Review | Mothlight by Adam Scovell

Adam Scovell’s debut novel is narrated by Thomas, a young man who hallucinates the memories of his deceased mentor, Phyllis Ewans. Phyllis is a lepidopterist who lived in Thomas’s town in Cheshire when he was a child, and they reconnect in London after Thomas has also become an academic who studies moths. He travels and […]

Review | Nocilla Lab | Agustín Fernández Mallo

Nocilla Lab, Agustín Fernández Mallo (Translated by Thomas Bunstead), Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2019, pp. 192, £12.99 “The fascination of humankind with beaches goes to the heart of a time that has the form of a Rubik’s cube.” It is difficult to summarize Agustín Fernández Mallo’s Nocilla Lab, or even to put together one’s thoughts about it. […]

Dido and Aeneas by Jeffrey Meyers

Autumn in Venice: Ernest Hemingway and His Last Muse, Andrea di Robilant, Atlantic Books, 348 pp. £17.99 (hardback). Andrea di Robilant has done extensive research, but has not found significant new material about Hemingway and his love and inspiration Adriana Ivancich.  He is good, however, on the rivalry of the Italian publishers Mondadori and Einaudi.  […]

Interview | Andrew Kötting at St Leonards International Film Festival

St Leonard’s International Film Festival Blackmarket VIP, George St, Hastings 19-21th January HUBUBINTHEBAOBABS – 1987 33 minutes HOI POLLOI 1990 – 10 minutes SMART ALEK 1993 – 18 minutes JAUNT 1995 – 5 minutes DONKEYHEAD 1998 – 4minutes KINGDOMPROTISTA 2000 – 6 minutes ME 1999 – 5minutes In the seaside town of Hastings, in an old, old street in the old town, I climb up the stairs on a cold Sunday […]

Review | Tracey Emin: A Fortnight of Tears at White Cube

A Fortnight of Tears is a major new exhibition of works by acclaimed British artist Tracey Emin. The show features features a large selection of pieces, across a wide variety of media. Upon entering into the stark space of the White Cube, one is immediately confronted by fifty self portraits of Emin. The photographs, taken […]

Essay | The Warlock of Love: Revisiting Marc Bolan’s Forgotten Poetry Book Fifty Years On by Joobin Bekhrad

Fifty years ago in March 1969, a rather odd book of verse hit Britain’s bookshelves. Its jacket contained no description of what lay inside — only the image, on both its front and back, of an ashen-faced man, sceptre in hand and visage obscured by corkscrew curls, sitting proudly beneath an egg-like orb. Its title, […]

Archive | Breakfast with Borges by Andrew Graham-Yooll

First published in The London Magazine March 1983, Vol.22, No.12 Jorge Luis Borges entered the Pedmonte Restaurant on Avenida de Mayo with the stiff steps of the unseeing; his face jutting forward to sense what the eyes could not see. It was August 23. Borges was eating out to mark his eighty-third birthday. The eating-house, traditional to […]

Review | Among The Lost by Emiliano Monge

In the desolate wastelands between the sierra and the jungle, under an all-seeing, unforgiving sun, a single day unfolds as relentlessly as those that have gone before. People are trafficked and brutalised, illegal migrants are cheated of their money, their dreams, their very names even as countless others scrabble to cross the border, trying to […]

Review | Ghislaine Leung at the Chisenhale Gallery

Ghislaine Leung’s Constitution opened at the Chisenhale Gallery on the 25th January 2019. The work explores the notion of withdrawal and dependency, utilising noise-cancelling technology to define a sonic space. The work is manifest when a series of guidelines are followed, the size of the door, the internal space. In this way, the piece controls […]

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