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The London Magazine Poetry Prize 2016 | Winners

Thank you so much to everyone who entered The London Magazine's Poetry Prize 2016. The standard of entries was extremely high but our judges, Rebecca Perry and Andrew McMillan, have made their choices and we are delighted to announce the winners: First place: ‘They Don't Make Gods for Non-Believers’ by Patrick Errington Second place: ‘Kira’ by Aaron Fagan Third place: ‘The Truth...

I Don’t Live in a Mountainous Country by Talin Tahajian

We look up, & beyond the maple trees & the brick steeples with weathervane roosters, clouds billow as sleeping monsters. Not the sort of billowing that clouds are usually known to do, but the steep sort, ridges as bright white cliffs. In sunlight, they pile toward the soft summer moon, alive during the day. I don’t live in a mountainous country, but we look toward the...

The Blind Roadmaker by Ian Duhig

In his latest eclectic collection of poems, Ian Duhig sings (and dances) for those marginalised in poetry and forgotten by history. The Blind Roadmaker takes its life-spirit from Jack Metcalf, a little known eighteenth-century road builder from Leeds — the source for the collection’s interest in making one’s way, through life and literature, in the dark. Metcalf is one...

Two Collections from Copper Canyon Press

When Richard Siken's first collection, Crush, was awarded the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize in 2004, it won Louise Glück's praise for its 'cumulative, driving, apocalyptic power' and was quickly shortlisted for a series of prizes, winning the Thom Gunn Award in 2006. In the intervening decade, few American poets came close to an equally well-received debut –...

New Voices from the Tower Hamlets Schools

SLAMbassadors Showcase, 14th July 2016 Close your eyes, and try to remember the last time a thirteen-year-old implored you to 'rise up and change the twisted reality this world has made', in those words. Drawing a blank? Now try and picture this: a darkened theatre in the heart of the West End, a wildly applauding audience of teachers, librarians, school...

An interview with Bernard O’Donoghue

Bernard O’Donoghue was born in 1945 in Cullen, Co Cork. His latest collection, The Seasons of Cullen Church, returns with a compelling and simple diction to that place and time. He has published six collections of poetry, including Gunpowder, which won the 1995 Whitbread Prize for Poetry, and Farmers Cross (2011). He lives in Oxford, where he is an...

The Year of the Pin-Up Calendar by Imogen Cassels

Excerpts from a previously unpublished sequence of poems named The Year of the Pin-Up Calendar. February there is a white pigeon opened like a book on the kerb     poor it could not imagine the unexpected glamour of being a pin-up – process of     violence. carcass like fleecelined glove turned insideout     like redweed in sea foam     it is the second dead animal in a week, before it was    ...

Falling Awake by Alice Oswald

'The whole challenge of poetry', Alice Oswald once wrote, 'is to keep language open, so that what we don't yet know can pass through it'. Her new collection, Falling Awake, is proof of this: full of poems that are somehow both spare and spacious, it is held together by her vision that language ought to be continuously re-made –...

Falling Awake by Alice Oswald

'The whole challenge of poetry', Alice Oswald once wrote, 'is to keep language open, so that what we don't yet know can pass through it'. Her new collection, Falling Awake, is proof of this: full of poems that are somehow both spare and spacious, it is held together by her vision that language ought to be continuously re-made –...

Catalogue of Minor Extinctions by Tyler Raso

i. labrador duck  Sitting at a disrespectful distance— ---------back where they came from—gets defensive when blinking (like only ---------shepherds have a right to). welcoming wreckage to its homeland by ---------sailboat the size of a catfish—this big, tail and lip to arm. ---------to arms. ii. upland moa Ribbed, lacking lattice, framed naked. ---------like color, she really just likes to play— private arguments in public space, like ---------they own the place. endstopped in bible verse...

Faith Healer at Donmar Warehouse

Lyndsey Turner’s revival of Brian Friel’s 1979 play uses the wisdom of age to give this oft dubbed “modern masterpiece” a dark depth, comedy, and truth in flux. Es Devlin’s stage design for Faith Healer is one of the most thrilling focal points in London theatre so far this year. It is, essentially, a water feature. Framing the stage with...

Hockney in L.A. by Robert Wennersten

To celebrate the opening of David Hockney's exhibition 82 Portraits and 1 Still-life at the Royal Academy, we've republished an interview with Hockney, which originally appeared in The London Magazine's August/September Issue, Vol. 13 No. 3, in 1973. Within this lengthy interview, Robert Wennersten talks to Hockney about success, teaching in his early career, and the artwork that hung on his walls...

Through by David Herd

David Herd begins his new collection Through with the line: ------It is possible to be precise. The wording-- “it is possible”-- is telling. Not promised, not achieved, not even desirable: possible. A Professor of Modern Literature at the University of Kent, Herd published All Just and Outwith in 2012. Here, in his third collection, Herd turns his attention to the language...

Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler

The latest novelistic offering in Hogarth Shakespeare’s project to refashion the bard’s tales into contemporary retellings, Vinegar Girl compellingly revitalises one of Shakespeare’s most controversial plays, The Taming of the Shrew. The challenge of remaining faithful to a play that has generally been interpreted as a sexist endorsement of patriarchal hegemony seems daunting, but Tyler pulls off the feat of...

An interview with Ian McMillian

In this interview with Ian McMillan, The London Magazine’s Editor, Steven O’Brien, and Production Manager, Rachel Chanter, discuss Ian McMillan’s most recent collection of selected poems, To Fold the Evening Star. SO’B: I was just reading an old, friendly poem in To Fold the Evening Star, one I haven’t read for ages – ‘It’s Only a Novelty Coronation Street Alarm...

Through by David Herd

David Herd begins his new collection Through with the line: ------It is possible to be precise. The wording-- “it is possible”-- is telling. Not promised, not achieved, not even desirable: possible. A Professor of Modern Literature at the University of Kent, Herd published All Just and Outwith in 2012. Here, in his third collection, Herd turns his attention to the language...

Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler

The latest novelistic offering in Hogarth Shakespeare’s project to refashion the bard’s tales into contemporary retellings, Vinegar Girl compellingly revitalises one of Shakespeare’s most controversial plays, The Taming of the Shrew. The challenge of remaining faithful to a play that has generally been interpreted as a sexist endorsement of patriarchal hegemony seems daunting, but Tyler pulls off the feat of...

The Spoils at Trafalgar Studios

Alongside a fruitful film career, it may come as a surprise that Jesse Eisenberg has time to publish a book of short stories, contribute regularly to The New Yorker, and bring his third and latest stage offering to London's West End. But the result is a perfectly controlled, dysfunctional buddy comedy, where the ghosts of one young man's childhood...

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