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Review | A Walk Through Essex Road IV at Tintype

  When walking the streets of London, its minor and major roads, its arteries and veins, begin to enmesh themselves with the walker’s brain. Over time they become an abstract map of the tendrils of frontal and parietal lobes, projected out over the landscape. Walking down main arterial roads, like Upper Street in Islington, is like traversing the well-trodden parts...

Julie Cope’s Naked Lunch

  ‘God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him.’ Said Nietzsche, so instead of looking to religion for comfort we laugh at videos of cats and endless cycles of memes. How then, do we create meaning from our lives in the absence of the grand narratives that religion once provided? In the works on display at Firstsite,...

Review | Flights by Olga Tokarczuk

  In just three years, Fitzcarraldo Editions have published remarkably intelligent books on everything from orientalism to football. Crucially, in our Trump/Brexit state of the world, they seem to have made it their mission to translate artists who are lauded in their home countries but aren’t that well-known elsewhere. Take Olga Tokarczuk: a Polish household name, author of eight novels and...

The Air Has Cleared

The air has cleared today, Over the city, and in my head, I see the trees breathe The invisible greenness of air, I feel the taste of sunlight On my hungry face, I don’t remember the day I was born, But I will remember this day, When the air cleared, After days of foggy thoughts, A bastard of a week, “Time is a fucking bastard” Wrote Carlos Fuentes, And he was right, not...

Review | Fahrelnissa Zeid at the Tate Modern

  ‘When I’m painting, I am always aware of a kind of communion with all living things, I mean with the universe as the sum total of the infinitely varied manifestations of being.’ - Fahrelnissa Zeid   Fahrelnissa Zeid, born in 1901 into the elite Ottoman family in Turkey, her life began as an eventful one as she was always surrounded by...

Review | Keith Vaughan: On Pagham Beach, Photographs and Collages from the 1930s

  It is hard for those brought up in a world of gender fluidity, with debates about who has the right to use which bathroom, to imagine the veil of secrecy and repression that prevailed during the first half of the 20th century around sexual encounters between men. The Sexual Offences Act that decriminalised homosexual acts in private between two...

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2017 | Winners

Thank you so much to everyone who entered The London Magazine‘s Poetry Prize 2017. The standard of entries was extremely high but our judges, Patricia McCarthy and Frieda Hughes, have made their choices and we are delighted to announce the winners: First place: ‘Old mother moor' by Sarah Westcott Second place: 'Aroi' by Roisin Kelly Third place: 'Panic' by Michael Henry Each of...

Review | David James at Gallery 46

  Gallery 46 is located in two renovated Georgian houses with their skirting, floorboards and sash windows still intact. Walking through the entrance hall and looking towards the original narrow staircase it’s clear that the gallery has retained the human scale of terrace living, which is in stark contrast to the inhuman minimalism and sterility of most gallery spaces. Such...

The Golden Eel

It had been twenty years since they last met. Thirty eight year old Eoghan O’Dullach was nervous inside; and in his brain he was running through past experiences of the, in the end, failed relationship. Those experiences which caused him emotional pain; and would they, him and her, be able to see with considerable hindsight how immature, emotionally, they...

Review | Melancholia – A Sebald Variation at Somerset House

  Descend the vertiginous spiral staircase to the Inigo Rooms of Somerset House in London between September 21st and December 10th 2017, and you will encounter ‘Melancholia – A Sebald Variation’, a fascinating exhibition in almost complete monochrome curated by writer and art historian John-Paul Stonard and the author Lara Fiegel. On entry you will be handed a little blue...

Review | Calder on Paper: 1960 – 1976 at the Saatchi Gallery

  SALON, Saatchi Gallery’s commercial exhibition space, launched earlier this year aiming to present the work of leading international artists who have had limited exposure in the UK. Its latest exhibition Calder on Paper: 1960 – 1976 is staged in collaboration with Mayfair’s Omer Tiroche Gallery and presents a large variety of Alexander Calder’s vibrant gouaches on paper. The white walls of the...

Extending the Range of Pejoratives: Howard Jacobson’s Pussy

  Written in “a fury of disbelief” during the weeks that followed the unlikely election of Donald Trump, Howard Jacobson’s latest novel Pussy dramatizes the education and rise to power of Prince Fracassus, heir to the Duchy of Origen, until he begins to preside over the Republic of Urbs-Ludus. The plotline is minimal but engrossing thanks to Jacobson’s spirited, arch tone...

