Fiction | We Can Be Friends by Lauren Sarazen

There was a cluster of coats and hats careening over the railing, and when I got closer I could see what they were looking at. The basin, which had been full of water the last time I’d passed, was drained to the dregs and men in coveralls and tall rubber boots were crawling around in the sludge [...]

Essay | W.H. Auden: The Man Who Spoke for the Dumb...

One of the hallmarks of a great artist is their often lugubrious disdain for their own work. The reclusive French composer Paul Dukas was self-critical to the degree that he only allowed fifteen of his works to be published. Needless to say, they have become much loved [...]

Essay | Travel Writers as Citizens of Nowhere by Cecily Blench

At the Conservative Party Conference in 2016, shortly after the Brexit vote, the new Prime Minister Theresa May gave a speech in which she said these words: ‘If you are a citizen of the world, you are a citizen of nowhere’. She made this point while trying to address the concerns of those who voted for Brexit because of immigration [...]

Review | The Governesses by Anne Serre, tr. by Mark Hutchinson

In a large country house enclosed by a gold-gated garden, three young governesses are responsible for the education and general well-being of a group...

Review | WITCH by Rebecca Tamás

In her latest collection, WITCH, Rebecca Tamás explores the triumphs and oppression, the strengths and weaknesses, the power and the fears that generations of...

Extract | Twenty Theatres to See Before you Die by Amber...

Twenty Theatres to See Before You Die by Amber Massie-Blomfield is a love letter to Britain's theatres — a beautiful paean to the nation's...

Dido and Aeneas by Jeffrey Meyers

Autumn in Venice: Ernest Hemingway and His Last Muse, Andrea di Robilant, Atlantic Books, 348 pp. £17.99 (hardback). Andrea di Robilant has done extensive research, but...

Archive | Breakfast with Borges by Andrew Graham-Yooll

First published in The London Magazine March 1983, Vol.22, No.12 Jorge Luis Borges entered the Pedmonte Restaurant on Avenida de Mayo with the stiff steps of the...

Review | The Snowman at The Peacock Theatre

This Christmas, join the Birmingham Repertory Theatre in their magical rendition of Raymond Brigg’s The Snowman. Christmas would not be the same without this enchanting...

Review | Summer and Smoke at The Duke of York’s Theatre

A poetic vision of human nature and our existential struggle to forge the middle ground between body and soul. After writing his (in)famous A...

Essay | ‘Time to Murder and Create’: When Fiction Bleeds into...

If I were to open by describing my setting  as a desk piled high with old issues of The London Magazine, the wine red May 1960 issue face down on top, rust-brown rimmed teacup marking the narrow No Man’s Land between the pile and my laptop, you would assume I were telling the truth. If I were to add that the red reminded me of blood spilled last week in rage and the brown rimmed cup of the plughole down which that blood spiraled, you would assume I was either lying or mad.

Review | Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde at The...

The centrifugal drive behind much of the work featured in the Barbican’s new exhibition Modern Couples: Art, Intimacy and the Avant-garde is enunciated by Rodin in the first gallery: ‘I express in a loud voice what all artists think. Desire! Desire! What a formidable stimulant.’

Interview | Cradeaux Alexander

American video and performance artist Cradeaux Alexander presents a mid-career retrospective this month at Bow Arts, London. Jemima Walter met him to uncover how...

Archive | Memories of Modigliani by Anna Akhmatova

First published in the August 1964 edition of the London Magazine (Vol. 4 No.5) (translated from the Italian text by Bernard Wall) I can well believe...

Archive | Fiction | Silvio by Arturo Vivante

  First published in the June 1970 edition of The London Magazine (Vol. 10, No. 3) Like a statue too finely carved, too finished and perfected,...

Event Preview | Face Value by The Lot 5 Collective

CRAFT ISN’T A DIRTY WORD The art world has been divided since the beginning of the twentieth century. On the one side, the rejection of...

Archive | Poetry | Peter Bland

Peter Bland, the New Zealand writer and actor, has written extensively over his long career, and has been lauded with many accolades, among them...

Fiction | On His Own Ground by Vis Nathan

  First published in the December 1976/January 1977 of The London Magazine (Volume 16, No.5) Gopal entered his cubby-hole surrounded by huge racks bulging with musty...

Review | Promising Young Women by Caroline O’Donoghue

This year has truly brought to the fiction scene some of the most stunning and powerful female characters. From the extreme – such as My...

Confessions of an English Opium Eater: An Essay by David Punter

Before its controversial and ground-breaking publication as a book in 1822, Thomas De Quincey's autobiographical account of opiate addiction Confessions of an English Opium...

Charles Dibdin – Christmas Gambols

Charles Dibdin (1745-1814) has a strong claim to be Britain’s first pop star. He became famous as a performer in the 1760s, then went...

Interview | Karen Ashton, founder of the Vauxhall Art Car Boot...

  This Sunday, the Art Car Boot Fair Pulls Back In To Vauxhall Back to its roots in the heart of South London, this year’s Vauxhall...

The Threepenny Opera

If you put on a production of Romeo and Juliet in Verona, how much does anyone care that the action is ostensibly set in...

The Red and Yellow Nothing by Jay Bernard

It is difficult to put a finger on the immediate aftermath of reading The Red and Yellow Nothing: there is puzzlement, rage, and wonder,...

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