Home Authors Posts by Robert Greer

Robert Greer

187 POSTS 0 COMMENTS

Review | Whip-Hot & Grippy by Heather Phillipson

Whip-Hot & Grippy begins with a hyphen and ends with a personal statement, with the intervening 126 pages featuring advertising-speak, sex scenes, terrorism, broadcast media, consumption-anxiety, protest, and human-animal relations. Ian Macmillan described Phillipson’s debut Instant Flex 718 as a ’bucket of water in the face’, and Whip-Hot & Grippy — with its psychedelic cover of a cat ambiguously...

Review | Skylon Deeply Savoury on the South Bank

I hardly ever go across the river to the south side. I cannot stand the man-boys ruckling along on their skateboards. Yet go we did, over the footbridge just outside Embankment tube station, on a dull Friday morning. The skaters were not getting any younger and the hipsters still show no sign of giving up their promenade. We were off...

Extract | The Leaflets by Ferdous Sadat

The following poem is taken from the anthology Tales of Two Londons: Stories from a Fractured City, ed. Claire Armitstead, Arcadia Books, London, 2019. Ferdous Sadat The Leaflets I am carrying a big bag full of leaflets for a Pakistani restaurant called Lahori There are so many of them, maybe 600 and every one I have to put through a letter box One huge...

Review | My Enemy’s Cherry Tree by Wang Ting-Kuo

We don’t have to start if you’re not ready.'The epigraph on the first page of Wang Ting-Huo’s award-winning novel invites pause. It may seem like an odd introduction, but Wang Ting-Huo's career has in some ways defined by a sense of pause; after writing to acclaim through his twenties, he was, upon marrying, told by his father that he...

Fiction | Jane Campbell — Schopenhauer and I

Robots could help solve social care crisis, say academics In the UK alone, 15,000 people are over 100 years of age and this figure will only increase. The robots will offer support with everyday tasks, like taking tablets, as well as offering companionship. — BBC News, 30th January 2017

Review | Mnemic Symbols by Andrew Hodgson

It’s a familiar, yet uncanny feeling we all know; like waking up in a hotel you’re sure you’ve never stayed in before, and yet, there is something recognisable and common to its aesthetic—the slight metallic sensation to the touch of the sheets; the tilt of the crimson bed side lamp. Not quite a streamlined déjà vu, but a sense...

Essay | Heaney At Home by Simon Tait

Simon Tait Heaney At Home Seamus Heaney’s brother Hugh sums him up better than anyone. “Seamus’s feet never left the ground”, he says, “and you could nearly say he never left Bellaghy”. He did leave and since the mid-1970s had lived in Dublin, but he was such a frequent visitor it’s as if he was never away. His large family – he...

Review | We’ll Never Have Paris ed. Andrew Gallix

We'll Never Have Paris, ed. Andrew Gallix, Repeater Books, May 2019
“The failure of the English revolution… is all around us: in the Westminster constitution, in Ireland, and poisoning English attitudes to Europe”. — London, Patrick Keiller, 1994 There is a scene from Julien Temple's 1980 mockumentary of The Sex Pistols The Great Rock 'n' Roll Swindle, where Sid Vicious, recently dead bass player of the aforementioned group, walks through Paris from...

Review | Twenty Theatres to See Before You Die by Amber Massie-Blomfield

“You can take an empty space and call it a bare stage”, Amber Massie-Blomfield opens her book with this evocative statement and thus begins the journey she takes the reader on, inviting us to join her on her escapades to discover Britain’s “most astonishing and unexpected theatres”. As a theatre lover, I like to think of myself as well-travelled among...

Review | Billy Budd at Royal Opera House

For the first time in almost twenty years, Benjamin Britten’s Billy Budd returns home to the Royal Opera House in this co-production with Rome and Madrid, directed by Deobrah Warner and designed by Michael Levine. The story, based on the Herman Melville novel of the same name is about the HMS Indomitable, captained by Captain Vere (who in a prologue...

Interview | Kate Mosse: Secrets of Storytelling

Kate Mosse is a multi-million, number one bestselling author who writes historical fiction combined with crime, adventure, mystery, conflict and romance. She takes the reader back to France's wars of religion and shares the untold stories of women who could have lived many centuries ago. After the publication of the very popular Languedoc trilogy — and two Gothic thrillers...

Poetry | Trapeze by Layla Benitez-James

Layla Benitez-James Trapeze A rabbit might be taken away from a butcher by two different people and prepared separately; I mean, the structural integrity of my days has been compromised— one woman  may take my legs and heart; I mean, a man, -------------------------------------------------------------------who grew up on the cold North Sea might take my chest and head.  There was a time I swallowed a clove whole...

Saudi’s New Ministry of Culture a Surprise at the 58th Biennale

Steven O'Brien Saudi’s New Ministry of Culture a Surprise at the 58th Biennale It becomes harder for me to say anything new about Venice, even in the midst of the Biennale. As ever Venice remains an almost impossible confection; a city of palaces set on pearly water that should not exist, except in the imagination. Even amongst the glamour of the shining...

