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An Interview with Saul David

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The fantastic historian and novelist Saul David popped by our offices to chat about his new book, Jack the Ripper, naughty royals and crime writing! His new novel The Prince and the Whitechapel Murders is available now.  Interview by Emma Quick and Lucy Binnersley.

Novel Writing Competition 2018

The London Magazine are proud to announce our inaugural Novel Writing Competition, in collaboration with Author Enterprises. As the oldest literary magazine in the UK, The London Magazine has been home to some of the most celebrated novelists in history - Evelyn Waugh, William Boyd, H.G. Wells, Joseph Conrad and Thomas Hardy. Author Enterprises is a company which helps authors to...

Review | The Only Story by Julian Barnes

The Only Story by Julian Barnes Readers who were a little disappointed by Barnes’s last political fiction The Noise of Time will be glad to know that he is back in top form with The Only Story, a novel that has all the zesty elegance of great vintage Barnes. The plot is minimal this time: nineteen-year-old Paul falls in love...

Editor Steven O’Brien to judge national competition, “A Poem to Remember”, for DNRC

The Defence and National Rehabilitation Centre (DNRC) today launched an exciting new national poetry competition to mark the 100th anniversary of the end of the First World War and celebrate the creation of a world leading clinical rehabilitation facility for the Armed Forces. Called ‘A Poem to Remember’ and inspired by the Great War Poets of the First World War,...

The Line | Fiona Sampson

White trunks divide the dark beside the line and in the dusk trees pause since if they do not move they cannot see themselves or know this moment has to end that stretches out beside the line as held breath prolongs itself by holding still because we do not want the day to end because to stay like this brings the dusk close to us as we are close touching not touching together...

The Arrangement | Jennifer Johnson

There’s someone in the kitchen. I hear the kettle being filled. I look at the clock, it’s not yet seven, he’s up early. He must have woken me, but I don’t mind. I like hearing someone else here, another human being. It’s bright outside, the sun’s up; too bright, makes me think of ‘sun before seven, rain before eleven’....

On Writing Ethnic Stories | Haleh Agar

I was told to use my maiden name – Hassan-Yari, a name that usually meant extra questions at the customs queue but now would mean a fast-pass to the front of the line in the world of publishing. The middle-aged heterosexual white man’s hold on contemporary literature had loosened. Apparently. They wanted my stories. All I had to do...

Short Story Competition 2017 | Winners

The London Magazine are pleased to announce the winners of our 2017 Short Story Competition. 1st Place - Solitaire by Theo Greenblatt 2nd Place - Asma by Dur e Aziz Amna 3rd Place - Sylvia Plath watches us sleep, but we don’t mind by Victoria Richards   Shortlist Joseph K was not on Facebook by Rhys Timson Queen Victoria by Campaspe Lloyd-Jacob A Place of Grace by Frank Dullaghan Sweet...

Review | Guglielmo Alfarone at Ping-Pong Covent Garden

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Guglielmo Alfarone for "Art Comes Alive at Ping-Pong Dim Sum" “What happens tonight is a surprise for me as much as it is you… I don’t really know what is going to happen.” On the basement floor of Ping-Pong Dim Sum restaurant in Covent Garden, a smiling but nervous young Italian man stands in front of a floor-to-ceiling white sheet. His...

Review | Steak at The Worlds End Market

  My fellow explorer Toby and I went searching for the best steak ever. We dared the seething rapids of the escalators on the Victoria Line. We were stifled in the log-jams around the fabled Sloane Square. Everywhere we seemed to be turned back. The distances too great. The direction unsure.  At last a dragoman in a London cab took...

Review | Simpson’s Tavern

‘Do you want a sausage with that?’ So chipped the waiter. He was splay–bearded, like a sergeant major in the Pioneer Corps. His apron was like a bed sheet. The question of the optional sausage is the clarion cry at Simpsons Tavern, Cornhill. Everyone is offered one; no matter what they order. This venerable old City institution first opened in...

Review | Sons and Lovers: The Biography of a Novel by Neil Roberts

Sons and Lovers: The Biography of a Novel Neil Roberts, Clemson University Press   As the subtitle to this literary study indicates, Neil Roberts offers a biographical and genetic reading of the emergence of one of the most salient novels in the English language. Roberts’s fine-tuned critical savvy will delight both the lay reader and the D.H. Lawrence specialist as it...

