Fiction | Faint-Hearted Z by Viken Berberian

Viken BerberianFaint-Hearted Z  We are known to grumble, but no one expected war to break out. At our annual language conference, which took place on...

Essay | ‘Force, hatred, history’: James Joyce’s Ulysses at 100 by...

Daniel Mulhall‘Force, hatred, history’: James Joyce’s Ulysses at 100  James Joyce’s Ulysses was published in Paris on 2 February 1922, its author’s fortieth birthday. An...

Poetry | Turkish Delight by Isabelle Baafi

Isabelle Baafi Turkish Delight   i know .........everything .........how blood finds its way......... in the dark ........why earth spins .........but never gets dizzy .........which grown-ups are safe .............to smile...

Poetry | Care for me like you would a leg injury...

Safiya Kamaria KinshasaCare for me like you would a leg injury  i would like for my presence to be a reminder you are not as young...

Poetry | The Bond by André Naffis-Sahely

André Naffis-SahelyThe Bond The dry August air reeks of wood and ash and the smoke plumes leaving the rocky bowl of the San Gabriels sink to kiss the...

Fiction | The Crying Suite by David Hering

David Hering The Crying Suite Lachrynoma: cancer of the tears. I was sent down to a stone building behind the hospital, where the man at the...

Review | Arab Music Days in Berlin, an Omphalos of Being...

ReviewArab Music Days in Berlin, an Omphalos of Being at the Pierre Boulez Sal The chill sky above Berlin was heavy as granite. The rumour...

In Memoriam: Grey Gowrie

The London Magazine is delighted to launch the Grey Gowrie Poetry Prize 2021/2. The prize, named in the memory and honour of our esteemed...

Fiction | How Are Things With You? by William Bedford

William BedfordHow Are Things With You?It was three in the morning when they left the club. Blossom Dearie had finished her second set with...

Fiction | Asphyxia by Violette Leduc

My mother never gave me her hand… She always helped me on and off pavements by pinching my frock or coat very lightly at the spot where the armhole provides a grip. It humiliated me. I felt I was inside the body of an old horse with my carter dragging me along by one ear… One afternoon, as a gleaming carriage sped past, splattering the leaden summer with its reflections, I pushed the hand away right in the middle of the road. She pinched the cloth [...]

Essay | Reflections on Orwell’s Coming Up for Air by Patrick...

"Call it peace, if you like. But when I say peace I don’t mean absence of war, I mean peace, a feeling in your guts. And it’s gone for ever if the rubber-truncheon boys get hold of us." What moves us about this passage? It is not particularly difficult to know which literary world we are in, which part of history we are being exposed to, and even which author is speaking [...]

Review | Young Rembrandt & Nicolaes Maes: Dutch Master of...

The similarities between the life paths of the 17th century Dutch painters Nicolaes Maes (1634-1693) and Rembrandt (1606-1669) are intriguing. Both grew up in small town Holland, both were apprenticed to local painters at an early age, both moved to Amsterdam to work with a master, both returned to their home towns to perfect their own style, both ended their lives in Amsterdam to which each had returned as their careers began to burgeon [...]

Interview | Elizabeth Eade at HIX ART

HIX ART is currently presenting I know you are but what am I, the first major solo exhibition by acclaimed British artist Elizabeth Eade. In this new series of installations, Eade playfully and powerfully continues her exploration of a range of social and political issues. In 2018, Eade won the celebrated HIX Award, judged by the likes of Tracey Emin and Gavin Turk, with her piece Die Liste — a ten-metre-long handwritten list documenting the deaths [...]

Interview | Atiq Rahimi on dreams, minimalism and the female nude

'Depicting the body is a very political act in my culture, no matter what you do with it; even if it’s abstract. Nudity is a political act. Unveiling the body is engaging with the essential in life, the universal. The body is fundamentally the same regardless of gender. Some political regimes divide the genders along the lines of insignificant bodily differences. Politics often create a contradiction between the sexes when, in actual fact, it’s just a difference, nothing else.' [...]

Interview | Joo Yeon Park on Beckett, Failure and ‘the Unword’

'If you are to fail, you might as well, as Beckett put it, 'fail better'; you might as well volunteer to fail. And failure is, possibly, a necessity in art-making, and it's not necessarily a negative thing in art. It can prove to be a turning-point, to open up a space for discussion, for something that you haven’t expected to see or experience. So it can be a positive thing, so I think there's a double-edged sword in what Beckett means by failure.' […]

Review | Bridget Riley: The Eye’s Mind

Bridget Riley didn’t invent Op Art. The phrase first appeared in Time Magazine in 1964 in response to Julian Stanczak’s exhibition Optical Paintings. Defined as a form that uses visual trickery to challenge perception, it was a natural successor to Futurism, Constructivism, Vorticism and even Dadaism, liberated by Impressionism. But Riley made it what it is now [...]

Essay | Reflections on The Brothers Karamazov by Patrick Maxwell

In his masterpiece, Enemies of Promise (1938), Cyril Connolly distinguishes between two different styles of writing, which he terms as the ‘Mandarin’ and the ‘Vernacular’. In the former group: Edward Gibbon, Virginia Woolf, and James Joyce; among the latter: William Hazlitt, George Orwell, and Christopher Isherwood. Fyodor Dostoevsky is a writer of neither groups [...]

Interview | Cecilia Brunson Projects Founder on I Am Awake by...

Eric BlockCecilia Brunson Projects Founder on I Am Awake by Feliciano CenturiónCecilia Brunson opened her eponymous Bermondsey-based gallery in 2015, providing a much needed European...

Review | Orient London – A sizzle above the rest

Steven O'BrienOrient London - A sizzle above the rest We were off to see the vast brocade of the Wallace Collection. However, lunchtime found us...

Poetry | Letter to Bez by Chris McCabe

Bez, post-Victorian Boz, Viz incarnate / and Viceroy of the sinew, what is the name / for light that detracts from the stars? / Urban pollutants de-lux distant galaxies / as we walk after / parties through school fields, / via car parks, past vacant vats & waste lots [...]

Essay | Come Back West, Magic Realism, We Need You Too

In 2016, Roisin O’Donnell published an article in The Irish Times which addressed the curious fact that so few Irish writers wrote in the magic realist mode. Putting in a plea for magic realism, she argued that “Ireland, with its healthy litany of bread-crusts-make-your-hair-go-curly superstitions, along with its hand-me-down myths [...]

Fiction | We Can Be Friends by Lauren Sarazen

There was a cluster of coats and hats careening over the railing, and when I got closer I could see what they were looking at. The basin, which had been full of water the last time I’d passed, was drained to the dregs and men in coveralls and tall rubber boots were crawling around in the sludge [...]

Essay | W.H. Auden: The Man Who Spoke for the Dumb...

One of the hallmarks of a great artist is their often lugubrious disdain for their own work. The reclusive French composer Paul Dukas was self-critical to the degree that he only allowed fifteen of his works to be published. Needless to say, they have become much loved [...]

Essay | Travel Writers as Citizens of Nowhere by Cecily Blench

At the Conservative Party Conference in 2016, shortly after the Brexit vote, the new Prime Minister Theresa May gave a speech in which she said these words: ‘If you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere’. She made this point while trying to address the concerns of those who voted for Brexit because of immigration [...]

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