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Robert Greer

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Review | Charlotte Prodger and Forensic Architecture — The Turner Prize Exhibition at Tate Britain

In The War of Desire and Technology at the Close of the Mechanical Age, Allucquére  Roseanne Stone discusses how our consciousness is altered by the way we’re immersed in technology. For Stone, technology recreates representations of time, space and being. She believed that virtual environments allow the terms self and body to mean different things, legitimising multiple forms of...

Essay | The Bazooka Girl — A Note On Anna Kavan by Rhys Davies

The following piece is taken from The London Magazine, February 1970. It was written by Rhys Davies, a close friend of Anna Kavan's, and was published alongside the short story 'The Mercedes'. Biography from Penguin: "Anna Kavan was born in 1901, the only child of a wealthy British family. She began publishing under her married name, Helen Ferguson. During this time, she...

Essay | The Wild Side of Town by Alexis Self

There are millions of miles of Montessori walls filled with quotations about the virtues of sharing. But you don’t want to get to your favourite restaurant and find you have to wait for a table. In the stifling urban environment it’s only natural to crave a no man’s land. This is how I feel about Wormwood Scrubs. I’ll extol...

Interview | Trate | Emotive Brutes

Canadian artist Trate is causing a stir in London’s art world, and this will intensify next year when he holds his first U.K show. Digby Warde-Aldam tracked him down to his east end lair, Trate Studios on the Regent’s Canal, to find out who the hell he is... It is a miserable Thursday evening in...

News | The Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year

Adam Weymouth was announced as the winner of The Sunday Times / Peters Fraser + Dunlop Young Writer of the Year award last night, at a reception at The London Library in St. James' Square. The annual prize seeks to reward the best work of fiction, non-fiction or poetry by British and Irish authors under the age of 35, and is...

Review | Krzysztof Gil: Welcome to the Country Where the Gypsy has been Hunted at l’étrangère

On view at l’étrangère gallery in East London is the first ever UK solo exhibition by the Polish Roma artist Krzysztof Gil. Entitled Welcome to the Country Where the Gypsy Has Been Hunted, the show takes as its point of departure the contested practice of ‘Heidenjachten’, literally – gypsy hunting – the legally sanctioned hunting of Roma people for...

Review | Shitstorm by Fernando Sdrigotti

Shitstorm, Fernando Sdrigotti, Open Pen, 2018, £4.99 Among four equally alluring others, Open Pen’s new series of “novelettes” features Fernando Sdrigotti’s latest story Shitstorm, which delves into the unsettling nature of viral news and online scandals. His perceptive insights, coupled with often crude but amusing satire, lead one through a dizzying and chaotic cultural landscape that is disturbingly akin to...

Poetry | A Series of Ekphrastic Poems on Eileen Agar’s Marine Object by Suzannah V. Evans

Suzannah V. Evans is a poet, editor, and critic. The following series of poems was inspired by a visit to the exhibition Virginia Woolf: An Exhibition Inspired By Her Writings at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge (reviewed here for The London Magazine), and more specifically, the poems are based on the piece Marine Object by Eileen Agar. Suzannah has...

News | London’s BIG READ 2019 Shortlist

Last night saw the launch of London's BIG READ 2019, with the shortlisted authors announced last night at an event at LIBRARY on St Martin's Lane.  The aim of London's BIG READ is to bring the city together through reading books that expand understanding of our community, and the initiative also raises money through a number of fundraising activities throughout the...

Flash Fiction | Never Fall For That by Rebecca Lilly

"Clarify your intent," — Lama Chopra, our meditation teacher, rang the bell for us to sit — "the Reaper was once an old friend." My empty mind was eating me up: black bit-strings of acid. My poems were hot- spots. I was mapping the mess like a Dadaist.   An old friend. I shut my eyes momentarily,  sensing snowflakes, the floaters of starlight white roses where the...

Review | Now, Now, Louison by Jean Frémon

Now, Now, Louison, Jean Frémon (translated by Cole Swensen), Les Fugitives, 2018, pp.115, £12.00 Now, Now, Louison, originally published in French as Calme-toi, Louison in 2016, is a strange and very beautiful book. An unusual but very touching tribute, it is a poetic meditation on the life of the artist Louise Bourgeois (1911 - 2010) written by her friend Jean Frémon (writer...

Review | Virginia Woolf: An Exhibition Inspired By Her Writings — Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

The first thing that you see as you enter the Virginia Woolf exhibition at the Fitzwilliam Museum is a photograph of Woolf’s writing desk. Taken by Gisèle Freund two decades after Woolf’s death, the image ties together some of the exhibition’s themes: the relationship between writing and looking, between inside and out, between public and private space. In the...

