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Robert Greer

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The London Magazine Podcast | Episode 4 | A Discovery of Ancient Literature

We were recently contacted by Reverend Christian Mitchell of the church of Heathfield in rural Sussex, who had made a remarkable discovery. In one of the rectories attached to an old church in the area, they had found an almost full collection of the original London Magazine, dating from 1733 to 1770, which were believed to have belonged to...

Review | Theatre | The Unreturning at the Everyman Theatre

Frantic Assembly’s latest project “The Unreturning” arrives at Theatre Royal Stratford East in January 2019. This time, their celebrated physicality explores the lives of three Scarborough men returning from separate wars: a shell-shocked English serviceman returning from France in 1918, a dishonourably dismissed soldier returning from a military tour in Iraq in 2013, and finally, a refugee desperately trying...

Review | Green Noise by Jean Sprackland

Green Noise, Jean Sprackland, Jonathan Cape, 2018, 64pp, £10.00 With Green Noise, the fifth collection from Jean Sprackland, she attunes us to a planetary resonance. Many of these poems speak directly to our sense of sound, and Sprackland operates on multiple scales to revel in the concert of nature. In the twenty-first century, this is an architectonic reckoning, from species to domain...

Archive | Pier Paolo Pasolini — Divina Mimesis: Canto VII

Pier Paolo Pasolini was an Italian poet, novelist and film-maker, who died in mysterious circumstances in 1975 in an as-yet-unsolved murder case. Hailed by many as one of the great intellectual voices of post-war Europe, throughout his life and work Pasolini spoke out against the Vatican and the Mafia, as well as the alienating effect of mass media and...

Review | All Under One Roof by Evelyn Schlag

ALL UNDER ONE ROOF Evelyn Schlag (Translated by Karen Leeder) Carcanet, June 2018 Since 1981 Austrian poet, Evelyn Schlag has published critically-acclaimed poetry, prose and short stories, as well as translations (notably the sonnets of Douglas Dunn) and essays. Amongst others she’s been awarded: the 1988 Bremer Förderpreis, the 1997 Anton Wildgans Prize, and the Otto Stoessl Prize in 1998. In 2012...

Review | Women Talking by Miriam Toews

It seems ironic that a work so concerned with the female voice should be written from a man's perspective. But this is the contradiction that sits at the heart of Miriam Toews’s Women Talking, and it neatly illustrates the plight of her characters. The story takes place in a remote Mennonite Christian community. Here, the women quilt, milk cows, and...

Confessions of an English Opium Eater: An Essay by David Punter

Before its controversial and ground-breaking publication as a book in 1822, Thomas De Quincey's autobiographical account of opiate addiction Confessions of an English Opium Eater was first published anonymously in The London Magazine across two issues in September and October 1821. Just over 187 years later in our Dec/Jan 2009 edition, the academic and literary historian David Punter took another...

Review | Beck at Browns by Steven O’Brien

July this year in London was out of kilter with the heat. We walked through Green Park under the plane trees towards Mayfair and the leaves cast salad-green shadows on my friend’s face. Everywhere people were seeking the shade. When we crossed the threshold of Browns’ Hotel I was reminded immediately of Laurie Lee’s description of the bars of...

Review | The King and the Catholics: The Fight for Rights 1829 by Antonia Fraser

In an age which has sidelined the Christian faith, the long, bitterly contested campaign to remove the serious discrimination suffered by Roman Catholics in the United Kingdom for nearly three centuries after the Reformation is seldom recalled, except by apologists for Irish nationalism. The struggle for Catholic rights lasted some fifty years, from the 1770s until 1829 when what...

Artist and Bon Viveur | Andrew Lambirth

John Craxton in Greece: The Unseen Works, Osborne Samuel, 23 Dering Street, London W1, 10 May - 8 June 2018 Charmed lives in Greece: Ghika, Craxton, Leigh Fermor, British Museum, London, 8 March - 15 July 2018 This radiant early summer in London has been enlivened by two exhibitions focusing on the artist John Craxton (1922-2009): a one-person mini-retrospective at the commercial...

Playing Safe | Hugo Williams

I liked not liking you much. I liked playing safe. Not being bowled over by you was part of the thrill. At the King’s Palace Hotel you couldn’t take your hands off me, you couldn’t care less how quickly or stupidly we made love, so long as it happened. So why should it ever end? I never dreamed you were serious when you put me on probation for ‘loitering without...

My London | Tyne O’Connell

O’Connell lives and works in Mayfair, which serves as a backdrop for much of her contemporary women’s fiction, including ‘Making The A-List’. This is the twenty-eighth article in our regular “My London” series. I’ve spent most of my life in Mayfair in a fourth floor walkup of a dormer-roofed, Queen Anne inspired pink-terrace of Mount Street. My father lived a...

