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In the Belly of a Beast – The Serpentine Pavilion

On the 25th June The Serpentine Pavilion unveiled its much-anticipated 15th annual commission, this time appointed to young Spanish architects José Selgas...

Where my Heart Used to Beat by Sebastian Faulks

In Where My Heart Used to Beat, we witness the transformation of protagonist Robert Hendricks’s ideas on memory and its place within the present. This journey takes us through the twentieth century, memories of which still haunt many of our generation; a century of death, genocides, pogroms, purges, slaughters, the holocaust – a century best forgotten. Many philosophies of memory...

Independence Day by Manash Bhattacharjee

Independence Day (15th August, 1947) The day had turned out to be A feast for vultures Every Muslim and Hindu body Was Parsi in death The gods fled the streets of bones They left Kabir’s country desolate Water partitioned blood, Blood partitioned water, Families partitioned gold, Map partitioned memory, No one sang anthems for the dead No one raised the flag of skeletons No one remembered the forgotten Pigeons flown from the ramparts Dispersed serenity under...

Poetry Competition 2015 Winners

We are delighted to announce that the winners of TLM's 2015 Poetry Competition are as follows: 1st place: Isabel Gallymore - 'Difficult Cup' 2nd place: Wes Lee - 'Lifesaving' 3rd place: Theophilus Kwek - 'What Follows' The winning poem will be printed in the October/November issue of the magazine, and all three poems will appear on the website around the same time. Thank you to all...

‘I the sculptor am the landscape’ – Barbara Hepworth’s Roots of Stone

This year London houses a major retrospective of the work of Barbara Hepworth alongside her friend and contemporary Henry Moore at Tate Britain. The exhibition, entitled Barbara Hepworth: Sculpture for a Modern World promises to emphasise Hepworth’s status as a leading figure in the art world of the 1930s 40s and 50s and readdress the manner in which her...

Replete by Maggie Butt

Replete by Maggie Butt
Replete Enough of beauty - I have devoured small boats curtseying at anchor, green palace-dotted hills swarming the spice-scented shore of Asia Minor. I couldn’t chew another mouthful of waves, scything and winnowing light with the wash of every passing craft, and each heave of the ocean’s breath. Well, maybe just one last taste, seasoned with a pinch of myrrh: the taxi driver says, ‘Today hot but slow, slow, winter comes…”         Degrees...

O Brittania Where Art Thou? An interview with Mohammad Zahoor

by Steven O’Brien This interview originally appeared on The Huffington Post. Mohammad Zahoor is a Ukraine-based British businessman and publisher of the Kyiv post. He is dedicated to preserving the newspaper’s independence and has been keen to champion non-partisan investigative journalism in Ukraine throughout the current crisis. Mr Zahoor’s views on the conflict have been covered by the Financial Times. He is also...

Degrees of Twilight by Maggie Butt

The London Magazine Editions is delighted to present the fifth collection from critically acclaimed poet Maggie Butt, Degrees of Twilight. The passage of time is tangible in Maggie Butt’s fifth collection. These poems use history, memory, work and travel as lenses to examine the inevitable pains and sharp pleasures at the heart of our transient lives. Maggie Butt is a poet who...

The Children Act by Ian McEwan

It is not practiced perfection that hits the right note in Ian McEwan’s most recent novel but the gloriously amateur, both in the life of his protagonist and the flow of McEwan’s prose. The novel hinges on the way in which the family court deals with the most painful and intimate things in life, centring on disputes over religion and...

The First Bad Man by Miranda July

Cheryl Glickman — isolated, alone and with no true friends to speak of — is an acute example of the lonesome modern narrator. Miranda July’s first fully-fledged non-screen female protagonist has a life organized so rigidly in The First Bad Man that it has ‘no edges anywhere’. Everything in Cheryl’s life is clean, every detail ordered with obsessive compulsion to...

One Thousand Things Worth Knowing by Paul Muldoon and Sentenced to Life by Clive James

These are two very contrastive books both making a clear announcement through their titles. The first is brash, claiming something unbelievable, just as the German author Karl May, author of Winnetou, claimed to speak more than 1000 languages. Perhaps something about Paul Muldoon’s meeting with America has also made him feel entitled to be just as bold and brash as...

At the Nursing Home by Leland James

—inside an old man vacant by the window Hold me occasionally for the light is fading and I can no longer see the hills that once rose there, brown hills, sand, sand  I see the color, like the brown shoulders of a girl I knew by the lake, outside the window. Did I marry her? Were there children? Is that snow? Is it winter already again? I...

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