Review | Death and Other Holidays by Marci Vogel

Death and Other Holidays, Marci Vogel, Melville House, November 2018 Award-winning writer, poet and translator Marci Vogel is the author of the poetry collection At the Border of Wilshire and Nobody, and this, her debut work of fiction, won the inaugural Miami Book Fair / de Groot Prize for fiction. Death and Other Holidays follows a year in the life of April,...

Review | Glad I Did It — Christina Reihill at Bermondsey Project Space

Made up of three L-shaped levels, Christina Reihill's Glad I did it is an invitation into the mind and last days of Ruth Ellis, the last woman in Britain to be executed by the state. A London nightclub hostess, Ellis fell in love with young racing driver David Blakely.  After a torrid and abusive affair, Ruth shot her lover...

Review | Salvador Dali At Home

Salvador Dali At Home, Jackie De Burca, Quarto, 2018, pp. 176, Hardcover, £25 Salvador Dali at Home is a book that seeks to unveil the places and people that shaped the work of one of the greatest Surrealist artists. The biography offers an intriguing behind the scenes look into the private life of Salvador Dali, illuminating the influential forces he was...

Review | Exposure by Olivia Sudjic

Exposure, Olivia Sudjic, Pensinsula Press, 2018, pp. 127, £6 Exposure, the new book by Olivia Sudjic, elegantly dissects the multi-layered web of anxieties particular to the age in which we currently live. Exposure is the third of four impressive pocket essay books by the Peninsula Press, who launched earlier this with the publication David Wojnarowicz’s short fiction collection The Waterfront Journals. My...

Interview | 2018 Short Story Prize Judges!

With only a few weeks remaining for our Short Story Prize for this year, we thought we would catch up with our judges to ask them what they thought makes a good short story, and what they were looking for in the submissions. Read below for what their thoughts! About our judges: Samuel Fisher‘s debut novel, The Chameleon, was published by Salt...

The London Magazine Podcast | Episode 4 | A Discovery of Ancient Literature

We were recently contacted by Reverend Christian Mitchell of the church of Heathfield in rural Sussex, who had made a remarkable discovery. In one of the rectories attached to an old church in the area, they had found an almost full collection of the original London Magazine, dating from 1733 to 1770, which were believed to have belonged to...

Review | Theatre | The Unreturning at the Everyman Theatre

Frantic Assembly’s latest project “The Unreturning” arrives at Theatre Royal Stratford East in January 2019. This time, their celebrated physicality explores the lives of three Scarborough men returning from separate wars: a shell-shocked English serviceman returning from France in 1918, a dishonourably dismissed soldier returning from a military tour in Iraq in 2013, and finally, a refugee desperately trying...

Review | Green Noise by Jean Sprackland

Green Noise, Jean Sprackland, Jonathan Cape, 2018, 64pp, £10.00 With Green Noise, the fifth collection from Jean Sprackland, she attunes us to a planetary resonance. Many of these poems speak directly to our sense of sound, and Sprackland operates on multiple scales to revel in the concert of nature. In the twenty-first century, this is an architectonic reckoning, from species to domain...

Archive | Pier Paolo Pasolini — Divina Mimesis: Canto VII

Pier Paolo Pasolini was an Italian poet, novelist and film-maker, who died in mysterious circumstances in 1975 in an as-yet-unsolved murder case. Hailed by many as one of the great intellectual voices of post-war Europe, throughout his life and work Pasolini spoke out against the Vatican and the Mafia, as well as the alienating effect of mass media and...

Review | All Under One Roof by Evelyn Schlag

ALL UNDER ONE ROOF Evelyn Schlag (Translated by Karen Leeder) Carcanet, June 2018 Since 1981 Austrian poet, Evelyn Schlag has published critically-acclaimed poetry, prose and short stories, as well as translations (notably the sonnets of Douglas Dunn) and essays. Amongst others she’s been awarded: the 1988 Bremer Förderpreis, the 1997 Anton Wildgans Prize, and the Otto Stoessl Prize in 1998. In 2012...

Review | Women Talking by Miriam Toews

It seems ironic that a work so concerned with the female voice should be written from a man's perspective. But this is the contradiction that sits at the heart of Miriam Toews’s Women Talking, and it neatly illustrates the plight of her characters. The story takes place in a remote Mennonite Christian community. Here, the women quilt, milk cows, and...

Confessions of an English Opium Eater: An Essay by David Punter

Before its controversial and ground-breaking publication as a book in 1822, Thomas De Quincey's autobiographical account of opiate addiction Confessions of an English Opium Eater was first published anonymously in The London Magazine across two issues in September and October 1821. Just over 187 years later in our Dec/Jan 2009 edition, the academic and literary historian David Punter took another...

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