9 of Europe’s Best Bookshops

A good bookshop can be many different things - a haven from the world, a counter-cultural space, and a meeting point for friends, as well as somewhere, to, you know, buy books. It's perhaps for this reason that despite the numerous death knells that have been called over the last 50 or so years, physical spaces to buy books...

Degrees of Twilight by Maggie Butt

The London Magazine Editions is delighted to present the fifth collection from critically acclaimed poet Maggie Butt, Degrees of Twilight. The passage of time is tangible in Maggie Butt’s fifth collection. These poems use history, memory, work and travel as lenses to examine the inevitable pains and sharp pleasures at the heart of our transient lives. Maggie Butt is a poet who...

Two Collections from Copper Canyon Press

When Richard Siken's first collection, Crush, was awarded the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize in 2004, it won Louise Glück's praise for its 'cumulative, driving, apocalyptic power' and was quickly shortlisted for a series of prizes, winning the Thom Gunn Award in 2006. In the intervening decade, few American poets came close to an equally well-received debut –...

Review | Russian Roulette: The Life and Times of Graham Greene by Richard Greene

Biographers have three ways of dealing with their predecessors. They can generously thank them, ignore their achievement, or viciously attack them. Richard Greene (no relation to Graham) misleadingly links Michael Shelden’s deeply flawed book (l994) with Norman Sherry’s impressive three-volume 2,250-page work (1989-2004). Sherry conducted many interviews with Graham from 1904-91, and his first two volumes were perceptive and convincing. Richard calls [...]

Review | Dragonfly by Jari Moate

Dragonfly, Jari Moate, Tangent Books, 2018, pp.300, £8.99 (paperback) Jari Moate’s novel Dragonfly begins with an ex-soldier known only as Marine P who, after serving in Syria, ensconces himself in an abandoned chocolate factory in Bristol. But what happens next is far from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory as P must battle both his inner demons and the malevolent forces...

News | The London Magazine Debut Fiction Prize 2020 shortlist announced

This year, the judges have remarked on the extraordinary variety of offerings that is reflected in their shortlist and Matthew Scott, the chair of judges, comments that "though it's a cliché that the quality of submissions is ever improving, the excited enthusiasm of the judges across the board does seem to bear this out: it has been a rich year, and a wonderful one for reading - a rare positive in an otherwise extremely difficult time [...]

North London Literary Festival by Heather Wells

Several prize-winning authors and publishers will be in Hendon on the 26th and 27th March to attend a free two-day literary festival held at Middlesex University. The festival is hoping to engage lovers of literature in the local community with authors such as Andrew Simms and Lucy Caldwell with Faber in attendance. James Herbert OBE was due to appear at...

The London Magazine’s Young Poets Competition Announcement

The London Magazine is delighted to announce the winners of our first Young Poets Competition. We would like to thank everyone who participated in this competition.   The winners: 1st Place: ‘Translated’ by Olivia Hanks 2nd Place: ‘Cleft in Ullswater’ by Charlie La Fosse 3rd Place: ‘Night Ride Home’ by Sean Hewitt   The winners will be invited to our October Party at the Cock n’...

Ibsen – by Stephen Unwin

Henrik Ibsen (1828-1906): the great dramatist of the modern world  Henrik Ibsen has been much misrepresented, especially in Britain.  His contemporaries tended to see him as the master anatomist of decadence and disease, and read his plays with a mixture of guilty recognition and spluttering outrage.  Bernard Shaw in The Quintessence of Ibsenism (1891) tried to claim him as a...

Review | Letters To A First Love From The Future by Andy Armitage

Andy Armitage's pamphlet is among a number of new releases from the poetry press Half-Moon Books, which is based in Otley, West Yorkshire, where a local group of poets have developed, and where there are a number of regular events and meetings. Half-Moon Books came into existence to support this diverse and motivated group of writers, and judging on...

TLM Short Story Competition, Winner Announcement

The 2012 London Magazine short Story competition prizes were awarded at a champagne reception on the House of Commons terrace on Tuesday 22nd January. The first prize of £500 went to Sophie Hampton. Mary O’Shea and Neil Herrington were awarded second and third prizes respectively. The judges for the competition were Edna O’Brien, Cathy Galvin and Alison Macleod. The competition...

New Voices from the Tower Hamlets Schools

SLAMbassadors Showcase, 14th July 2016 Close your eyes, and try to remember the last time a thirteen-year-old implored you to 'rise up and change the twisted reality this world has made', in those words. Drawing a blank? Now try and picture this: a darkened theatre in the heart of the West End, a wildly applauding audience of teachers, librarians, school...

