Fiction | Night As It Falls by Jakuta Alikavazovic

Paul couldn’t believe that she lived in a hotel. Better yet, or worse, he had known it, then forgotten. They talked about her on campus, rumours had preceded her, so much that her body already existed in whispers, but Paul didn’t care about gossip. He cared about girls, and women. Their mouths, their flesh. He was eighteen years old, and living multiple lives. By day he went to university, he stared at huge blackboards or whiteboards, he traded and compared notes with [...]

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2016 | Judges

The London Magazine's annual Poetry Prize seeks out new writers whose work is adventurous, innovative and surprising in both form and content. We are very...

Spotlight II: Dostoyevsky Wannabe

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers...

Interview | Jonathan Simons on Analog Sea, Neo-Romanticism and ‘The Contemplative...

'The discomfort of boredom is never something human beings have liked, but reality and nature and the lack of technology, and the rudimentary qualities of technology, pushed back on us. The friction that we want to eradicate is defined by boredom and old age and sickness and death, and we need these things to be human, and we need these things to have interesting, vital arts and letters as well.'

Interview | 2018 Short Story Prize Judges!

With only a few weeks remaining for our Short Story Prize for this year, we thought we would catch up with our judges to...

The Easter Rising by Frank Armstrong

The one hundredth anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising will hardly register in most London Magazine readers’ minds, but for Irish people the anniversary...

This Dark Art by Neil Burns

This Dark Art If you can look into the seeds of time, And say which grain will grow, and which will not. Speak. - Macbeth, Act 1...

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2016 | Winners

Thank you so much to everyone who entered The London Magazine's Poetry Prize 2016. The standard of entries was extremely high but our judges,...

Interview | ‘The party that never stops’: Sarah Lucas on The...

I was with Damien Hirst and Angus Fairhurst (I imagine) and we popped in. It was dingy, green and crowded. Also smoky. Ian Board was behind the bar insulting people and swearing as they came in. I thought he was horrible. Someone said, ‘He’s alright when you get to know him.’ I thought, I’ll bear that in mind. I didn’t go back for a long while. By that time Ian was dead. He was still there in the form of his sculpted head which contained his ashes. Michael Wojas said that you can roll a pinch up [...]

An interview with Ben Ehrenreich

Just south of the village, Nabi Saleh, there is a spring. It is called Ein al Qoos or the Bow Spring. Palestinian farmers have...

Interview | Sinéad Gleeson on Solidarity in Sickness, Isolation and Empathy

Jack Solloway Sinéad Gleeson on Solidarity in Sickness, Isolation and Empathy   With the UK government currently advising ‘social distancing’ and the country expecting further preventative...

Short Story Competition 2017

UPDATE: EXTENDED CLOSING DATE  The competition will now be open for entries until November 15th. Autumn is just around the corner, which means The London Magazine‘s...

Essay | The Meaning of La Grande Jatte by Jeffrey Meyers

Georges Seurat (l859-91) was a mysterious and elusive personality. Reserved in character and manner, extremely reticent about his private affairs, he kept no diaries and his rare letters were factual and impersonal. Born in Paris, the son of a retired court bailiff, he learned what he called the routine and dead practices of the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, did his military service in Brest, painted in Paris and, in summers, on the Normandy coast. Like Caravaggio, Watteau, Van Gogh, Lautrec and Modigliani, he died in his thirties [...]

Bram Bogart at the Saatchi Gallery

SALON, Saatchi Gallery’s commercial exhibition space, launched earlier this year with a fascinating show by the post-war Japanese artist, Tsuyoshi Maekawa, and in keeping...

Interview | Joe Dunthorne on Cliché, Adulting and Coming of Age

What do we even want from coming of age? Do we want to be wise, mature people, or do we just care about ticking off a list of pre-agreed markers: homeowning, or a long-term relationship, or whatever it is? Ultimately, you can be a child, you can be the most immature and undeveloped human, and have achieved all those things. So obviously it’s a problematic term. Obviously, Catcher in the Rye is the ultimate touchstone for literary coming-of-age for most people [...]

Björk Digital at Somerset House

Over her three-decade long career, Icelandic artist Björk has always blurred limits; genre limits between experimental and pop music, verbal limits between language and...

Review | Old Food by Ed Atkins & Dark Satellites by...

Want to feel young? Fitzcarraldo Editions – whose small roster of authors includes two of the last five Nobel laureates for literature – is less than five years old. Its first book, Matthias Enard’s Zone, was published in August of 2015, which makes the independent publishing house exactly three months younger than Mad Max: Fury Road [...]

Short Story Competition 2016

This competition is now closed. Thanks to all who entered. The longlist, shortlist and winners will be announced over the next few months. Keep checking our...

Interview | Chris McCabe: Poems from the Edge of Extinction

Chris McCabe is the National Poetry Librarian. In 2013 he was shortlisted for the Ted Hughes Award and his works include numerous poetry collections, including Speculatrix (2014) and The Triumph of Cancer (2018). His new poetry anthology Poems from the Edge of Extinction, published by Chambers this year, collects poems from endangered languages [...]

Essay Competition 2017

This competition is now closed. As the oldest literary and arts review in the UK, The London Magazine has a long history of publishing great essayists;...

Interview | Emma Donoghue on writing hunger

Set in Ireland in 1858, seven years after the potato famine, The Wonder tells the story of an English nurse who is hired to spend two weeks observing an eleven-year old girl, who, her parents claim, has not eaten for months. Based on the almost fifty cases of ‘fasting girls’ - of women who claimed to be surviving without food for months on end in Europe and North America between the sixteenth and twentieth centuries - Donoghue’s novel anticipates the invention of anorexia [...]

Fiction | The Swallowed Man by Edward Carey

I am writing this account, in another man’s book, by candlelight, inside the belly of a fish. I have been eaten. I have been eaten, yet I am living still. I have tried to get out. I have made many attempts. But I must conclude that it is not possible. I am trapped within an enormous creature and am slowly being digested. I have found a strange place to exist, a cave between life and death. It is an unhappy miracle. I am afraid  of  the  dark. The dark is coming for me [...]

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2016 | An Update

This competition is now closed. Thank you so much to all entrants. The longlist, shortlist and winners will be announced over the next few months. Keep...

Book and Kitchen: An Evening of Drinks and Poetry

On 28th February, The London Magazine hosted an evening of drinks and poetry at Book and Kitchen, Notting Hill. There were readings from several of...

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