TLM News

Thank you so much to everyone who entered The London Magazine‘s Short Story Competition 2016. We were delighted to see such a large volume and high standard of entries. Judges Max Porter, Erica Wagner and Angus Cargill have made their decision, and we are very pleased to announce the winners: First place: The Match Factory by Emma Hughes Second place: I Have Called You By Your Name by Anne O'Brien Third place: The Ideal Husband Exhibition by Dan Powell Each of these short stories will be published in upcoming issues of The London Magazine as well as online. The winners will be awarded their prizes at a ceremony held at the House of...

We were delighted to host a lunch on Monday 12th December in The D'Oyly Carte Room, welcoming Anthony Horowitz, Frieda Hughes, Damon Hill, Robert McCrum, Hugo Williams, Daisy Dunn. Thank you to everyone who attended and helped us round off a great year for The London Magazine.

On Tuesday 13th December, The London Magazine sponsored the reception of the 1922 Committee at the House of Commons terrace. We were honoured to present the Prime Minister, Theresa May, with a copy of our latest issue.  

Attention all entrants! With only a month until our Short Story Competition 2016 closes, we spoke to our editor, Steven O'Brien, for some tips on how to write a good short story and advice on how to make your entries stand out! What are you currently reading? The Old Ways by Robert MacFarlane and The Beast by Paul Kingsnorth. Both deeply English narratives. What is your favourite short story and why? The Dead by James Joyce, for its' sweep, symbolism and epiphany. Which writer's work can you always rely on to inspire your creative process? Robert Holdstock. If you were stuck on a desert island and...

With just over a month until our Short Story Competition 2016 closes, we spoke to one of the judges, Erica Wagner, and found out that Emily Dickinson inspires her creative process. She also told us what three elements she believes are key to a good short story.    What are you currently reading? If it’s not fiction, what fiction have you recently read and enjoyed? And what specifically did you like about it? I’ve just read Yaa Gyasi’s wonderful novel, Homegoing (coming in the UK from Penguin in January) and I’m trying not to get to the end of Margaret Atwood’s Hag-Seed, her take on The...

With just over a month until our Short Story Competition 2016 closes, we spoke to judge Max Porter and found out about which writer never fails to inspire him, which three books he'd take if he were stranded on a desert island, and what advice he'd give to this year's competition entrants.   What are you currently reading? If it’s not fiction, what fiction have you recently read and enjoyed? I’m reading Lian Hearn’s Japanese adventure series Shikanoko, Eileen Myles’ I Must Be Living Twice, and some Peter Stamm short stories. And what specifically did you like about it? I like the very controlled and worthwhile magic realism...

With just over a month until our Short Story Competition 2016 closes, we caught up with judge Angus Cargill and found out about his favourite short story, what he's currently reading and what he sees as they key elements of a short story (take note, competition entrants!).   What are you currently reading? And what specifically did you like about it? The three last novels I read, away from work, were My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout, Transit by Rachel Cusk and Willnot by James Sallis – three short novels that would be said to be from different genres (the first two...

If you put on a production of Romeo and Juliet in Verona, how much does anyone care that the action is ostensibly set in the streets around them? My guess is that we understand when a setting is a stand in for ‘far far away’, and are happy to displace it in our heads to another similarly foreign location for the duration of the show. This question is at the front of the mind when watching Rufus Norris’s new National Theatre production of The Threepenny Opera, Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill’s Victorian London-set fable. This is no more a...

On Thursday 25th August, The London Magazine awarded the winners of the Poetry Prize 2016 at an event held at the Collyer Bristow Gallery. The prizes were presented by poets Andrew McMillan and Rebecca Perry, who praised each poem individually and explained why they chose each as winners (these detailed explanations will be published in the October/November Issue of the magazine, along with the three prize-winning poems). The majority of the longlist, including all three winners, and many of The London Magazine's contributors were also in attendance. We would like to thank all applicants to the Poetry Prize 2016. The quality of work we...

