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Aeneid Book VI by Seamus Heaney

Faber’s publication of Heaney’s translation of Book VI of the Aeneid pays testament to the enduring poetic prowess of its translator. His posthumous connection with Virgil seems particularly apt for a writer whose poetry has been defined by tradition, mythology and politics. One of the most far-reaching and influential poets of the 20th Century, Heaney’s work is popular amongst...

Coming Thunder by James McAskill

When we stole the eggs from the barn that June  you said we held life in our hands.  Untrue I said as I carried a near score  in my upturned t-shirt.  And even if I could hold one  it would never get born  not in those hands that you let  be put on you  or in the grass nest we made  smelling of piss-yellow sunshine  or by us two,...

Three Poems by Janet Sutherland

Chalk Paths At that exact spot there was a beautiful stillness; we were poised to begin our course along the shoulder and two white lines, always at the proper angle, ran like the heavier veins of a bright mineral up to the surface—quartering, as it seemed, the land. It was as if there had been a flood, the paths dipping and rising to a pale grey...

Aeneid Book VI by Seamus Heaney

Faber’s publication of Heaney’s translation of Book VI of the Aeneid pays testament to the enduring poetic prowess of its translator. His posthumous connection with Virgil seems particularly apt for a writer whose poetry has been defined by tradition, mythology and politics. One of the most far-reaching and influential poets of the 20th Century, Heaney’s work is popular amongst...

Eros and Asbo by Miles Burrows

As a man under a restraining order Still follows his ex about from day to day I stalk your shadow as if you could show up In two places at once like St Francis of Assisi In the Aldi carpark, or the filling station. Yet when after  years of vacuous fantasy  Like an unending run of Blithe Spirit You cycle towards me smiling in the park I march...

The Easter Rising by Frank Armstrong

The one hundredth anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising will hardly register in most London Magazine readers’ minds, but for Irish people the anniversary prompts reflection on who we are. It occurred in the context of World War I where esprit de corp was merging the Irish experience with that of other ‘imagined communities’ in the British Isles, a...

Till September Petronella by Jean Rhys

From The London Magazine January 1960 There was a barrel organ playing at the corner of Torrington Square. It played 'Destiny' and ‘La Paloma’ and ‘Le Rêve Passe', all tunes I liked, and the wind was warm and kind not spiteful, which doesn't often happen in London. I packed the striped dress that Estelle had helped me to choose, and...

Onion Music by Mark Fiddes

I grow lighter for you with each striptease from skin to skin leaving a glimmering bulb a milk light by your bed for you to undress by or find your way to the loo. I remind you of your births with this universal belly its faint meridians stretched drum tight and kicking without howls or rips offering only the stillness learned from warm earth. Put me on your dresser I will be your hope...

Mothering Sunday By Graham Swift

… And could she disentangle it, the stuff she’d seen in her mind’s eye, from the actual stuff of her own life? In 1935, fleeing wartime persecution, the great philologist Erich Auerbach set up shop in Istanbul and began to assemble his iconic study of the representation of reality in Western culture, ‘Mimesis’. With only the ‘insufficient’ resources of the...

Mothering Sunday by Graham Swift

… And could she disentangle it, the stuff she’d seen in her mind’s eye, from the actual stuff of her own life? In 1935, fleeing wartime persecution, the great philologist Erich Auerbach set up shop in Istanbul and began to assemble his iconic study of the representation of reality in Western culture, ‘Mimesis’. With only the ‘insufficient’ resources of the...

What is Not Yours is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi

In a museful snippet-cum-travelogue published by Lenny Letter earlier this month, Helen Oyeyemi detailed the auto-didacticism that characterized her first visit to Prague, where she now lives on a permanent basis. She spent that winter submerged in a cavernous bathtub, checking off her reading agenda (short story collections) with cups of tea always close at hand. She learned to...

What is Not Yours is Not Yours by Helen Oyeyemi

In a museful snippet-cum-travelogue published by Lenny Letter earlier this month, Helen Oyeyemi detailed the auto-didacticism that characterized her first visit to Prague, where she now lives on a permanent basis. She spent that winter submerged in a cavernous bathtub, checking off her reading agenda (short story collections) with cups of tea always close at hand. She learned to...

