The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2016 | Judges

The London Magazine's annual Poetry Prize seeks out new writers whose work is adventurous, innovative and surprising in both form and content. We are very...

That Boy by Robert Nazarene

  He was patient as a dead bird. He perched on the ledge of bottom and rocked.  He was the missed flight. He was silence calmed down. He loved...

The London Magazine Short Story Competition 2016 | Winners

Thank you so much to everyone who entered The London Magazine's Short Story Competition 2016. We were delighted to see such a large volume and high standard...

Interview | Jonathan Simons on Analog Sea, Neo-Romanticism and ‘The Contemplative...

'The discomfort of boredom is never something human beings have liked, but reality and nature and the lack of technology, and the rudimentary qualities of technology, pushed back on us. The friction that we want to eradicate is defined by boredom and old age and sickness and death, and we need these things to be human, and we need these things to have interesting, vital arts and letters as well.'

Bram Bogart at the Saatchi Gallery

SALON, Saatchi Gallery’s commercial exhibition space, launched earlier this year with a fascinating show by the post-war Japanese artist, Tsuyoshi Maekawa, and in keeping...

Short Story Competition 2017

UPDATE: EXTENDED CLOSING DATE  The competition will now be open for entries until November 15th. Autumn is just around the corner, which means The London Magazine‘s...

Short Story Competition | Prize-Giving Ceremony

On Tuesday 28th March 2016 The London Magazine awarded the winners of the Short Story Competition 2016 during a drinks reception on the House of Commons Terrace. The prizes...

An interview with Ben Ehrenreich

Just south of the village, Nabi Saleh, there is a spring. It is called Ein al Qoos or the Bow Spring. Palestinian farmers have...

Fiction | Blood Brothers by Jessica Andrews

When we were splattered with freckles and tied up in pigtails, we picked sharp rocks from the garden and pushed them into each other’s wrists, our flesh tender and white like peeled crabs. I remember the way our wounds looked, mushy and filled with pieces of grit. ‘Now we are blood brothers,’ I said. She looked at me from behind her nose. 'Blood sisters,’ she pouted. We got changed on the back seat of the car every Wednesday night as my mam drove us from school [...]

Fiction | Exposition by Nathalie Léger tr. Amanda DeMarco

She enters. She is roused by anger and reproach. She bursts onto the right of the image as if it were a backdrop masked with curtains. One hand clutches a knife against her waist, which gleams obliquely across her belly. Her face is cold, her mouth thin, lips tight, eyebrows knit, her gaze is clear and hard, her hair is slicked into two little severely parted plaits. The knife, whose handle disappears into her balled fist, vibrates at the very center, nearly absent from it [...]

Interview with Caleb Femi – Young People’s Laureate for London

Caleb Femi, a 26 year old teacher and poet from Peckham, has been chosen to be the new Young People's Laureate for London. Femi...

Short Story Competition 2016

This competition is now closed. Thanks to all who entered. The longlist, shortlist and winners will be announced over the next few months. Keep checking our...

Fiction | “Smack” from Salt Slow by Julia Armfield

The following text is an extract from the story “Smack”, taken from Julia Armfield’s debut collection Salt Slow, published by Picador: 'The jellyfish come with the morning – a great beaching, bodies black on sand. The ocean empties, a thousand dead and dying invertebrates, jungled tentacles and fine, fragile membranes blanketing the shore two miles in each direction. They are translucent, almost spectral, as though the sea has exorcised its ghosts [...]'

Fiction | Night As It Falls by Jakuta Alikavazovic

Paul couldn’t believe that she lived in a hotel. Better yet, or worse, he had known it, then forgotten. They talked about her on campus, rumours had preceded her, so much that her body already existed in whispers, but Paul didn’t care about gossip. He cared about girls, and women. Their mouths, their flesh. He was eighteen years old, and living multiple lives. By day he went to university, he stared at huge blackboards or whiteboards, he traded and compared notes with [...]

Interview | 2018 Short Story Prize Judges!

With only a few weeks remaining for our Short Story Prize for this year, we thought we would catch up with our judges to...

Short Story Competition: A word from the Judges

With just a few weeks left till the end of our annual Short Story Competition we spoke to the Judges to find out exactly what the short...

Faber New Poets: in conversation

Faber New Poets . Photograph © Thea Hawlin The Faber New Poets scheme, now in its fourth incarnation, provides a platform for new voices and...

Essay | Dostoevsky and Poor Folk by Patrick Maxwell

Wilfred Owen captured the national spirit best when he talked of the ‘drawing-down of blinds’, surely the most succinct depiction of English melancholia. The English spirit – distinct from of Britishness, though also a part of it – is one of deep decline under the shadow of former empire. It is the spirit of T. S. Eliot’s line ‘winter’s afternoon | In a secluded chapel’ in ‘Little Gidding’; of the quiet introit sung by an evensong choir, backing away into the cathedrals’ dingy corners [...]

Review | Old Food by Ed Atkins & Dark Satellites by...

Want to feel young? Fitzcarraldo Editions – whose small roster of authors includes two of the last five Nobel laureates for literature – is less than five years old. Its first book, Matthias Enard’s Zone, was published in August of 2015, which makes the independent publishing house exactly three months younger than Mad Max: Fury Road [...]

Essay | The Meaning of La Grande Jatte by Jeffrey Meyers

Georges Seurat (l859-91) was a mysterious and elusive personality. Reserved in character and manner, extremely reticent about his private affairs, he kept no diaries and his rare letters were factual and impersonal. Born in Paris, the son of a retired court bailiff, he learned what he called the routine and dead practices of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, did his military service in Brest, painted in Paris and, in summers, on the Normandy coast. Like Caravaggio, Watteau, Van Gogh, Lautrec and Modigliani, he died in his thirties [...]

Interview | Sam Riviere on Martial, authenticity and stealing

"I discovered Martial’s poetry by searching for the number 104 for an unrelated reason, which was recorded on Wikipedia as being the year he probably died. I trust this kind of chance occurrence, and it led me to reading some of the epigrams, which I imagine I had vaguely heard of before. I responded immediately to their playfulness, sarcasm, brevity, devotion to social commentary, and general refusal of seriousness – especially things like Martial’s own admission that his poems aren’t even that good, a lot of the time." [...]

Interview | Sinéad Gleeson on Solidarity in Sickness, Isolation and Empathy

Jack Solloway Sinéad Gleeson on Solidarity in Sickness, Isolation and Empathy   With the UK government currently advising ‘social distancing’ and the country expecting further preventative...

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Book and Kitchen: An Evening of Drinks and Poetry

On 28th February, The London Magazine hosted an evening of drinks and poetry at Book and Kitchen, Notting Hill. There were readings from several of...

Dearest reader! Our newsletter!

Sign up to our newsletter for the latest content, freebies, news and competition updates, right to your inbox. From the oldest literary periodical in the UK.

You can unsubscribe any time by clicking the link in the footer of any email you receive from us, or directly on info@thelondonmagazine.org. Find our privacy policies and terms of use at the bottom of our website.