This competition is now closed. Thanks to all who entered. The longlist, shortlist and winners will be announced over the next few months. Keep checking our ‘Competitions’ section and sign up to our newsletter for updates. Autumn is here, which means The London Magazine's Short Story Competition 2016 is upon us. The London Magazine has published short stories by some of the most well-respected literary figures over the course of long history. Our annual Short Story Competition seeks out new voices to join them. Established to encourage emerging literary talent, the award provides an opportunity for publication and recognition, as well as rewarding imagination, originality and...

Australian theatre’s “enfant terrible,” Simon Stone, rewrites and directs Lorca’s Yerma through a glass darkly. Opening night of Yerma at The Young Vic provided some of the most curious pre-show moments of the year. A luminous glass cage encloses the stage, dissecting the Main House into two sections. Once seated, for a split second, you are shocked to stare straight into the ghostly reflections of yourself and your neighbors, but no, they are actually your fellow playgoers settled directly across. Promptly at the play’s start time, Simon Stone, the redactor of this 1934 poetic tragedy by Federico García Lorca, sprung...

I am incredibly tickled to feature so prominently in Nicholas Royle’s introductory essay for Salt’s Best British Stories 2016. I have never met Nicholas, nor read his work and don’t know much about him, but his prissy comments about my role as editor of The London Magazine are a sheer delight. A public attack of such sherbet vehemence seems quaintly old fashioned. It is a lavender literary pose, redolent of the catty cliques of the 1950s. I love the way in which he sets himself up as the arbiter of cool and etiquette. He is certainly big with himself,...

Thank you so much to everyone who entered The London Magazine's Poetry Prize 2016. The standard of entries was extremely high but our judges, Rebecca Perry and Andrew McMillan, have made their choices and we are delighted to announce the winners: First place: ‘They Don't Make Gods for Non-Believers’ by Patrick Errington Second place: ‘Kira’ by Aaron Fagan Third place: ‘The Truth About Figs’ by Angela Carr Each of these poems will be published in the October/November Issue of The London Magazine as well as online. The winners will be awarded their prizes at a ceremony held at the Collyer Bristow gallery in London later this month. We...

We look up, & beyond the maple trees & the brick steeples with weathervane roosters, clouds billow as sleeping monsters. Not the sort of billowing that clouds are usually known to do, but the steep sort, ridges as bright white cliffs. In sunlight, they pile toward the soft summer moon, alive during the day. I don’t live in a mountainous country, but we look toward the horizon & pretend. August hurricanes & we sip our tea & pretend there is no rain. We rip off our clothes & wade into the rushing grey Atlantic. What is left to say about the color of the sea? At night we sleep alone....

In his latest eclectic collection of poems, Ian Duhig sings (and dances) for those marginalised in poetry and forgotten by history. The Blind Roadmaker takes its life-spirit from Jack Metcalf, a little known eighteenth-century road builder from Leeds — the source for the collection’s interest in making one’s way, through life and literature, in the dark. Metcalf is one anchoring presence for a collection that revels in its own inability to stay on track. Unapologetically digressive and formidably allusive at most times, Duhig leaves his reader little time for respite or reflection in a relentless journey that, Shandy-like, improvises...

When Richard Siken's first collection, Crush, was awarded the Yale Series of Younger Poets Prize in 2004, it won Louise Glück's praise for its 'cumulative, driving, apocalyptic power' and was quickly shortlisted for a series of prizes, winning the Thom Gunn Award in 2006. In the intervening decade, few American poets came close to an equally well-received debut – until Ocean Vuong's Night Sky with Exit Wounds sold out within a week of its release this April by Copper Canyon Press, which also brought out Siken's second volume War of the Foxes. Published less than a year apart, the...

SLAMbassadors Showcase, 14th July 2016 Close your eyes, and try to remember the last time a thirteen-year-old implored you to 'rise up and change the twisted reality this world has made', in those words. Drawing a blank? Now try and picture this: a darkened theatre in the heart of the West End, a wildly applauding audience of teachers, librarians, school mums and friends, and more than a dozen brave, articulate teenagers taking the stage with most spot-on, heart-thumping verses about the world and their place in it. The showcase marked the end of another SLAMbassadors season for four Tower Hamlets schools...