The London Magazine Podcast – Episode 2 – An Interview with Katie Hale

[soundcloud url="https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/477008793" params="color=#ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&show_teaser=true&visual=true" width="100%" height="300" iframe="true" /] We are pleased to share with you the second episode of our new podcast. In this episode, Suzannah V. Evans interviews poet Katie Hale at StAnza Poetry Festival, and discusses Cumbrian Dialect, her upcoming novel as part of Penguin Random House's #WriteNow scheme, and reads us a few of her poems. Featuring exclusive sneak peaks of some...

Staff Picks – July 2018

The London Magazine's July Staff Picks! Recommendations for the very best in arts, culture and literature from the staff at The London Magazine. Steven O'Brien - Editor Let's All Kill Constance - Ray Bradbury   One of Ray Bradbury’s forgotten classics that I’m really enjoying at the moment.         Lucy Binnersley - Assistant Editor Crudo - Olivia Laing  The acclaimed British writer Olivia Laing returns with her debut...

Review | Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up and Dorothea Lange: The Politics of Seeing

Frida Kahlo: Making Her Self Up, Victoria & Albert Museum, Circe Henestrosa & Claire Wilcox, until November 4th 2018 Dorothea Lange: The Politics of Seeing, Barbican Art Gallery, Alona Pardo, until September 2nd   There is at present a case in the V&A which houses some sixteen mannequins of papier-mâché with moulded crowns of braids. In their midst rises a glittering, gilded...

Novel Writing Competition Winners

After an overwhelming response to our first ever Novel Writing Competition, The London Magazine and Author Enterprises are extremely pleased to announce the winners: First Place Big Basin Yellow Sky by Vivian Hassan-Lambert Second Place Motherlands by Madeleine Kilminster Third Place Unspoken by Briony Hey Our judges were delighted with the high standard of writing and variety in theme, and would like to thank everybody who entered. It was a difficult decision...

Review | The Lieutenant of Inishmore at Noël Coward Theatre

For his West End debut, Aiden Turner, star of BBC’s hit TV show Poldark, had huge expectations to fill. Written by Martin McDonagh, director of Oscar award winning film “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri”, the play was black comedy at its darkest, but packed with enough shock and humour to have the audience in stitches. We first meet Turner’s character...

Interview | Lucy Pearson, The Literary Edit

Lucy Pearson runs The Literary Edit book blog and @the_litedit on Instagram. She has over 11,000 followers and has been blogging since 2012, and most recently won The London Book Fair's Blogger of the Year award.  Could you tell us a little about yourself as an introduction to our readers? Of course – I’m Lucy from The Literary Edit, a book...

Essay Competition 2018

UPDATE: EXTENDED CLOSING DATE  The competition will now be open for entries until September the 7th at midnight. As the oldest literary and arts review in the UK, The London Magazine has a long history of publishing great essayists; works by the likes of T.S. Eliot and Nadine Gordimer can be found in our archives. In our second Essay Competition, we hope to...

Interview | Jude Christian – Nanjing at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

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We stopped by The Sam Wanamaker Playhouse at The Globe to talk to Jude Christian about her play Nanjing.  Nanjing is part of The Globe's Refugee Week 2018 and is playing from Friday 22nd June - Sunday 24th June. Tickets and information available here.

Review | The Pleasures of Queuing by Erik Martiny

Erik Martiny The Pleasures of Queueing Mastodon Publishing 2018 ISBN 978-1-7320091-1-0 In chapter 13 of his very funny and entirely absorbing novel, Erik Martiny has his narrator and protagonist Olaf Montcocq describe his family thus: “All in all, we are the happiest and most fully functional dysfunctional family I know. Totally and felicitously dysfunctional.” Olaf is right on every level, and the prose...

Interview | Sophie Collins, Mark Ford and Les Robinson

We had a quick chat with the judges of our 2018 Poetry Prize - Sophie Collins, Mark Ford and Les Robinson - to give our readers insight into their work and all things poetry!   Can you describe what you're looking for in five words? Sophie: Not at all. If I knew the answer to this question I would stop reading altogether. Mark: Memorable, distinctive,...

Extending the Range of Pejoratives: Howard Jacobson’s Pussy

Written in “a fury of disbelief” during the weeks that followed the unlikely election of Donald Trump, Howard Jacobson’s latest novel Pussy dramatizes the education and rise to power of Prince Fracassus, heir to the Duchy of Origen, until he begins to preside over the Republic of Urbs-Ludus. The plotline is minimal but engrossing thanks to Jacobson’s spirited, arch tone...

Donald Trump – America’s First Oligarch-in-Chief

By Mohammad Zahoor On 20th January this year Donald Trump was sworn in as President of the United States. In the eyes of millions both internationally and at home in America the spectacle of such a man becoming head of state in the world’s most powerful country was nothing short of astonishing. There was widespread alarm at how this had...

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