The London Magazine Short Story Prize 2021

Submissions are now CLOSED for The London Magazine's Short Story Prize 2021.  The London Magazine has published short stories by some of the most well-respected literary figures over the course of its long history, from Jean Rhys to Raymond Carver and V.S. Pritchett. Our annual Short Story Competition seeks out new voices to join them. Established to encourage emerging literary talent,...

Short Story Competition: A word from the Judges

With just a few weeks left till the end of our annual Short Story Competition we spoke to the Judges to find out exactly what the short story means to them.  Today we spoke to Alessandro Gallenzi, writer, publisher and founder of Alma Books about writers, short stories and what to read to be inspired.  What do you look for in a short story?  Economy of language,...

Archive | Poetry | Rin Ishigaki

Known in Japan as the 'bank clerk poet', with her work frequently featuring in the bank newsletter where she was employed, Ishigaki's poetry stretches from the dreariness of domestic life to more complicated implications relating to Japan's history of conflict. Never before reprinted, two poems have now been transcribed in full from our archive. First published in the Feb/March 1976...

Poetry Competition: Final Call For Poetry Submissions

This is the final call for The London Magazine’s worldwide poetry competition: we’re closing for entries in less than two weeks!   The competition presents you with an outstanding chance for your work to be published in the UK’s the oldest and most prestigious literary journal in the UK, which has published the works of Sylvia Plath, Ted Hughes and Christopher...

Staff Picks – May 2018

The London Magazine's May Staff Picks! Recommendations for the very best in arts, culture and literature from the staff at The London Magazine. Steven O’Brien – Editor The Academy Club, 46 Lexington St, Soho, London W1F 0LP The Academy Club is the last SoHo writers club where people can drink from the afternoon until midnight talking about books.   Lucy Binnersley - Assistant Editor 'Absolute...

Interview | Sinéad Gleeson on Solidarity in Sickness, Isolation and Empathy

Jack Solloway Sinéad Gleeson on Solidarity in Sickness, Isolation and Empathy   With the UK government currently advising ‘social distancing’ and the country expecting further preventative measures against the coronavirus pandemic, Sinéad Gleeson’s debut book Constellations: Reflections from Life – a collection of essays about the body, medicine, politics and art – could not have come at a more interesting time. Shortlisted...

Easter Island by Fiona Brenninkmaker

Charting the evolution of Easter Island wooden carvings from spiritual receptacle to auction treasure. Allow me to take you on a small journey to Easter Island.  It is known to many but only through a veil of mystery and romanticism. Lying 3000 km from mainland, a good five to six hour plane journey from Chile. It is the furthest East...

The Southern Universities Short Story Competition Winners Announcement

We delighted to announce the winning entries of The Southern Universities Short Story Competition In no particular order: • The Coach's Wife by Michael J. Vowles • Stray Dog by Michael J. Vowles • Signed, Harry Goldstein by Sam McNeilly • Sugar Rush by Richard Axtell • Edgware Road by Jacqui Pack • Mother Long Dead by Harry Gallon • On January by Harry Gallon • Red Axe...

Review | ‘Sleepless’ and ‘If On a Winter’s Night a Traveller’ at the Mamoth Gallery

The figure is wearing pyjamas and a pensive expression. He juggles, or simply tries to catch, a piece of falling fruit, the parent of which coils its leaves against a clouded orange backdrop. He is the subject of A Dream (2019), one of a series of paintings by Düsseldorf-based artist Lenz Geerk. Sleepless, as the name suggests, is the result of its creator’s insomnia, and is one of two exhibitions at the newly-launched Mamoth contemporary gallery in Bloomsbury [...]

Staff Picks | The Best of Gothic Fiction

As it's Halloween, The London Magazine team have been discussing the nature of horror in fiction, and why we are so attracted to reading it. With it's desolate and wild settings, supernatural mysteries, and erotic fantasies, Gothic literature is a richly subversive genre which encapsulates the deeply-rooted fears of the human condition. Arising from a time of profound social change, Gothic...

PAGES by Heather Wells

… is a newly-launched online book retailer that encourages and inspires independent thought.   They offer a very selective choice of books by independent and self-publishers, not just literary but books on architecture and cookery too, so as to offer you a wide range of brilliantly written and illustrated books that you may not necessarily find at the big book retailer.   With...

One Thousand Things Worth Knowing by Paul Muldoon and Sentenced to Life by Clive James

These are two very contrastive books both making a clear announcement through their titles. The first is brash, claiming something unbelievable, just as the German author Karl May, author of Winnetou, claimed to speak more than 1000 languages. Perhaps something about Paul Muldoon’s meeting with America has also made him feel entitled to be just as bold and brash as...

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