Bernard O’Donoghue was born in 1945 in Cullen, Co Cork. His latest collection, The Seasons of Cullen Church, returns with a compelling and simple diction to that place and time. He has published six collections of poetry, including Gunpowder, which won the 1995 Whitbread Prize for Poetry, and Farmers Cross (2011). He lives in Oxford, where he is an Emeritus Fellow of Wadham College, and is currently translating Piers Plowman for Faber. AT-D: I was struck by a line in the collection’s opening poem, describing the difficulty of recollection: ‘like a green caravan in a field-corner’. Was that an impetus...

Excerpts from a previously unpublished sequence of poems named The Year of the Pin-Up Calendar. February there is a white pigeon opened like a book on the kerb     poor it could not imagine the unexpected glamour of being a pin-up – process of     violence. carcass like fleecelined glove turned insideout     like redweed in sea foam     it is the second dead animal in a week, before it was     ladybird the colour of tired blood (dark especially orange) against classic carpet in noncommittal blue     and spotting another one crawling on the sill I realised it a room infested with bloodspots going about their daily selves as if there     were nothing more natural or better to...

It was three weeks into Kurt’s big adventure that his digital self was stolen. Before that, everything had been going to plan. He’d been live-streaming the sights via a head-mounted HD camera and vlogging on Youtube at the end of each day. Though physically alone, his internet presence made him feel as if his friends and family were always with him. And he’d been keen to show his followers exactly how much fun he was having. He’d taken a Eurostar to France and a train to Monaco before cycling across the Spanish border, heading to Barcelona. From there, he’d boarded...

'The whole challenge of poetry', Alice Oswald once wrote, 'is to keep language open, so that what we don't yet know can pass through it'. Her new collection, Falling Awake, is proof of this: full of poems that are somehow both spare and spacious, it is held together by her vision that language ought to be continuously re-made – and always revelatory. The most striking poems in this volume are brief and tightly-formed, resembling woodcuts in their ability to record strokes of light and shade. Rarely longer than a page, they employ quick, untrammelled lines to sketch the contours of...

i. labrador duck  Sitting at a disrespectful distance— ---------back where they came from—gets defensive when blinking (like only ---------shepherds have a right to). welcoming wreckage to its homeland by ---------sailboat the size of a catfish—this big, tail and lip to arm. ---------to arms. ii. upland moa Ribbed, lacking lattice, framed naked. ---------like color, she really just likes to play— private arguments in public space, like ---------they own the place. endstopped in bible verse is the ---------cross-hatch as old as weather—Noah’s speciation, no longer room to complain— ---------Mayflower honeymoon. legs like gossip. iii. pile-builder megapode She hoards all the beautiful lines. So we’ll say nothing more about her. iv. white-winged sandpiper Miss Adventure: Great Auntie ---------Matilda who is only famous for catching on fire....

Simon Armitage’s new translation of the fourteenth-century poem Pearl follows his energetic 2008 translation of the same anonymous poet’s Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, which enjoyed great popularity and critical acclaim. Those hoping to find in Pearl a sequel to Gawain’s rollicking quest will search in vain, for the colloquialisms that tickled the ear in the Gawain translation (‘bogeyman’, ‘flummoxed’, ‘bamboozled’) are largely missing from the more melancholic Pearl. Here, the narrator mourns the death of his infant daughter, his Pearl. Entering a dream landscape he finds her again: their dialogue, across time and death and space, forms...

This year's contenders for the Felix Dennis Prize represent an exciting new generation of poets emerging beyond the bounds of well-trodden publication routes like Faber's New Poets scheme. From Tiphanie Yanique, an award-winning American fiction writer and poet, to Harry Giles, a familiar name on the Scottish spoken word circuit, and Ron Carey, a former engineer and recent graduate of the University of South Wales' MPhil in Writing, the prestigious shortlist (rightly) recognizes growing contributions from outside a traditionally London-centred 'new writing' scene. Harry Giles' Tonguit (Freight Poetry, 2015) is almost certainly the most formally and linguistically inventive on the...