Dog Run Moon by Callan Wink

Callan Wink’s debut collection of stories stands as a promising start to a fine literary career. Some of the stories included here have deservedly appeared in such prestigious magazines as Granta and The New Yorker. The opening story, the eponymous ‘Dog Run Moon’ is one of the strongest, displaying Wink’s talent for finely-managed suspense laced with powerfully evocative language....

Dog Run Moon by Callan Wink

Callan Wink’s debut collection of stories stands as a promising start to a fine literary career. Some of the stories included here have deservedly appeared in such prestigious magazines as Granta and The New Yorker. The opening story, the eponymous ‘Dog Run Moon’ is one of the strongest, displaying Wink’s talent for finely-managed suspense laced with powerfully evocative language....

The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel

The High Mountains of Portugal is not a traditional novel but instead a set of three interconnected tales that take place over the course of a century. Echoing elements from one other, the stories explore the spectrum of death and grief. They also contain Martel’s hallmark contemplations around storytelling and faith, which we know so well from his Booker...

The Mother of the Child in Question by Doris Lessing

When Doris Lessing was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 2007 she was the eleventh woman and the oldest person to ever receive the award. The judges marked her out as ‘that epicist of the female experience, who with scepticism, fire and visionary power has subjected a divided civilisation to scrutiny’. A prelude to these qualities could well...

Three Poems by Selima Hill

First published in The London Magazine, October/November 1989 Deep in the Scented House Deep in the scented house, a herring merchant is parting his wife's buttocks with cold hands; while she has buried her face into the pillows to watch the zebras passing gently by: they seem to float like swollen butterflies, their rhythmically-cantering bodies striped and hot. These are the things one hides, thinks Feiga-Ita, calmly and quietly trying to go to sleep.   Basil A high-pitched...

2016 by James Stradner

The clouds have swum down from the sky and rolled onto their backs in the streets, begging for someone to rub their fluffy bellies A day is as deep as a person and I fit perfectly I wander in My eyes flutter about drinking from fountains, puddles and gutters I stare perfectly round boreholes into the surfaces of hours Now I'm not there, I've just...

Social Contract by Rachel Willems

The politeness, not leaving any butter in the jam, or jam in the butter, or shoes in the hall. Not leaving any residue of who did what. Not leaving, for that matter. One glass of wine while I make dinner, while I rub our cut of salmon with honey and salt, you read me the news—our division of labor. In the tundra, in the burrow...

The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel

The High Mountains of Portugal is not a traditional novel but instead a set of three interconnected tales that take place over the course of a century. Echoing elements from one other, the stories explore the spectrum of death and grief. They also contain Martel’s hallmark contemplations around storytelling and faith, which we know so well from his Booker...

A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing | The Young Vic

Aoife Duffin reprises her one-woman performance for the production's London début. In Annie Ryan’s adaptation of Eimear McBride’s 2013 novel, A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing, all bets are off. The play is a deep-dive into the muck of a fated girl’s life, in which Aoife Duffin (as the Girl) occupies the entire narrative space—though her movement is minimal, and...

The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2016 | Judges

The London Magazine's annual Poetry Prize seeks out new writers whose work is adventurous, innovative and surprising in both form and content. We are very excited to confirm the judges for our 2016 Poetry Prize will be: Andrew McMillan | Rebecca Perry The competition will be opening for entries in May. More information on prizes and how to enter will be available online...

The Catch by Fiona Sampson

The cover image of Fiona Sampson’s seventh collection is bright and strange. Taken from photographer Charles Frèger’s Wilder Mann series (2010-11), it depicts a figure draped in a digitally-printed flowered cloth, holding a hobby-horse model of a reindeer head in a flat field of new-cut grass patched with melting snow.  A variety of questions are raised by this surreal...

The Catch by Fiona Sampson

The cover image of Fiona Sampson’s seventh collection is bright and strange. Taken from photographer Charles Frèger’s Wilder Mann series (2010-11), it depicts a figure draped in a digitally-printed flowered cloth, holding a hobby-horse model of a reindeer head in a flat field of new-cut grass patched with melting snow.  A variety of questions are raised by this surreal...

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