Home Authors Posts by Robert Greer

Robert Greer

81 POSTS 0 COMMENTS

Interview: Adriaan van Heerden — Unreal City

Adriaan van Heerden is an artist and photographer whose work has been exhibited in London, Barcelona, Kyoto and Singapore, and who was nominated for the ArtGemini Prize last year. His latest project Unreal City is a photographic exploration of contemporary London through the prism of the poem The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot. We spoke to him to find...

Interview | Amy Sackville

Back in March at the London Book Fair earlier this year, Vanessa Wheeler sat down with the author Amy Sackville to ask her about her writing techniques, and the release of her third novel, Painter to the King (Granta Books, 2018). The novel—an immersive blend of art history, sensory detail, and spatial exploration—tells the story of the complex relationship between...

Review | The Triumph of Cancer by Chris McCabe

The scientific language used by doctors to describe cancer—the uncontrollable growth of a single cell—is often mystifying and alienating. Can the experience of cancer better be expressed through poetry? McCabe’s latest poetry collection The Triumph of Cancer, a work searching for ways to articulate his father’s brain cancer, and in turn his own grief, attempts to deal with this...

Essay | Living in London: Highgate by Jonathan Raban

Jonathan Raban is an award-winning writer, author of among many others, 1974's Soft City, an early classic of psychogeographical urban writing. In February 1970 he wrote the following essay for the "Living in London" essay series, of which this was the fifth instalment. Jonathan Raban Living in London: V .....The best place to commit suicide in north London is from the top...

Fiction | The Mercedes by Anna Kavan

Anna Kavan (name at birth Helen Woods) is most famous for the psychological, otherworldly fiction of Asylum Piece (1940) and Ice (1967), and was called "De Quincey's heir and Kafka's sister" by the science-fiction writer Brian Aldiss. The following short story was originally published in The London Magazine in February 1970, just over a year after her death in 1968,...

Review | Space Shifters at the Hayward Gallery

An unmitigated treat if you love conceptual art installations and sculptures, SPACE SHIFTERS features twenty artists exploring our perception of space and 'optical' minimalism. Spanning a period of roughly fifty years, the works are broadly grouped into two categories: those that play with perception using reflective materials, ranging from stainless steel to engine oil; and those constructed of translucent materials,...

Review | Hansel and Gretel at the Royal Opera House

The operatic Christmas mainstay Hansel and Gretel, by Humperdinck, makes a long awaited return to the Royal Opera House; it’s first time since January 2011. The opera equivalent to Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker in terms of Christmas wonder and that indefinable seasonal splendour, although in the UK it hasn’t achieved that in-demand revivability. Although Oliver Mears, the relatively new head of...

Review | Charlotte Prodger and Forensic Architecture — The Turner Prize Exhibition at Tate Britain

In The War of Desire and Technology at the Close of the Mechanical Age, Allucquére  Roseanne Stone discusses how our consciousness is altered by the way we’re immersed in technology. For Stone, technology recreates representations of time, space and being. She believed that virtual environments allow the terms self and body to mean different things, legitimising multiple forms of...

Essay | The Bazooka Girl — A Note On Anna Kavan by Rhys Davies

The following piece is taken from The London Magazine, February 1970. It was written by Rhys Davies, a close friend of Anna Kavan's, and was published alongside the short story 'The Mercedes'. Biography from Penguin: "Anna Kavan was born in 1901, the only child of a wealthy British family. She began publishing under her married name, Helen Ferguson. During this time, she...

Essay | The Wild Side of Town by Alexis Self

There are millions of miles of Montessori walls filled with quotations about the virtues of sharing. But you don’t want to get to your favourite restaurant and find you have to wait for a table. In the stifling urban environment it’s only natural to crave a no man’s land. This is how I feel about Wormwood Scrubs. I’ll extol...

Interview | Trate | Emotive Brutes

Canadian artist Trate is causing a stir in London’s art world, and this will intensify next year when he holds his first U.K show. Digby Warde-Aldam tracked him down to his east end lair, Trate Studios on the Regent’s Canal, to find out who the hell he is... It is a miserable Thursday evening in...

News | The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year

Adam Weymouth was announced as the winner of The Sunday Times / Peters Fraser + Dunlop Young Writer of the Year award last night, at a reception at The London Library in St. James' Square. The annual prize seeks to reward the best work of fiction, non-fiction or poetry by British and Irish authors under the age of 35, and is...

Review | Krzysztof Gil: Welcome to the Country Where the Gypsy has been Hunted at l’étrangère

On view at l’étrangère gallery in East London is the first ever UK solo exhibition by the Polish Roma artist Krzysztof Gil. Entitled Welcome to the Country Where the Gypsy Has Been Hunted, the show takes as its point of departure the contested practice of ‘Heidenjachten’, literally – gypsy hunting – the legally sanctioned hunting of Roma people for...