Review | Richard III: Brother, Protector, King by Chris Skidmore

DICK THE BAD: HISTORY’S MOST FAMOUS MURDER SUSPECT Richard III: Brother, Protector, King - by Chris Skidmore Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20 ‘Edwards Four, Five, Dick the Bad/ Harrys Twain and Ned the Lad’. So runs part of the well-known rhyme through which the kings and queens of England are widely remembered. The lines cover the last medieval kings belonging to the House...

Review | Rainsongs, by Sue Hubbard

Sue Hubbard’s Rainsongs has a unique and beautiful emotive quality that shines through its delicately constructed prose in a love-letter to Ireland, memory and parenthood, taking advantage of its mature narrator to speak with resonance and depth. In a contemporary world of instant connections, Rainsongs returns to an age just prior to the boom of social media – 2007 –...

Interview | Stephen Fry

Stephen Fry is a broadcaster, actor and writer who has just written Mythos, an elegant and entertaining retelling of the myths of Ancient Greece. Watch our full interview here. How would you describe yourself to our readers? I'm a whole parcel of different things, I never quite know what to say when people ask me what I do. I spend more hours...

Friends of TLM | An Interview with Rachel Hurd-Wood

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The first in our new interview series - Friends of The London Magazine Rachel Hurd-Wood is an actress and writer who has been published in The London Magazine with both poetry and an essay. We stopped by for a festive chat about writing, London and Destiny's Child! How would you describe yourself to our readers? I am a 27 year old...

The London Magazine Essay Competition 2017 | Winners

We are very pleased to announce the winners of our inaugural essay competition: First Place: "On Writing Ethnic Stories" by Haleh Agar Second Place: "The Fire This Time" by Max Dunbar Third Place: "The School of IKEA" by Peter Slater Our judges, Nikita Lalwani and Laurel Forster, were struck by the breadth of subjects tackled in these essays, some based in cultural or social issues, and others discussing readers...

Charles Dibdin – Christmas Gambols

Charles Dibdin (1745-1814) has a strong claim to be Britain’s first pop star. He became famous as a performer in the 1760s, then went on to both write and compose the two most enduringly successful English operas of the 1770s, The Waterman (1774) and The Quaker (1775), both still being revived a century later. These works reveal his extraordinary...

Interview | Bruce McLean

Bruce McLean is a Scottish performance sculptor who has just written A Lawnmower in the Loft - an amusing and light-hearted collection of snapshot anecdotes from over the years. We stopped by his studio for a chat.       Could you tell our readers a bit about yourself and your work? That could take a long time. I’m a...

Poetry Prize 2017 Ceremony

On November 2nd 2017 The London Magazine celebrated the winners of the Poetry Prize 2017 with a drinks reception held at Collyer Bristow Gallery. The prizes were presented by Grey Gowrie (Special Editorial Advisor for the London Magazine) and Steven O’Brien (Editor of The London Magazine). Champagne flowed as Steven O’Brien gave a speech praising the winners, quoting E.E. Cummings:...

An Interview with Frieda Hughes

We caught up with Frieda Hughes, one of this year's Poetry Prize 2017 judges. Although this prize has now closed, Frieda will begin reading your entries in the coming weeks. In this interview, she gives poets advice on how to make  tells us why she loves judging poetry competitions You’ve got an exhibition in Chichester Cathedral this summer, along with...

Poetry London Summer Readings: Rachael Allen, Andrew McMillan, Vahni Capildeo and Emily Berry

Poetry London’s summer launch opened with an impassioned speech by the poet Karen McCarthy Wood, who is a trustee on the magazine’s board. The magazine is known for its support for ‘new and emerging poets’, Karen says, noting that one third of each issue is devoted to poets who have yet to publish a first collection. New names are...

Joel Shapiro at Pace London

Walking into the Joel Shapiro exhibition at the Pace gallery is like entering a painting, as a friend of mine said when she first saw the exhibition. Seven of Shapiro’s sculptures are positioned in the white gallery space, filling it with blots of vibrant colour. Several of these volumetric shapes are suspended from the ceiling on thin cords; others...

An interview with Patricia McCarthy

We spoke to Patricia McCarthy, one of the judges for our Poetry Prize 2017, who gave a bit of advice on entering this year's competition. As well as editing the poetry journal Agenda, you’ve also had many of your own collections published, including two titles due to be released this year alone (Rockabye from Worple Press and Shot Silks from Waterloo...

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