Review | The Flesh To The Frame at Opera Gallery London

  David Kim Whittaker’s current exhibition THE FLESH TO THE FRAME reveals a powerful vortex of chaos and harmony. Presented in two parts In the Existence is currently on display in London and The Primal Vortex will follow later in the month in Paris. Within these displays more than forty oil and acrylic works, many of which are based around...

Review | The Essence of Things at 48 Albemarle Street

Arriving at 48 Albemarle Street you immediately enter a stripped-back environment; surrounded by exposed brick, wood and metal. This industrial interior makes a refreshing change from the usual polished white-cubes of Mayfair and lends itself to ArtCircle’s second exhibition THE ESSENCE OF THINGS which features work by a number of artists associated with minimalism and post-minimalism. Minimalism emerged as a...

Interview | Charlie Godet Thomas

Floating above your head a radiant yellow weather vane in the shape of a speech bubble, turning with the wind, dripping with rain. A changeable sign that moves with the times, pointing to nothing in particular. Laser-cut into its surface, the mocking call of a stereotypical slack-jawed yokel, “yo’ is stuck in thar fo’ever li'l gray cloud!!”. A piece...

Interview| Barry Miles, founder of the International Times

This week sees the opening of the exhibition The British Underground Press of the Sixties, at A22 Gallery, Clerkenwell, featuring the covers of every countercultural publication from the 1960s. The show is curated by Barry Miles and James Birch. Miles along with John ‘Hoppy’ Hopkins were the founders of International Times, the underground magazine that initiated the counterculture media...

Essay| Shetland Norn by Simon Tait

Shetland is a quiet, self-possessed nation of 22,000 whose population still considers itself to be more Norse than British. They like celebrations, foys they call them, but the big one comes on the last Tuesday of January, a midwinter relief when male Shetlanders dress up as Vikings, process through the capital, Lerwick – or Lerook in the vernacular -...

Review| The Letters Page Vol.2 published by Book Ex Machina

To pick up a book, writes Ioanna Mavrou, is ‘as if stepping out of the world for a beat and taking a much needed breath.’ Mavrou runs the independent publishers Book Ex Machina, responsible for the exquisite collection of epistolary reflections: The Letters Page Vol. 2. Edited by author Jon McGregor (If Nobody Speaks Of Remarkable Things), the volume...

Interview | Karen Ashton, founder of the Vauxhall Art Car Boot Sale

  This Sunday, the Art Car Boot Fair Pulls Back In To Vauxhall Back to its roots in the heart of South London, this year’s Vauxhall Art Car Boot Fair will pull up in Vauxhall on Sunday the 9th of July for an afternoon of art, bargains, fun and frivolity but this year with a brand new theme, ‘The Original.’ From...

Review | ArtCircle’s Focusing Space at 48 Albermarle Street

On entering the doorway of 48 Albemarle Street and walking up its makeshift staircase of simple wooden boards you are taken into a world that couldn’t be more apart from the fleshpots of Mayfair. A neon sign bearing the letters ‘AC’ guides a visitor upward, with dusty exposed brick walls on either side making them question if they are...

The Root of it All by Charlotte Newman

  Pavements slick from rain and a market at night, risen dripping from the oily roads like a brand new continent. Brunch alongside nails alongside jerk fish alongside brooms, alongside bright, bright Iro skirts and sweet and sour £2 and Dark & Stormys £8 and hair removal calls to Russia kale juiced with yogurt is better rubber soles plastic spoons...

Castles in the Air | Stephen Chambers : The Court of Redonda

Princes, prefects, urchins and poets; these are just a few in a court of luminaries setting sail to Venice. But all is not as it seems, for this royal court is not to be found on the passenger list - all are actually cargo, nestled safely below deck. From May to November, The Court of Redonda, a solo exhibition...

Essay | Marion Coutts: ‘Aiming or Hitting’ by Annie Carpenter

These are busy times for the writer and artist Marion Coutts. Her first novel, The Iceberg, which was published in 2014, has proved a runaway success. It was longlisted for the Guardian First Book Award, shortlisted for the Costa Biography Award and won the Wellcome Book Prize. And this month Coutts is exhibiting at Tintype gallery in Islington, her...

Review | Louder Than Hearts by Zeina Hashem Beck

‘Louder than Hearts has it all’, writes Betsy Sholl, judge of the 2016 May Sarton New Hampshire Poetry Prize, ‘compelling language and a sense of moral gravitas the ability to address a larger world with passion and artfulness’. High praise, though not at all mistaken in describing Lebanese poet Zeina Hashem Beck’s second collection, which brings together new...

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