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News | Short Story Prize 2022: Sarah Moore Fitzgerald wins first place for her story ‘Matamoros, July 1846’

The London Magazine Short Story Prize 2022 awards first place to Sarah Moore Fitzgerald, after her short story 'Matamoros, July 1846’ impressed our panel of judges during this year’s competition. The response this year was overwhelming, and we would like to thank everyone who entered the competition. Submissions were read anonymously by our panel of judges, David Hayden (Darker With...

Fiction | Homesick by Jennifer Croft [EXTRACT]

Jennifer CroftHomesick The following text is reproduced with permission from International Booker-winning translator Jennifer Croft‘s second novel Homesick, first published in the USA to critical acclaim in 2019. It was named winner of the 2020 William Saroyan International Prize for writing, and a Best Book of the Year by BuzzFeed and Times Literary Supplement. It is published for the first time in the...

Interview | Harry Skeggs

Interview | Harry SkeggsBritish fine art photographer Harry Skeggs is currently presenting his latest work at Clarendon Gallery, Mayfair. Beyond documents expeditions Skeggs has made in the last year to the Antarctic peninsula, South Georgia and the Falklands, as well as to Alaska. On these expeditions, Skeggs captured images which embrace the spontaneity of the animals which inhabit these...

Interview |Lara Feigel on Look! We Have Come Through! : Living With D.H. Lawrence

 Lara Feigel on Look! We Have Come Through! : Living With D.H. Lawrence We spoke on the phone to academic and writer Lara Feigel about her new book, Look! We Have Come Through! Living With D.H. Lawrence, out now with Bloomsbury.  You began writing the book during the pandemic. How did this isolation impact your writing?  I knew at the start of 2020...

Interview | Psychogeography and Delivery Riding: Max Wilkinson on his new play ‘Rainer’

Max Wilkinson Psychogeography and Delivery RidingMax Wilkinson on his new play Rainer Rainer is playing at the Arcola Theatre's New Outside Space from the 1-18th of June, 2022 Max Wilkinson, a playwright from London, has always been fascinated by cities. Growing up in London, he spent most of his twenties cycling or walking across it between jobs to save on bus-fare, developing...

The London Magazine Short Story Prize 2022

Submissions are closed for The London Magazine's Short Story Prize 2022.  The London Magazine has published short stories by some of the most well-respected literary figures over the course of its long history, from Jean Rhys to Raymond Carver and V.S. Pritchett. Our annual Short Story Competition seeks out new voices to join them. Established to encourage emerging literary talent, the...

Review | Arab Music Days in Berlin, an Omphalos of Being at the Pierre Boulez Saal

ReviewArab Music Days in Berlin, an Omphalos of Being at the Pierre Boulez Sal The chill sky above Berlin was heavy as granite. The rumour of war was everywhere, and it loped alongside me as I entered the Pierre Boulez Saal. I was there to see the performance of the Tunisian Gharbi Trio and the time spent there was a...

Fiction | I, Nerd by Max Sydney Smith

Max Sydney SmithI, Nerd The following text is excerpted from I, Nerd by Max Sydney Smith, the latest in Open Pen's series of novelettes. I, Nerd follows Robin, an enthusiastic yet unsuccessful player of tabletop games, who, when his local club announces its imminent closure, bands together with friends to enter the National Masters Tournament, and so immortalise the club name...

Essay | Waterbaby by Rachel Spence

Rachel SpenceWaterbaby After my mother died, I started to swim in the river Teme. Down by the weir at Dinham Mill, sometimes alone, sometimes with M waiting for me on the bank. Usually I went early in the morning with just fishermen, dog walkers and a handful of women for company. At that hour the river a convent. A place...

Review | Too Much Too Young: Jolyon Fenwick at Shapero Rare Books

ReviewToo Much Too Young: Jolyon Fenwick at Shapero Rare Books Taking centre stage at Jolyon Fenwick’s latest solo exhibition at Shapero Rare Books on Bond Street is a new piece by Fenwick. Titled The Good Versus Evil Table Football Elevens Wait to be Presented to Her Majesty (2021), it is Fenwick’s tribute to the Queen’s fortitude in attending nearly every event,...

Poetry | Leonie Rushforth | Two poems from Deltas

Leonie RushforthAn Irishman flies in from New York to see Krapp’s Last Tape and falls asleep on someone’s shoulder Up in the steep dark, body heat gathers, the breathing comes less easily. The wait, longer than it should be, is long enough for a few relentless turns of the spool into what was almost silence, so that that stranger’s lolling head...

Fiction | Dispatches by Philip Womack

Philip WomackDispatches The Peters and Taft offices were double-height. The glass windows, which had no apparent joins, gave a view across a narrow street directly into the office blocks opposite. Overhead lights, breaking up the gathering night, revealed abandoned workstations. Black-clad figures emptied wastebaskets or pushed the nozzles of vacuum cleaners across carpets. .........It was 8pm, or thereabouts, on Friday night....

