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Robert Greer

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Interview | Kevin Breathnach

I had intended my interview with Kevin Breathnach to go smoothly and at first it appeared to be doing so. We had arranged a time for a discussion over Skype, had both logged on at that appointed time, and he had made contact in the chat box: ‘Ready whenever you are but no rush!’ Then came the first crisis:...

Review | Henry Hudson — nothing sticks to nothing at Hannah Barry Gallery

The story being told is not one of words, but of a language that finds roots beyond symbols defined by mere convention. Memories that are both past and future, a now that has the present somehow out of reach – a limbo. Henry Hudson is no stranger to the art world. He is known for his particular use of plasticine...

Review | Emotive Brutes at Trate Studios

Far from the crowded and anxious streets of a city that has made insomnia the rule, sits the rare exception, Emotive Brutes, a solo exhibition by the Canadian artist Trate. The path to Trate Studios encourages a slower pace, contemplation of surroundings that seem to broaden around us, setting the perfect tone for what then follows – an oasis...

Review | Don McCullin at Tate Britain

We live in an era in which we see more images than ever before in human history. When we see these images, in newspapers or magazines for instance, it is easy to immediately consign these images to the historical moment that they depict. In this way it is difficult to learn from history, as the relevance of what is...

The London Magazine Short Story Prize 2018 — Winner’s Announced!

After an overwhelming response to this year's shortlist, our judges Samuel Fisher, Layla Benitez-James and Harry Mount have arrived at a decision for this year's winners. 1st Place: Igbo Boys by Chuck Nwoke 2nd Place: Steer The Dark Skies Blue by Niamh MacCabe 3rd Place: The Prisoner by Tammye Huf Full Shortlist Igbo Boys - Chuck Nwoke Niamh MacCabe - Steer The Dark Skies Blue The Prisoner...

Review | The Cemetery in Barnes by Gabriel Josipovici

“After all, everyone has fantasies. In the one life there are many lives. Alternative lives. Some are lived and others imagined. That is the absurdity of biographies, he would say, of novels. They never take account of the alternative lives casting their shadows over us as we move slowly, as though in a dream, from birth to maturity to...

Review | Leminscate by Chris Viner

Leminscate, Chris Viner, Unsolicited Press, 2017, pp. 72 The 6th isn’t busy. Six days since the attack And inside the Monoprix The aisles of life still reel along, refrigerated and stacked. I drum my fingers on the green pine And scan the shelves for a bottle of wine — “The 6th Arrondissement” The collection Lemniscate opens abruptly in the days after 2015 Paris attacks, and the...

Review | The Monstrous Child at The Royal Opera House

The newly refurbished Linbury Theatre in the Royal Opera House is having its first opera performances with the world premiere of The Monstrous Child, based on the novel of the same name by Francesca Simon (who also wrote the libretto) with music by Gavin Higgins in his operatic debut with the inspiring Aurora Orchestra in the pit. At just...

Review | Abuse II, The Uncanny by Alessio Bolzoni

At first you see the bodies and ask yourself why – that is how the story begins, how the narrative unravels, how you are made to look beyond. Photographer Alessio Bolzoni, who has undertaken campaigns for prestigious brands alongside his artistic practice, embraces his experimental side in Abuse II, The Uncanny, the second volume in a project he started in...

Review | Number One Chinese Restaurant by Lillian Li

“Jimmy was starting to stand when a resigned, almost amused look passed over Ah-Jack’s face. Like he was tired of waiting for disaster to strike. Before Jimmy could stop him, Ah-Jack took one of his hands away from the plate to grab the two serving spoons. His left wrist did not even make an attempt to hold the weight...

Preview | Laws of Motion in a Cartoon Landscape at the Cinema Museum

Artist Andy Holden’s acclaimed film Laws of Motion in a Cartoon Landscape has its London debut at the Cinema Museum in Kennington Laws of Motion in a Cartoon Landscape (2011-2017), artist Andy Holden’s acclaimed film proposing that the world is now best understood as a cartoon, will be shown for the first time in London. More than five years in...

Interview | Raymond Antrobus

Raymond Antrobus is a poet, educator, curator, editor and investigator of missing sounds, who is a founding member of Chill Pill as well as the Keats House Poets Forum, and whose work has appeared in publications such as Poetry Review, The New Statesman and The Deaf Poets Society, among many others. In 2017 he was awarded the Geoffrey Dearmer Prize  for...