Review | Shitstorm by Fernando Sdrigotti

Shitstorm, Fernando Sdrigotti, Open Pen, 2018, £4.99 Among four equally alluring others, Open Pen’s new series of “novelettes” features Fernando Sdrigotti’s latest story Shitstorm, which delves into the unsettling nature of viral news and online scandals. His perceptive insights, coupled with often crude but amusing satire, lead one through a dizzying and chaotic cultural landscape that is disturbingly akin to...

Poetry | A Series of Ekphrastic Poems on Eileen Agar’s Marine Object by Suzannah V. Evans

Suzannah V. Evans is a poet, editor, and critic. The following series of poems was inspired by a visit to the exhibition Virginia Woolf: An Exhibition Inspired By Her Writings at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge (reviewed here for The London Magazine), and more specifically, the poems are based on the piece Marine Object by Eileen Agar. Suzannah has...

News | London’s BIG READ 2019 Shortlist

Last night saw the launch of London's BIG READ 2019, with the shortlisted authors announced last night at an event at LIBRARY on St Martin's Lane.  The aim of London's BIG READ is to bring the city together through reading books that expand understanding of our community, and the initiative also raises money through a number of fundraising activities throughout the...

Flash Fiction | Never Fall For That by Rebecca Lilly

"Clarify your intent," — Lama Chopra, our meditation teacher, rang the bell for us to sit — "the Reaper was once an old friend." My empty mind was eating me up: black bit-strings of acid. My poems were hot- spots. I was mapping the mess like a Dadaist.   An old friend. I shut my eyes momentarily,  sensing snowflakes, the floaters of starlight white roses where the...

Review | Now, Now, Louison by Jean Frémon

Now, Now, Louison, Jean Frémon (translated by Cole Swensen), Les Fugitives, 2018, pp.115, £12.00 Now, Now, Louison, originally published in French as Calme-toi, Louison in 2016, is a strange and very beautiful book. An unusual but very touching tribute, it is a poetic meditation on the life of the artist Louise Bourgeois (1911 - 2010) written by her friend Jean Frémon (writer...

Review | Virginia Woolf: An Exhibition Inspired By Her Writings — Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

The first thing that you see as you enter the Virginia Woolf exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum is a photograph of Woolf’s writing desk. Taken by Gisèle Freund two decades after Woolf’s death, the image ties together some of the exhibition’s themes: the relationship between writing and looking, between inside and out, between public and private space. In the...

Review | Death and Other Holidays by Marci Vogel

Death and Other Holidays, Marci Vogel, Melville House, November 2018 Award-winning writer, poet and translator Marci Vogel is the author of the poetry collection At the Border of Wilshire and Nobody, and this, her debut work of fiction, won the inaugural Miami Book Fair / de Groot Prize for fiction. Death and Other Holidays follows a year in the life of April,...

Review | Glad I Did It — Christina Reihill at Bermondsey Project Space

Made up of three L-shaped levels, Christina Reihill's Glad I did it is an invitation into the mind and last days of Ruth Ellis, the last woman in Britain to be executed by the state. A London nightclub hostess, Ellis fell in love with young racing driver David Blakely.  After a torrid and abusive affair, Ruth shot her lover...

Review | Salvador Dali At Home

Salvador Dali At Home, Jackie De Burca, Quarto, 2018, pp. 176, Hardcover, £25 Salvador Dali at Home is a book that seeks to unveil the places and people that shaped the work of one of the greatest Surrealist artists. The biography offers an intriguing behind the scenes look into the private life of Salvador Dali, illuminating the influential forces he was...

Review | Exposure by Olivia Sudjic

Exposure, Olivia Sudjic, Pensinsula Press, 2018, pp. 127, £6 Exposure, the new book by Olivia Sudjic, elegantly dissects the multi-layered web of anxieties particular to the age in which we currently live. Exposure is the third of four impressive pocket essay books by the Peninsula Press, who launched earlier this with the publication David Wojnarowicz’s short fiction collection The Waterfront Journals. My...

Interview | 2018 Short Story Prize Judges!

With only a few weeks remaining for our Short Story Prize for this year, we thought we would catch up with our judges to ask them what they thought makes a good short story, and what they were looking for in the submissions. Read below for what their thoughts! About our judges: Samuel Fisher‘s debut novel, The Chameleon, was published by Salt...

DON'T MISS OUT

The latest content, freebies, news and competition updates, right to your inbox.

You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us, or by contacting us at info@thelondonmagazine.org. Find our privacy policies and terms of use here, or at the bottom of all pages of the website.