Poetry | Michelle Penn | Retablo for blast glass

Michelle PennRetablo for blast glass Sentimentality is a sign of self- abnegation, he tells me and I think of trinitite: sand drawn into the fiery helmet of the burn, then raining back to earth, batter my heart and all that shit. Pale green blistered and bubbled through, clicking the sensors toward hysteria. Don’t get sentimental. It’s all fallout. Make of me a fire eater. Let me taste the flame,...

Fiction | Giant by Jacob Parker

Jacob ParkerGiant  When he debuted America in 1996 the scales finally tipped at 679 pounds. ...........49 stone. ...........We needed a giant, the promoter said. 6 feet 11 inches. Giant Haystacks. Renamed ‘Loch Ness’ for WWF. ...........Snarling. Snaggle-toothed. Lumbering penguin-footed. From behind he looked like an old man. ...........Saw off Jim Duggen though – ‘I’ll challenge any wrestler in the world.’ ...........Had his eyes on Hogan too –...

Fiction | Engaged therein by Declan O’Driscoll

Declan O'DriscollEngaged therein Every Station master, Inspector, Engine-driver, Fireman, Guard, Signalman, Policeman, Ganger, Foreman, Shunter, Yardman, and Gateman, and also every Clerk and Porter, connected with the working of the Railway, must be supplied with, and have with him when on duty, and produce when required, a copy of these Rules and Regulations, the current Working Time Table book, or...

News | Poetry Prize 2021/22: Jay Gao wins first place for his poem ‘Sky Soldier’

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2021/22 awards first place to Jay Gao, for his poem ‘Sky Soldier’, as part of its annual competition. Congratulations also go to the second and third prize winners Isabelle Baafi and Safiya Kinshasa. Submissions were read anonymously by the panel of judges, Ian Duhig, Mona Arshi and Anthony Anaxagorou. Thank you to everyone who took...

News | Cal Flyn announced winner of 2021 Sunday Times Charlotte Aitken Trust Young Writer of the Year Award

NewsCal Flyn announced winner of 2021 Sunday Times Charlotte Aitken Trust Young Writer of the Year Award Scottish author and journalist Cal Flyn was last night announced winner of the 2021 Sunday Times Charlotte Aitken Trust Young Writer of the Year Award for her 'exceptional' account of ecological diversity, Islands of Abandonment (William Collins). The announcement was made by The Sunday...

Extract | The Fragments of my Father by Sam Mills

Sam MillsThe Fragments of my Father The following is text is reproduced with permission from The Fragments of my Father: A memoir of madness, love and being a carer by Sam Mills, a remarkable work of non-fiction that blends memoir and literary biography, in which Mills explores the experience of becoming the primary carer for her father. The Fragments of...

Review | Upping the Ante by David Malcolm

David MalcolmUpping the Ante Crown of Beaks, Erik Martiny, River Boat Books, 2020 Sometimes I think that if there is a spectre haunting Europe, it is crime fiction. I have carried out empirical field research. In bookshops from Gdańsk to Salzburg, from Preston to Berlin – there’s just so much of it. In the old days in Gibert Joseph on the...

Fiction | Virtual Self by Lydia Rachel Figes

Lydia Rachel FigesVirtual Self I'm always here. While you are asleep, the world I inhabit continues to revolve. Constantly refreshing like a never ending digital carousel. Why resist my electric impact? I'm omnipresent; I'll still be here tomorrow. My creation was inevitable, but my relationship with you, my subject, is far more complex. We know each other intimately. I'm wired into your...

Poetry | Tamsin Hopkins | Grandfathers in Helium | Blue Ladder

Tamsin HopkinsGrandfathers in Helium It’s Spring. I decide to write a sad play called Grandfathers in Helium, about all four of my grandfathers. Because relatives tie you down.Because give them an eighth of a chance and they’ll define you – wellsprings of guilt not content as the source of nose, eyes, chin,roots to your buds and leaves. They are like last year’s fireworks,...

Essay | Audrey Magee | Does Interior Monologue have a National Identity?

Audrey MageeDoes Interior Monologue have a National Identity? A new essay by Audrey Magee, author of The Undertaking, and The Colony. How do we talk? How do we talk to each other and how do we talk to ourselves? What is said in the space around our talk? In the gestures that accompany that talk? And what are those influences on that...

Interview | Jaime Gili and Loop

Cecilia Brunson Projects presents the upcoming solo exhibition, Loop, by renowned Venezuelan artist Jaime Gili. The exhibition explores the eternally spiralling ideas that connect Gili’s artistic, family and national history. We met up with Jaime to tell us more. Could you explain a little bit about what was happening culturally in Venezuela during 1968? What was it that drew you...

Poetry | Three Poems by Tania Ganitsky (trans. Rosalind Harvey)

Tania Ganitsky (trans. Rosalind Harvey)Three Poems The first poem of the year tells of what I will touch: the unbudded leaves of the begonia, someone’s body as they dream, in a distant body, of images that to date they have not seen and which to date do not exist; the wet tongue of a dog that will wake me in the mornings, the blistering logs I...

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