Review | Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know by Colm Tóibín

Mad, Bad, Dangerous to Know: The Fathers of Wilde, Yeats and Joyce, Colm Tóibín, Viking, 2018, pp.192, £14.99 Strolling through the Dublin where he once studied, Tóibín muses on the city’s remarkable literary history: ‘The domed Reading Room has not changed since the time of Yeats and Joyce. It has the same light and layout, the same noises, perhaps even some...

Review | Mothlight by Adam Scovell

Adam Scovell’s debut novel is narrated by Thomas, a young man who hallucinates the memories of his deceased mentor, Phyllis Ewans. Phyllis is a lepidopterist who lived in Thomas’s town in Cheshire when he was a child, and they reconnect in London after Thomas has also become an academic who studies moths. He travels and researches with her as...

Review | Nocilla Lab | Agustín Fernández Mallo

Nocilla Lab, Agustín Fernández Mallo (Translated by Thomas Bunstead), Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2019, pp. 192, £12.99 "The fascination of humankind with beaches goes to the heart of a time that has the form of a Rubik's cube." It is difficult to summarize Agustín Fernández Mallo's Nocilla Lab, or even to put together one's thoughts about it. Translated from the original Spanish by...

Dido and Aeneas by Jeffrey Meyers

Autumn in Venice: Ernest Hemingway and His Last Muse, Andrea di Robilant, Atlantic Books, 348 pp. £17.99 (hardback). Andrea di Robilant has done extensive research, but has not found significant new material about Hemingway and his love and inspiration Adriana Ivancich.  He is good, however, on the rivalry of the Italian publishers Mondadori and Einaudi.  He often mentions his uncle Carlo...

Interview | Andrew Kötting at St Leonards International Film Festival

St Leonard's International Film Festival Blackmarket VIP, George St, Hastings 19-21th January HUBUBINTHEBAOBABS - 1987 33 minutes HOI POLLOI 1990 - 10 minutes SMART ALEK 1993 - 18 minutes JAUNT 1995 - 5 minutes DONKEYHEAD 1998 - 4minutes KINGDOMPROTISTA 2000 – 6 minutes ME 1999 - 5minutes In the seaside town of Hastings, in an old, old street in the old town, I climb up the stairs on a cold Sunday night to find myself in a large high room that I'm told is a...

Review | Among The Lost by Emiliano Monge

In the desolate wastelands between the sierra and the jungle, under an all-seeing, unforgiving sun, a single day unfolds as relentlessly as those that have gone before. People are trafficked and brutalised, illegal migrants are cheated of their money, their dreams, their very names even as countless others scrabble to cross the border, trying to reach a land they...

Review | GeorgII Uvs | Full Circle: The Beauty of Inevitability at Saatchi Gallery

Science and art come together under the inventive hand of GeorgII Uvs in Full Circle: The Beauty of Inevitability. A student of geology gone explorer of the fine arts, his vibrant work reflects the relationship between fields many a time introduced as strangers to one another. The common ground where they meet is chance – the ultimate, the inevitable...

Kenneth Womack | The Making of Penny Lane

The following is an extract from Sound Pictures: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin (The Later Years: 1966-2016) by Kenneth Womack, published by Orphans Publishing, 2018.  Republished in The London Magazine with permission.  ...By January 1967, record-company brass on both sides of the Atlantic were clamoring for new Beatles product posthaste. And their concerns naturally cascaded around manager Brian...

Spotlight III: Influx Press

The London Magazine has long been a champion of emerging writers and independent publishers, stretching back to the 1950s and 60s, when young writers like Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes found a home in the pages of the then newly re-launched volumes of the magazine. We want this tradition to continue, and given the renaissance of new independent publishers, we...

Review | Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life, Death, Rebirth at Royal Academy

In a contemporary art world dominated by video art (as shown by the 2018 Turner Prize) Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life, Death, Rebirth presents a new approach to the medium, through the utilisation of drawings by the High Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti. Bill Viola / Michelangelo: Life, Death, Rebirth displays the large scale video works of Bill Viola alongside the...

Review | Alejandro Zambra | Not to Read

Lending books to friends. Reading photocopies of novels while smoking a cigarette. Finding the previous owner's angry scribbles in a second-hand paperback. What comes of reading other people's letters? Why is Tanizaki lurking in the shadows? In Not To Read — from the original Spanish No Leer (2010) — Alejandro Zambra puts together a myriad of dispersed thoughts, notes written across...

Interview | David Keenan | For The Good Times

After a career as a music writer spanning more than 20 years, David Keenan released his first novel This Is Memorial Device in 2017, a novel about a fictional music scene set in Airdrie, Scotland in 1983, during the middle of the post-punk boom. Psychedelic, hilarious and genuinely affecting, it achieved much critical acclaim, and won the inaugural London Magazine...

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