Review | Henry Moore: Influences and Influenced at Connaught Brown

Henry Moore has had an insurmountable influence on contemporary art. A new exhibition at Mayfair gallery Connaught Brown — Henry Moore: Influences and Influenced — sheds a light on the artist’s influences, and the artists who have subsequently drawn upon his approach for their own practice. With many of his works appearing in major galleries and auctions in recent...

Extract | Rosalind by Arifa Akbar

"Rosalind" by Arifa Akbar, extract taken from Tales of Two Londons: Stories from a Fractured City, ed. Claire Armitstead, Arcadia Books, London, 2019. Copyright © Arifa Akbar, 2018. Reproduced by permission of Arcadia Books. For more information on, and to purchase this book, visit Arcadia Books. Arifa Akbar Rosalind I heard about Rosalind Hibbins before I met her. I was buying an attic...

Extract | Mnemic Symbols by Andrew Hodgson

  The following is an extract from Andrew Hodgson's novel Mnemic Symbols (Dostoyevsky Wannabe, 2019). For more information, visit Dostoyevsky Wannabe. Andrew Hodgson Mnemic Symbols Two, ‘As I’ve told you before – ,’ “I’ve never met you before…”  ‘ – as I’ve told you before, it’s not a vase, it’s a…’ but the bus stop was empty, or empty abouts as I took the...

Fiction | The Interpreter of Dreams and Maladies by Mark Budman

Mark Budman The Interpreter of Dreams and Maladies I. Stick Figures in Paradise The interpreter of dreams and maladies draws a stick figure with an orange crayon. “This is you,” he explains to his two year old granddaughter. Her mother, the interpreter’s daughter, is nursing the other twin in the bedroom upstairs. The interpreter draws a smaller stick figure next, in purple. “That’s...

News | The London Magazine & Collyer Bristow Prize 2019

Update: Submissions are now closed for The London Magazine & Collyer Bristow Prize 2019. Thank you to all publishers who entered this year.  Update: Collyer Bristow Brize 2019 shortlist announced Click to read the shortlist The London Magazine has launched its debut fiction prize for a second year following the success of its inaugural year. The award will be administered by the magazine’s editorial team,...

Interview | Johnnie Cooper | throe on throe

A new exhibition at Saatchi Gallery sees a major survey by the acclaimed British artist Johnnie Cooper. Spanning two galleries, throe on throe comprises over 50 paintings and sculptures from the 1970’s – a time when Cooper appeared alongside Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth with his own solo exhibition to mark the Wakefield Silver Jubilee Festival – to his most recent atmospheric large-scale oil...

Fiction | The Bone Mole by Ed Cottrell

Ed Cottrell The Bone Mole ———There was a little bone mole for sale, a carving of a mole made of bone. It caught my eye sitting at the bottom of a clear glass bottle. It lay still and then – thud – it came to life, preening itself with bone claws. Unable to comprehend what it was I held it up...

Poetry | Coot by Iain Twiddy

Iain Twiddy Coot It didn’t need to be a big ripple nudging its reed-nest for the overstep to plop into the up-plump of the breast, and the coot to clear into the stream of itself (not the moorhen), spooking along as if scared of its reflection. It was only the Slea, where no eagles peered, herons rarely stabbed, where foxes didn’t grin, panting down the bank. So maybe it...

Interview | Ilana Manolson | Chance Encounters

Inspired by the fluidity and evolution of nature, the acclaimed Canadian American artist Ilana Manolson expresses both a personal and abstract interpretation of the natural world in her paintings. Her first London exhibition, Chance Encounters features over 20 paintings illustrating the movement, change, and fragility of life and nature.  In the lead up to the exhibition opening at Cadogan...

Extract | Flogging a Dead Clothes Horse by Thom Cuell

We'll Never Have Paris, ed. Andrew Gallix, Repeater Books, May 2019
The following is an extract from We’ll Never Have Paris edited by Andrew Gallix (3:AM Magazine) — a new collection of fiction and essays on anglophone visions of Paris featuring contributions from over 70 writers, including Tom McCarthy, Eley Williams, Max Porter, Joanna Walsh, Stewart Home, Sophie Mackintosh. Published by Repeater Books on 21st May 2019.  Thom Cuell Flogging a Dead...

Review | Fresh Complaint by Jeffrey Eugenides & Days of Awe by A. M. Homes

Jeffrey Eugenides’s latest short story collection is packed full of literary treats in case you haven’t read them when they originally appeared in The New Yorker and other equally prestigious magazines. The stories were written over a period of more than twenty years. Only the title story “Fresh Complaint” and “Complainers” were written specifically for the collection, but all...

DON'T MISS OUT

The latest content, freebies, news and competition updates, right to your inbox.

You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us, or by contacting us at info@thelondonmagazine.org. Find our privacy policies and terms of use here, or at the bottom of all pages of the website.