | Elise Ansel: yes I said Yes at Cadogan Contemporary

As arguably the biggest week in the London art-world calendar sets in, there is a striking exhibition on display at Cadogan Contemporary in which the acclaimed American artist Elise Ansel reclaims female identity from the old master paintings [...]

Interview | Kristina Marie Darling

Kristina Marie Darling is an author and literary critic. Her book Je Suis L’Autre: Essays & Interrogations was named one of the 'Best Books of 2017' by The Brooklyn Rail, with her collection Dark Horse: Poems (C&R Press, 2018) receiving a notable review in Publishers Weekly. Darling currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of Tupelo Press and Tupelo Quarterly, as an opinion columnist at The Los Angeles...

Interview | Cultural Traffic founder Toby Mott on Arts Fairs and Counter-culture

Eric Block Cultural Traffic interview: Arts Fairs and Counter-culture The roving global arts and publishing fair, Cultural Traffic, will hold its fourth London edition at Old Spitalfields Market on Saturday 5th of October 2019. It happens during Frieze, but it’s free of charge. Eric Block met its founder, punk historian Toby Mott, read the full interview below. Toby Mott, why did you start...

Review | A Chip Shop in Poznań by Ben Aitken

A Chip Shop in Poznań, Ben Aitken, Icon Books, £10.50 (paperback) Ben Aitken arrived in Poland, he writes, ‘just after Cameron came to Warsaw to cut the Poles some slack’ and left ‘with the sound of the triggered article still ringing in my ears’. In 2016, as the UK was on the verge of an unprecedented schism over Brexit,...

Interview | AlanJames Burns on Entirely Hollow Aside from the Dark

This September sees a powerful art event transform the unique setting of Cresswell Crags Cave, Nottinghamshire. In complete darkness, visual and environmental artist AlanJames Burns stages a psychoacoustic sound artwork entitled Entirely hollow aside from the dark [...]

Review | Dragonfly by Jari Moate

Dragonfly, Jari Moate, Tangent Books, 2018, pp.300, £8.99 (paperback) Jari Moate’s novel Dragonfly begins with an ex-soldier known only as Marine P who, after serving in Syria, ensconces himself in an abandoned chocolate factory in Bristol. But what happens next is far from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory as P must battle both his inner demons and the malevolent forces...

News | Collyer Bristow Prize 2019 shortlist announced

The London Magazine has announced the 2019 shortlist for the Collyer Bristow Prize for debut fiction. Now in its second year, the prize celebrates exceptional literary fiction, inviting publishers to submit one debut work of fiction published in the calendar year 2018. The shortlist, which features outstanding, original writing published in the UK, is: The Chameleon by Samuel Fisher (Salt...

Review | 58th Venice Biennale

Venice, that city of dreams and the inspiration for artists and writers from Turner to Italo Calvino, sees its 58th art biennale. As thousands flock to the event the gorgeous palazzi sink ever further into the lagoon, damaged by the huge commercial cruise ships that daily disgorge yet more tourists into the fragile infrastructure. A fitting image of our...

Interview | Alan Trotter

Alan Trotter is a writer based in Edinburgh. Muscle, his debut novel, was awarded the inaugural Sceptre Prize for a novel in progress. He has written short fiction for Somesuch Stories, Under the Influence, McSweeney's Internet Tendency and the Electronic Literature Collection, as well as a digital story for phones called All This Rotting. His remarkable debut novel Muscle manages...

Review | 2019 Bienalsur

What happens when a bold new take on the Biennale comes face-to-face with a new national cultural movement?  For those of us tired of art world hype and cynical glitz the 2019 Bienalsur provided reassurance that humanity may not be doomed after all. Bienalsur is the Southern Hemisphere’s Biennale.  The 2019 Bienalsur, its second, opened in Buenos Aires this week. ...

Kahani Near Sloane Square…Oh Those Lamb Chops!

I have been to expansive Sikh restaurants in Southall and frenetic Pakistani grills in Whitechapel. I once had a very good jalfrezi in Dublin. I have even been to the original Moti Mahal in Delhi where they serve punchy tandoori chicken to the hypnotic sobbing of a live Qawwali singer. However, I’ve never eaten Indian ‘fine dining.’ So Kahani,...

Extract | Tony and Eve by Eve Hall

From the forthcoming memoir by Phil Hall Steinhardt, Tony and Eve.  My heroine of very early days was Joan of Arc, whom I loved passionately. I dreamed of martyrdom and detested the English soldiers who burned her at the stake.  Every Friday afternoon I used to wait for my mother outside my boarding school, buttoned up snuggly into my Petite Madeleine...

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2019

Update: Submissions for The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2019 are now CLOSED! Over the years The London Magazine has been home to some of the most prestigious poets in its long publishing history, from John Keats to Sylvia Plath and Derek Walcott. Our annual Poetry Prize seeks out new voices in poetry, providing a platform for publication in the UK’s oldest literary...

Review | Whip-Hot & Grippy by Heather Phillipson

Whip-Hot & Grippy begins with a hyphen and ends with a personal statement, with the intervening 126 pages featuring advertising-speak, sex scenes, terrorism, broadcast media, consumption-anxiety, protest, and human-animal relations. Ian Macmillan described Phillipson’s debut Instant Flex 718 as a ’bucket of water in the face’, and Whip-Hot & Grippy — with its psychedelic cover of a cat ambiguously...

Review | Skylon Deeply Savoury on the South Bank

I hardly ever go across the river to the south side. I cannot stand the man-boys ruckling along on their skateboards. Yet go we did, over the footbridge just outside Embankment tube station, on a dull Friday morning. The skaters were not getting any younger and the hipsters still show no sign of giving up their promenade. We were off...

Poetry | Ants on City Walls by Manash Firaq Bhattacharjee

Manash Firaq Bhattacharjee Ants on City Walls Think Neither fear nor courage saves us. Unnatural vices Are fathered by our heroism. Virtues Are forced upon us by our impudent crimes. ~ T.S. Eliot, Gerontion Here we are, in the cruellest month, to choose Our future, marked on our finger. Will we survive the lie? The fate of truth hangs in balance. What we Choose for us, we choose for others. The...

Feature | Inside Dennis Severs’ House

I arrive outside the black wooden door of Dennis Severs' House, knock gently on the door, and wait under the gas lantern which hangs outside. I had been told that visiting the red brick Georgian house at 18 Folgate was an experience like no other, that it was constructed in pieces over decades until it became a living, breathing...

Archive | Leaving School—XI by Ann Quin

The following piece by the post-war experimental writer Ann Quin (1936-1973) was originally published in the July 1966 issue of The London Magazine, but was last year re-published in the sublime collection of short stories and fragments The Unmapped Country (ed. Jennifer Hodgson, And Other Stories, 2018). Ann Quin Leaving School—XI Bound by perverse securities in a Convent, RC Brighton for eight...

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