Review | Old Food by Ed Atkins & Dark Satellites by...

Want to feel young? Fitzcarraldo Editions – whose small roster of authors includes two of the last five Nobel laureates for literature – is less than five years old. Its first book, Matthias Enard’s Zone, was published in August of 2015, which makes the independent publishing house exactly three months younger than Mad Max: Fury Road [...]

Fiction | Exposition by Nathalie Léger tr. Amanda DeMarco

She enters. She is roused by anger and reproach. She bursts onto the right of the image as if it were a backdrop masked with curtains. One hand clutches a knife against her waist, which gleams obliquely across her belly. Her face is cold, her mouth thin, lips tight, eyebrows knit, her gaze is clear and hard, her hair is slicked into two little severely parted plaits. The knife, whose handle disappears into her balled fist, vibrates at the very center, nearly absent from it [...]

Fiction | “Smack” from Salt Slow by Julia Armfield

The following text is an extract from the story “Smack”, taken from Julia Armfield’s debut collection Salt Slow, published by Picador: 'The jellyfish come with the morning – a great beaching, bodies black on sand. The ocean empties, a thousand dead and dying invertebrates, jungled tentacles and fine, fragile membranes blanketing the shore two miles in each direction. They are translucent, almost spectral, as though the sea has exorcised its ghosts [...]'

News | Caoilinn Hughes, on winning the Collyer Bristow Prize 2019

Caoilinn HughesOn winning the Collyer Bristow PrizeFirst thanks go to my peers—Sophie Mackintosh, Danny Denton, Samuel Fisher and Katherine Kilalea—for writing such good books...

An interview with Bernard O’Donoghue

Bernard O’Donoghue was born in 1945 in Cullen, Co Cork. His latest collection, The Seasons of Cullen Church, returns with a compelling and simple...

Falling Awake by Alice Oswald

'The whole challenge of poetry', Alice Oswald once wrote, 'is to keep language open, so that what we don't yet know can pass through...

Pearl by Simon Armitage

Simon Armitage’s new translation of the fourteenth-century poem Pearl follows his energetic 2008 translation of the same anonymous poet’s Sir Gawain and the Green...

Through by David Herd

David Herd begins his new collection Through with the line:------It is possible to be precise.The wording-- “it is possible”-- is telling. Not promised, not...

Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler

The latest novelistic offering in Hogarth Shakespeare’s project to refashion the bard’s tales into contemporary retellings, Vinegar Girl compellingly revitalises one of Shakespeare’s most...

No Map Could Show Them by Helen Mort

No Map Could Show Them, Mort’s second collection, explores the narratives of Victorian and modern women –mountaineers, campaigners, runners – and considers, more broadly,...

Five Rivers Met on a Wooded Plain by Barney Norris

What is ‘home’? A person? A place? A feeling of belonging?These are the questions that run through Barney Norris’s debut novel like a finely...

The Vegetarian by Han Kang

The outer layer of your skin, the epidermis, replaces itself every 35 days. Become a vegetarian, better yet a vegan, and soon enough your...

Hot Milk by Deborah Levy

What do we think of when we think of myths? For children, myths are something unquestionable and magical. They present a world removed from...

Measures of Expatriation by Vahni Capildeo

Vahni Capildeo said in a 2012 interview with Zannab Sheikh that ‘poetry is a form of concentration’. Her latest collection, Measures of Expatriation, puts...

The Blade Artist by Irvine Welsh

The opening pages of The Blade Artist read like the antithetical yoking of a delicate and diaphanous Stephen Daedalus-like epiphany and a sinister crime...

Aeneid Book VI by Seamus Heaney

Faber’s publication of Heaney’s translation of Book VI of the Aeneid pays testament to the enduring poetic prowess of its translator. His posthumous connection...

Mothering Sunday By Graham Swift

… And could she disentangle it, the stuff she’d seen in her mind’s eye, from the actual stuff of her own life?In 1935, fleeing...

What is Not Yours is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi

In a museful snippet-cum-travelogue published by Lenny Letter earlier this month, Helen Oyeyemi detailed the auto-didacticism that characterized her first visit to Prague, where...

Dog Run Moon by Callan Wink

Callan Wink’s debut collection of stories stands as a promising start to a fine literary career. Some of the stories included here have deservedly...

The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel

The High Mountains of Portugal is not a traditional novel but instead a set of three interconnected tales that take place over the course...

The Catch by Fiona Sampson

The cover image of Fiona Sampson’s seventh collection is bright and strange. Taken from photographer Charles Frèger’s Wilder Mann series (2010-11), it depicts a...

Gold Fame Citrus by Claire Vaye Watkins

The American West has always been home to grifters and thieves, dreamers and doers. It has been a destination for the misfits, for the...

Shylock is My Name by Howard Jacobson

To mark the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, Hogarth Shakespeare has commissioned a series of novels from high-profile authors. The series was inaugurated by...

Human Acts by Han Kang

Buried in the middle of Han Kang's Human Acts is a play that, like Kang's book, dramatises the democratic uprisings in Gwangju, South Korea,...

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